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  1. An Evolutionary Metaphysics of Human Enhancement Technologies.Valentin Cheshko - manuscript
    The monograph is an English, expanded and revised version of the book Cheshko, V. T., Ivanitskaya, L.V., & Glazko, V.I. (2018). Anthropocene. Philosophy of Biotechnology. Moscow, Course. The manuscript was completed by me on November 15, 2019. It is a study devoted to the development of the concept of a stable evolutionary human strategy as a unique phenomenon of global evolution. The name “An Evolutionary Metaphysics (Cheshko, 2012; Glazko et al., 2016). With equal rights, this study could be entitled “Biotechnology (...)
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  • Queerin' the PGD Clinic.Robert Sparrow - 2013 - Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):177-196.
    Disability activists influenced by queer theory and advocates of “human enhancement” have each disputed the idea that what is “normal” is normatively significant, which currently plays a key role in the regulation of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Previously, I have argued that the only way to avoid the implication that parents have strong reasons to select children of one sex (most plausibly, female) over the other is to affirm the moral significance of sexually dimorphic human biological norms. After outlining the (...)
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  • Sexism and Human Enhancement.Robert Sparrow - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (12):732-735.
    Given the morally disastrous history of eugenics, one might have thought that contemporary advocates of genetic human enhancement would be especially mindful of the historical resonances of the arguments they put forward. Two aspects of Paula Casal's defence of enhancement against my recent criticisms are therefore more than a little surprising.1i First, her hypothetical case for sex selection for ‘moral enhancement’ relies on claims drawn from sociobiology and evolutionary psychology, which are at best controversial and at worst represent pseudo-scientific rationalisations (...)
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  • Yesterday’s Child: How Gene Editing for Enhancement Will Produce Obsolescence—and Why It Matters.Robert Sparrow - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (7):6-15.
    Despite the advent of CRISPR, safe and effective gene editing for human enhancement remains well beyond our current technological capabilities. For the discussion about enhancing human beings to be worth having, then, we must assume that gene-editing technology will improve rapidly. However, rapid progress in the development and application of any technology comes at a price: obsolescence. If the genetic enhancements we can provide children get better and better each year, then the enhancements granted to children born in any given (...)
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  • Imposing Genetic Diversity.Robert Sparrow - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (6):2-10.
    The idea that a world in which everyone was born “perfect” would be a world in which something valuable was missing often comes up in debates about the ethics of technologies of prenatal testing and preimplantation genetic diagnosis . This thought plays an important role in the “disability critique” of prenatal testing. However, the idea that human genetic variation is an important good with significant benefits for society at large is also embraced by a wide range of figures writing in (...)
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  • Genetic Diversity as a Value: Imposing Fairness.Diana Aurenque - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (6):18-20.
  • Procreative Beneficence, Diversity, Intersubjectivity, and Imprecision.Julian Savulescu - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (6):16-18.
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  • Can We Use the Notion of Normality in Genetic Selection Without Discriminating?M. D. Garasic - 2014 - Global Bioethics 25 (3):203-209.
    With the hope of somehow contributing to the ongoing discussion on the topic, this paper is loosely based on the debate that emerged from Rob Sparrow's article “Should human beings have sex? Sexual dimorphism and human enhancement”. Building on some of his arguments, my claim is that we should not refer to gender when discussing not-yet-born agents. More broadly still, my intention is to provide a further analysis of the intersection of the concepts of gender and autonomy. I will begin (...)
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  • Gender Eugenics Between Medicine, Culture, and Society.Vincent Couture, Régen Drouin, Anne-Sophie Ponsot, Frédérique Duplain-Laferrière & Chantal Bouffard - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):57 - 59.
  • For the Sake of “Normality”? Medical Indication, Social Justification, and the Welfare of Children.Diana Aurenque & Hans-Jörg Ehni - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (10):55 - 57.
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  • Is There a Moral Obligation to Have Children of Only One Sex?Kalina Kamenova - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):26-27.
  • Sexual Dimorphism and the Value of Feminist Bioethics.Nancy J. Matchett - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):18-20.
    Robert Sparrow has recently claimed that unless there are reasons to think the sexed nature of human beings is normatively significant, current trends in bioethical reasoning force the conclusion that “we may do well to move toward a ‘post sex’ humanity” (American Journal of Bioethics 10: 7 (2010)). This commentary uses basic methodological principles from feminist ethics to argue that he has, in fact, given no reasons to think that a 'post sex' humanity is any more valuable than gender diverse (...)
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  • Resisting Sparrow's Sexy Reductio : Selection Principles and the Social Good.Simon Rippon, Pablo Stafforini, Katrien Devolder, Russell Powell & Thomas Douglas - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):16-18.
    Principles of procreative beneficence (PPBs) hold that parents have good reasons to select the child with the best life prospects. Sparrow (2010) claims that PPBs imply that we should select only female children, unlesswe attach normative significance to “normal” human capacities. We argue that this claim fails on both empirical and logical grounds. Empirically, Sparrow’s argument for greater female wellbeing rests on a selective reading of the evidence and the incorrect assumption that an advantage for females would persist even when (...)
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  • The Risks of “Sexual Normalcy”.Ronald M. Green - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):13-14.
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  • The Value of Sex in Procreative Reasons.Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):22-24.
  • Sex and Enhancement: A Phenomenological–Existential View.Guy Widdershoven, Annemie Halsema & Jenny Slatman - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):20-22.
  • This Is What Happens When You Forget About Gender.Dan O'Connor - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):27-29.
  • Sexual Dimorphism and Sexual Intermediaries.Thomas Marino - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):24-25.
  • Why Bioethicists Still Need to Think More About Sex ….Robert Sparrow - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):W1-W3.
  • Humans Should Be Free of All Biological Limitations Including Sex.James J. Hughes - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):15-15.
  • Sexual Dimorphism and Human Enhancement.P. Casal - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (12):722-728.
    Robert Sparrow argues that because of women's longer life expectancy philosophers who advocate the genetic modification of human beings to enhance welfare rather than merely supply therapy are committed to favouring the selection of only female embryos, an implication he deems sufficiently implausible to discredit their position. If Sparrow's argument succeeds, then philosophers who advocate biomedical moral enhancement also seem vulnerable to a similar charge because of men's greater propensity for various forms of harmful wrongdoing. This paper argues there are (...)
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