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  1. Criticizing Politicians in Ancient Comedy.María José García Soler - 2013 - Humanitas 65:55-70.
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  • Comic Satire and Freedom of Speech in Classical Athens.Stephen Halliwell - 1991 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 111:48-70.
  • The Five Talents Cleon Coughed Up.Edwin M. Carawan - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (1):137-147.
    In the opening lines of Aristophanes' Acharnians, Dicaeopolis counts first among his greatest joys ‘the five talents Cleon coughed up’, and he professes his love of the Knights for this service ‘worthy of Hellas’. The ancient scholiast gave what he thought an obvious explanation from Theopompus : he tells us that Cleon was accused of taking bribes to lighten the tribute of the islanders, and he was then fined ‘because of the outrage against the Knights’. Evidently Theopompus connected the charges (...)
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  • Curbing the Comedians: Cleon Versus Aristophanes and Syracosius' Decree.J. E. Atkinson - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (01):56-.
    There is a tendency to prune the record of restrictions on the freedom of thought and expression in fifth-century Athens. K. J. Dover has demonstrated that many of the stories of attacks on intellectuals rest on little more than flimsy speculation. Similarly there has been a reluctance to accept the historicity of the several restrictions on comedy recorded by scholiasts. Thus, for example, H. B. Mattingly has expressed doubts about Morychides' decree, and S. Halliwell has rejected Antimachus' decree as a (...)
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  • Alcibiades at Sparta: Aristophanes Birds.Michael Vickers - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (2):339-354.
    Although there is a long tradition, going back at least to the tenth century, that would see Aristophanes' Birds as somehow related to the exile in Lacedaemon of Alcibiades, and to the fortification of the Attic township of Decelea by his Spartan hosts, current scholarship surrounding Birds is firmly in the hands of those who are antipathetic to seeing the creation of Cloudcuckooland in terms of a political allegory. ‘The majority of scholars today…flatly reject a political reading’; Birds has ‘no (...)
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  • How to Avoid Being a Komodoumenos.Alan Sommerstein - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (2):327-356.
    This paper is based on two separate, though partly overlapping, registers of male Athenian citizens known to have been in the public eye between theyears 432/1 and 405/4 B.C., inclusive. Register I comprises those who are known inthis period to have held important elective public office, or to have proposed andcarried resolutions in the Assembly; a total of 176 persons. These are singled out fromthe much wider range of ‘officials’, most of them chosen by lot, to be found in theprosopography (...)
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  • Phrynichus Fr. 27 K-A: A Pun.E. L. de Boo - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (1):291-292.
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  • Was There a Decree of Syrakosios?Jeremy Trevett - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (2):598-600.
    A much-discussed fragment of Phrynichos’ comedy Monotropos, together with the comments of the scholiast on Aristophanes who preserves it, have often been taken to indicate that at some point before the production of the play, in spring 414 B.C., the Athenian politician Syrakosios moved a decree that restricted the right of comic playwrights to satirize individual Athenians. The relevant passage reads as follows.
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  • FromPonêrostoPharmakos: Theater, Social Drama, and Revolution in Athens, 428-404 BCE.David Rosenbloom - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (2):283-346.
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  • Aristophanes'Adôniazousai.L. Reitzammer - 2008 - Classical Antiquity 27 (2):282-333.
    A scholiast's note on Lysistrata mentions that there was an alternative title to the play: Adôniazousai. A close reading of the play with this title in mind reveals that Lysistrata and her allies metaphorically hold an Adonis festival atop the Acropolis. The Adonia, a festival that is typically regarded as “marginal” and “private” by modern scholars, thus becomes symbolically central and public as the sex-strike held by the women halts the Peloponnesian war. The public space of the Acropolis becomes, notionally, (...)
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  • How to Avoid Being a Komodoumenos1.Alan H. Sommerstein - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (02):327-.
    This paper is based on two separate, though partly overlapping, registers of male Athenian citizens known to have been in the public eye between theyears 432/1 and 405/4 B.C., inclusive. Register I comprises those who are known inthis period to have held important elective public office, or to have proposed andcarried resolutions in the Assembly; a total of 176 persons. These are singled out fromthe much wider range of ‘officials’, most of them chosen by lot, to be found in theprosopography (...)
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