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  1. Does the State Have Moral Duties? State Duty-Claims and the Possibility of Institutionally Held Moral Obligations.Christoffer Spencer Lammer-Heindel - unknown
    We commonly attribute to states and other institutional organizations moral duties and obligations. For example, it is widely held that the state has a moral duty to protect its citizens from external threats and it is claimed that it ought to positively promote the welfare of its members. When we focus on the surface grammar of such institutional duty-claims, we see that they seem to differ from individual duty-claims only with respect to the subject of the claim. Whereas an institutional (...)
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  • Rethinking Microfinance: Towards a Multi-Stakeholder Framework of Responsible Microfinance.Landolt Simone - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Zurich
    Microfinance aims to better the livelihoods of the bottom of the pyramid by providing them with financial services. However, recent studies show that microfinance can have adverse effects, leading clients into over-indebtedness. This dissertation argues that microfinance clients are by default vulnerable and offers ways to rethink microfinance as client-centered, presuming a responsibility for client protection. Part I discusses the vulnerability of clients and the centrality of their protection. Part II analyzes the causes and consequences of overindebtedness and suggests state (...)
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  • The Ethical Stance in Banking.Jesus Simeon Villa Villa - unknown
    Banks have a central role and importance in all commerce and hence in all societies. This thesis investigates the ethical basis of banking practice with the aim of developing an account of the virtues appropriate to bankers and banking. One central issue concerns a conflict between the interests of banks and their customers, and how this conflict plays out in relation to the lending policies and fee structure of banks. Such lending policies can have a significant effect on banks, their (...)
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  • ‘The Ethics of Managerial Subjectivity’.Eduardo Ibarra-Colado, Stewart R. Clegg, Carl Rhodes & Martin Kornberger - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):45-55.
    This paper examines ethics in organizations in relation to the subjectivity of managers. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault we seek to theorize ethics in terms of the meaning of being a manager who is an active ethical subject. Such a manager is so in relation to the organizational structures and norms that govern the conduct of ethics. Our approach locates ethics in the relation between individual morality and organizationally prescribed principles assumed to guide personal action. In this way (...)
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  • Corporate Legal Responsibility: A Levinasian Perspective.Conceição Soares - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):545-553.
    In this article I will look into Corporate Legal Responsibility taking into account Levinas’s notion of infinite responsibility, as well as his understanding of ethical language. My account of Levinas’s philosophy will show that it challenges – breaking down – deeply entrenched distinctions in the dominant strands of moral philosophy, within which the theory of individual responsibility is embedded, such as between:(1) duty to others on the one hand and supererogation on the other; (2) perfect duty to others on the (...)
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  • Mutually Enhancing Responsibility: A Theoretical Exploration of the Interaction Mechanisms Between Individual and Corporate Moral Responsibility.Muel Kaptein & Mihaela Constantinescu - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (2):325-339.
    Moral responsibility for outcomes in corporate settings can be ascribed either to the individual members, the corporation, or both. In the latter case, the relationship between individual and corporate responsibility has been approached as inversely proportional, such that an increase in individual responsibility leads to a corresponding decrease in corporate responsibility and vice versa. In this article, we develop a non-proportionate approach, where, under specific conditions, individual and corporate moral responsibilities interact dynamically, leading to a mutual enhancement of responsibility: the (...)
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  • The Ethics of Managerial Subjectivity.Eduardo Ibarra-Colado, Stewart R. Clegg, Carl Rhodes & Martin Kornberger - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):45 - 55.
    This paper examines ethics in organizations in relation to the subjectivity of managers. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault we seek to theorize ethics in terms of the meaning of being a manager who is an active ethical subject. Such a manager is so in relation to the organizational structures and norms that govern the conduct of ethics. Our approach locates ethics in the relation between individual morality and organizationally prescribed principles assumed to guide personal action. In this way (...)
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  • Human Rights and the New Corporate Accountability: Learning From Recent Developments in Corporate Criminal Liability. [REVIEW]Aurora Voiculescu - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (2):419 - 432.
    The 3rd Report of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General of the United Nations appears to have generated significant consensus around its approach to business and human rights. This state of harmony relies mainly upon a narrow mandate limiting the endeavour largely to a mapping exercise. It also relies upon a process of 'operationalisation' that is yet to be undertaken despite the recent release of a 4th Report. After a brief presentation of the main parameters of the framework proposed by (...)
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  • Integrating Ethics All the Way Through: The Issue of Moral Agency Reconsidered.Rogene A. Buchholz & Sandra B. Rosenthal - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2-3):233-239.
    Integrating "ethics all the way through" an organization suggests that the issue of moral agency and the corporation be reconsidered. Is the corporation a moral agent in some sense or is it no more than the people who are a part of the organization? Views which stress the role of the individual lose sight of the whole corporate entity, and views which think of the corporation as a collective lose sight of the individual. A view which rejects both these alternatives (...)
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  • For or Against Corporate Identity? Personification and the Problem of Moral Agency.Ian Ashman & Diana Winstanley - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):83-95.
    This article explores the concept of corporate identity from a moral perspective. In it we argue that the reification and personification involved in attributing an identity to an organization has moral repercussions. Through a discussion of 'intentionality' we suggest that it is philosophically problematic to treat an abstraction of the corporation as possessing identity or acting as a conscious moral agent. The article moves to consider practical and ethical issues in the areas of organizational commitment, of health and safety, and (...)
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  • Should Corporations Have the Right to Vote? A Paradox in the Theory of Corporate Moral Agency.John Hasnas - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (3):657-670.
    In his 2007 Ethics article, “Responsibility Incorporated,” Philip Pettit argued that corporations qualify as morally responsible agents because they possess autonomy, normative judgment, and the capacity for self-control. Although there is ongoing debate over whether corporations have these capacities, both proponents and opponents of corporate moral agency appear to agree that Pettit correctly identified the requirements for moral agency. In this article, I do not take issue with either the claim that autonomy, normative judgment, and self-control are the requirements for (...)
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  • Moral Agency in Charities and Business Corporations: Exploring the Constraints of Law and Regulation.Eleanor Burt & Samuel Mansell - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    For centuries in the UK and elsewhere, charities have been widely regarded as admirable and virtuous organisations. Business corporations, by contrast, have been characterised in the popular imagination as entities that lack a capacity for moral judgement. Drawing on the philosophical literature on the moral agency of organisations, we examine how the law shapes the ability of charities and business corporations headquartered in England to exercise moral agency. Paradoxically, we find that charities are legally constrained in exercising moral agency in (...)
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  • Moral Intensity as a Predictor of Social Responsibility.Eugene D. Jaffe & Hanoch Pasternak - 2006 - Business Ethics 15 (1):53–63.
  • Stakeholder Approach: What Effects Should We Take Into Account in Contemporary Societies? [REVIEW]Jose Maria Lopez-De-Pedro & Eva Rimbau-Gilabert - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):147-158.
    In recent years, the stakeholder approach has been widely applied in the debate on corporate social responsibility (CSR). Although many authors of this approach have reviewed many elements of the model, they have unconditionally accepted several criteria assumed by Freeman ( 1984 ) to identify stakeholders. In general, stakeholder authors have assumed that (a) the company establishes dyadic relationships with other agents, and (b) decisions made by a company only have foreseen and direct effects on other agents. These criteria have (...)
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  • Moral Intensity as a Predictor of Social Responsibility.Eugene D. Jaffe & Hanoch Pasternak - 2006 - Business Ethics: A European Review 15 (1):53-63.
  • Beyond the Stalemate of Economics Versus Ethics: Corporate Social Responsibility and the Discourse of the Organizational Self.Michaela Driver - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (4):337-356.
    The purpose of this paper is to advance research on CSR beyond the stalemate of economic versus ethical models by providing an alternative perspective integrating existing views and allowing for more shared dialog and research in the field. It is suggested that we move beyond making a normative case for ethical models and practices of CSR by moving beyond the question of how to manage organizational self-interest toward the question of how accurate current conceptions of the organizational self seem to (...)
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  • In Search of Individual Responsibility: The Dark Side of Organizations in the Light of Jansenist Ethics.Ghislain Deslandes - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):61-70.
    In showing how the bureaucratic space negatively influences the moral conscience of managers, Robert Jackall’s sociological writings have pointed up one of the darkest sides of organizations. In fact, in the business ethics literature there is much to support Jackall’s pessimistic contentions, suggesting that bureaucracy can rob individual managers of their sense of responsibility. How then can this space for individual freedom, so essential in re-establishing responsible management, be recreated? In order to answer this question, we propose to interpret Jackall’s (...)
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