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  1. Crisis Management and an Ethic of Care: The Case of Northern Rock Bank. [REVIEW]Philip M. Linsley & Richard E. Slack - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):285-295.
    Different ethical frameworks have been proposed as appropriate for integrating into crisis management strategies. This study examines an ethic of care approach to crisis management analysing the case of Northern Rock bank which was at the centre of the recent financial crisis in the UK. The development and maintenance of relationships is fundamental to an ethic of care approach and the research recognises this by examining the bank–stakeholder relationship both before and after the crisis. Considerable anger was directed at the (...)
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  • Levinas, Weber, and a Hybrid Framework for Business Ethics.Payman Tajalli & Steven Segal - 2019 - Philosophy of Management 18 (1):71-88.
    In this paper we present a theoretical hybrid framework for ethical decision making, drawing upon Emmanuel Levinas’ view on ethics as “first philosophy”, as an inherent infinite responsibility for the other. The pivotal concept in this framework is an appeal to a heightened sense of personal responsibility of the moral actor to provide the ethical context within which conventional approaches to applied business ethics could be engaged. Max Weber’s method of reconciling absolutism and relativism in ethical decision making is adopted (...)
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  • Employee Reactions to Leader-Initiated Crisis Preparation: Core Dimensions.Marcus Selart, Svein Tvedt Johansen & Synnøve Nesse - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):99-106.
    Crisis prevention plans are usually evaluated based on their effects in terms of preventing or limiting organizational crisis. In this survey-based study, the focus was instead on how such plans influence employees’ reactions in terms of risk perception and well-being. Five different organizations were addressed in the study. Hypothesis 1 tested the assumption that leadership crisis preparation would lead to lower perceived risk among the employees. Hypothesis 2 tested the conjecture that it would also lead to a higher degree of (...)
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  • Surviving a Crisis: How Crisis Type and Psychological Distance Can Inform Corporate Crisis Responses.So Young Lee, Yoon Hi Sung, Dongwon Choi & Dong Hoo Kim - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    This research examines how one’s construal level of a crisis differs by crisis type, and how the interplay of crisis type and apology appeal type impacts the effectiveness of apology messages in a corporate crisis context. Findings indicate that one’s mental construal toward a crisis varies by crisis type, with a self-threatening crisis leading to a lower level of construal than a society-threatening one. Findings further suggest that in a society-threatening crisis condition, an informational apology was more effective than an (...)
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  • Evaluating Ethical Approaches to Crisis Leadership: Insights From Unintentional Harm Research. [REVIEW]David C. Bauman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (2):281 - 295.
    Leading a corporation through a crisis requires rational decision making guided by an ethical approach (Snyder et al., Journal of Business Ethics, 63, 2006, 371). Three such approaches are virtue ethics (Seeger and Ulmer, Journal of Business Ethics, 31, 2001, 369), an ethic of justice, and an ethic of care (Simóla, Journal of Business Ethics, 46, 2003, 351). In this article, I consider the effectiveness of these approaches for leading a corporation after a crisis. The standard I use is drawn (...)
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  • Individual and Organizational Antecedents of Professional Ethics of Public Relations Practitioners in Korea.Ji Yeon Han, Hyun Soon Park & Hyeonju Jeong - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):553-566.
    This study examines the effects of individual ethical values and organizational factors on the professional ethics of PR practitioners in Korea by considering a person–situation interactionist model. Individual ethical values are used as individual factors, and organizational factors consist of an organization’s reward and punishment for ethical/unethical behavior, the behavior of peers, and the ethical integrity of the chief ethics officer. The professional ethics of PR practitioners (the dependent variable) are classified into the following three dimensions: professional ethics for the (...)
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  • Congruence Effects in Post-Crisis CSR Communication: The Mediating Role of Attribution of Corporate Motives.Sojung Kim & Sejung Marina Choi - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (2):447-463.
    Corporate social responsibility has grown on the corporate agenda and is at the heart of today’s corporate culture. While much research has examined CSR strategies and effects, the effects of post-crisis CSR communication have received relatively little academic attention. Therefore, this paper uses two experimental studies to examine several key contingency factors that influence consumers’ responses to post-crisis CSR initiatives. Results suggest that consumers demonstrate more favorable responses when a company launches a CSR initiative congruent with the crisis issue, or (...)
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  • Approaches to Ethics for Corporate Crisis Management.Per Sandin - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):109-116.
    The ethics of corporate crisis management is a seriously underdeveloped field. Among recent proposals in the area, two contributions stand out: Seeger and Ulmer’s (2001) virtue ethics approach to crisis management ethics and Simola’s (2003) ethics of care. In the first part of the paper, I argue that both contributions are problematic: Seeger and Ulmer focus on top management and propose virtues that lack substance and are in need of further development. Simola’s proposal is also fraught with difficulty, since it (...)
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