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  1. Peisetaerus' 'Satyric' Treatment of Iris: Aristophanes "Birds" 1253-6.E. W. Scharffenberger - 1995 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 115:172-173.
  • Aristophanes, Wealth 227–9.David J. Jacobson - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (1):417-419.
    This note concerns the meaning of the phrase μελήσει ταῦτα and the anomalous use of the singular demonstrative pronoun in Aristophanes, Wealth 229. Although the manuscripts are unanimous in their readings, I argue that the paradosis should be emended to μελήσει ταῦτα.
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  • FromPonêrostoPharmakos: Theater, Social Drama, and Revolution in Athens, 428-404 BCE.David Rosenbloom - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (2):283-346.
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  • Aristophanes'Adôniazousai.L. Reitzammer - 2008 - Classical Antiquity 27 (2):282-333.
    A scholiast's note on Lysistrata mentions that there was an alternative title to the play: Adôniazousai. A close reading of the play with this title in mind reveals that Lysistrata and her allies metaphorically hold an Adonis festival atop the Acropolis. The Adonia, a festival that is typically regarded as “marginal” and “private” by modern scholars, thus becomes symbolically central and public as the sex-strike held by the women halts the Peloponnesian war. The public space of the Acropolis becomes, notionally, (...)
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