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  1. The Cognitive Functions of Language.Peter Carruthers - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):657-674.
    This paper explores a variety of different versions of the thesis that natural language is involved in human thinking. It distinguishes amongst strong and weak forms of this thesis, dismissing some as implausibly strong and others as uninterestingly weak. Strong forms dismissed include the view that language is conceptually necessary for thought (endorsed by many philosophers) and the view that language is _de facto_ the medium of all human conceptual thinking (endorsed by many philosophers and social scientists). Weak forms include (...)
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  • Navigation as a Source of Geometric Knowledge: Young Children’s Use of Length, Angle, Distance, and Direction in a Reorientation Task.Sang Ah Lee, Valeria A. Sovrano & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2012 - Cognition 123 (1):144-161.
  • A Matter of Trust: When Landmarks and Geometry Are Used During Reorientation.Kristin R. Ratliff & Nora S. Newcombe - 2007 - In McNamara D. S. & Trafton J. G. (eds.), Proceedings of the 29th Annual Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 581.
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  • Consciousness, Art, and the Brain: Lessons From Marcel Proust.Russell Epstein - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):213-40.
    In his novel Remembrance of Things Past, Marcel Proust argues that conventional descriptions of the phenomenology of consciousness are incomplete because they focus too much on the highly-salient sensory information that dominates each moment of awareness and ignore the network of associations that lies in the background. In this paper, I explicate Proust’s theory of conscious experience and show how it leads him directly to a theory of aesthetic perception. Proust’s division of awareness into two components roughly corresponds to William (...)
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  • Language and the Development of Spatial Reasoning.Anna Shusterman & E. S. Spelke - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 89--106.
    This chapter argues that human and animal minds indeed depend on a collection of domain-specific, task-specific, and encapsulated cognitive systems: on a set of cognitive ‘modules’ in Fodor's sense. It also argues that human and animal minds are endowed with domain-general, central systems that orchestrate the information delivered by core knowledge systems. The chapter begins by reviewing the literature on spatial reorientation in animals and in young children, arguing that spatial reorientation bears the hallmarks of core knowledge and of modularity. (...)
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  • Children Reorient Using the Left/Right Sense of Coloured Landmarks at 18–24 Months.Marko Nardini, Janette Atkinson & Neil Burgess - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):519-527.
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  • Animals' Use of Landmarks and Metric Information to Reorient: Effects of the Size of the Experimental Space.Valeria Anna Sovrano, Angelo Bisazza & Giorgio Vallortigara - 2005 - Cognition 97 (2):121-133.
  • Human Spatial Representation: Insights From Animals.Ranxiao Frances Wang & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (9):376-382.
  • Biopsychologiczne podstawy poznania geometrycznego.Mateusz Hohol - 2018 - Philosophical Problems in Science 64:137-165.
    In this review-paper, I focus on biopsychological foundations of geometric cognition. Starting from the Kant’s views on mathematics, I attempt to show that contemporary cognitive scientists, alike the famous philosopher, recognize mutual relationships of visuospatial processing and geometric cognition. What I defend is a claim that Tinbergen’s explanatory questions are the most fruitful tool for explaining our “hardwired,” and thus shared with other animals, Euclidean intuitions, which manifest themselves in spatial navigation and shape recognition. I claim, however, that these “hardwired (...)
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  • How Do Young Children Determine Location? Evidence From Disorientation Tasks.Stella F. Lourenco & Janellen Huttenlocher - 2006 - Cognition 100 (3):511-529.
  • How Toddlers Represent Enclosed Spaces.Janellen Huttenlocher & Marina Vasilyeva - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (5):749-766.
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  • Orienting in Virtual Environments: How Are Surface Features and Environmental Geometry Weighted in an Orientation Task?Debbie M. Kelly & Walter F. Bischof - 2008 - Cognition 109 (1):89-104.
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  • Massive Modularity, Content Integration, and Language.Collin Rice - 2011 - Philosophy of Science 78 (5):800-812.
  • Cognitive Effects of Language on Human Navigation.Anna Shusterman, Sang Ah Lee & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2011 - Cognition 120 (2):186-201.
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  • Cognitive Effects of Language on Human Navigation.Elizabeth S. Spelke Anna Shusterman, Sang Ah Lee - 2011 - Cognition 120 (2):186.
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