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  1. Astronomy and Observation in Plato's Republic.Andrew Gregory - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (4):451-471.
    Plato's comments on astronomy and the education of the guardians at Republic 528e ff have been hotly disputed, and have provoked much criticism from those who have interpreted them as a rejection or denigration of observational astronomy. Here I argue that the key to interpreting these comments lies in the relationship between the conception of enquiry that is implicit in the epistemological allegories, and the programme for the education of the guardians that Plato subsequently proposes. We have, I suggest, been (...)
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  • Divine Confirmation: Plato, Timaeus 55c7–D6.Federico M. Petrucci - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-5.
    Burnet's text at Pl. Ti. 55c7–d6 is at least questionable, and opting for a different reading at 55d5 would shed light on an intriguing argumentative aspect of Plato's cosmological account: God confirms the metaphysical reasons why there is just one perfect world.
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  • Aisthēsis, Reason and Appetite in the Timaeus.Emily Fletcher - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (4):397-434.
  • Eros and Necessity in the Ascent From the Cave.Rachel Barney - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):357-72.
    A generally ignored feature of Plato’s celebrated image of the cave in Republic VII is that the ascent from the cave is, in its initial stages, said to be brought about by force. What kind of ‘force’ is this, and why is it necessary? This paper considers three possible interpretations, and argues that each may have a role to play.
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  • On the Dimensionality of Surfaces, Solids, and Spaces.Ernest W. Adams - 1986 - Erkenntnis 24 (2):137 - 201.
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  • Proclus on Nature: Philosophy of Nature and its Methods in Proclus’ Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus.Marije Martijn - 2010 - Brill.
    One of the hardest questions to answer for a (Neo)platonist is to what extent and how the changing and unreliable world of sense perception can itself be an object of scientific knowledge. My dissertation is a study of the answer given to that question by the Neoplatonist Proclus (Athens, 411-485) in his Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus. I present a new explanation of Proclus’ concept of nature and show that philosophy of nature consists of several related subdisciplines matching the ontological stratification (...)
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  • Ontological Symmetry in Plato: Formless Things and Empty Forms.Necip Fikri Alican - 2017 - Analysis and Metaphysics 16:7–51.
    This is a study of the correspondence between Forms and particulars in Plato. The aim is to determine whether they exhibit an ontological symmetry, in other words, whether there is always one where there is the other. This points to two questions, one on the existence of things that do not have corresponding Forms, the other on the existence of Forms that do not have corresponding things. Both questions have come up before. But the answers have not been sufficiently sensitive (...)
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  • Star Music: The Ancient Idea of Cosmic Music as a Philosophical Paradox.E. Heyning - manuscript
    This thesis regards the ancient Pythagorean-Platonic idea of heavenly harmony as a philosophical paradox: stars are silent, music is not. The idea of ‘star music’ contains several potential opposites, including imagination and sense perception, the temporal and the eternal, transcendence and theophany, and others. The idea of ‘star music’ as a paradox can become a gateway to a different understanding of the universe, and a vehicle for a shift to a new – and yet very ancient – form of consciousness. (...)
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  • Where Epistemology and Religion Meet What Do(Es) the God(s) Look Like?Maria Michela Sassi - 2013 - Rhizomata 1 (2):283-307.
    The focus of this essay is on Xenophanes’ criticism of anthropomorphic representation of the gods, famously sounding like a declaration of war against a constituent part of the Greek religion, and adopting terms and a tone that are unequalled amongst “pre-Socratic” authors for their directness and explicitness. While the main features of Xenophanes’ polemic are well known thanks to some of the most studied fragments of the pre-Socratic tradition, a different line of enquiry from the usual one is attempted by (...)
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  • Argumentative Strategies for Interpreting Plato’s Cosmogony: Taurus and the Issue of Literalism in Antiquity.Federico M. Petrucci - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (1):43-59.
    _ Source: _Volume 61, Issue 1, pp 43 - 59 Contemporary debate on Plato’s cosmogony often assumes that the ‘literal’ reading of the _Timaeus_ yields an account of creation, while the view that the cosmos always existed is non-literal. In antiquity, Taurus has been seen as a forerunner of the ‘non-literal’ interpretation. This paper shows, on the contrary, that Taurus’ argument for the sempiternity of the cosmos is a literalist one, relying on a strict linguistic analysis of _Timaeus_ 28b6-8.
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  • Plato’s Pilot in the Political Strategy of Julian and Libanius.David Neal Greenwood - 2017 - Classical Quarterly 67 (2):607-616.
    The rhetorical career of Libanius of Antioch spanned the reigns of a number of fourth-century emperors. Like many orators, he used the trope of the emperor as a pilot, steering the ship of state. He did this for his imperial exemplar Julian and in fact for his predecessor Constantius II as well. Julian sought to craft an identity for himself as a theocratic king. He and his supporters cast him as an earthly parallel to the Christ-like versions of Heracles and (...)
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  • Plato's Doxa.Jessica Moss - 2020 - Analytic Philosophy 61 (3):193-217.
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  • Explanation and Teleology in Aristotle's Philosophy of Nature.Mariska Elisabeth Maria Philomena Johannes Leunissen - unknown
    This dissertation explores Aristotle’s use of teleology as a principle of explanation, especially as it is used in the natural treatises. Its main purposes are, first, to determine the function, structure, and explanatory power of teleological explanations in four of Aristotle’s natural treatises, that is, in Physica (book II), De Anima, De Partibus Animalium (including the practice in books II-IV), and De Caelo (book II). Its second purpose is to confront these findings about Aristotle’s practice in the natural treatises with (...)
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  • Why the Cosmos Needs a Craftsman: Plato, Timaeus 27d5-29b1.Thomas Kjeller Johansen - 2014 - Phronesis 59 (4):297-320.
    In his opening speech, Timaeus argues that the cosmos must be the product of a craftsman looking to an eternal paradigm. Yet his premises seem at best to justify only that the world could have been made by such a craftsman. This paper seeks to clarify Timaeus’ justification for his stronger conclusion. It is argued that Timaeus sees a necessary role for craftsmanship as a cause that makes becoming like being.
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  • Plato as Prophet.Robert J. Taormina - 2019 - Open Journal for Studies in Philosophy 3 (2):25-36.
    This article endeavors to ascertain whether Plato may be regarded as a prophet. This involves defining what a prophet is and examining a number of literary sources in order to uncover the needed evidence and to make appropriate comparisons with known prophets from ancient times. Thus, this treatise includes evidence obtained from several classic texts, plus excerpts of Plato’s writings, life experiences, influence from Socrates, and Plato’s foreign travels. Also considered are biblical passages about prophets from the Old Testament. Thereby, (...)
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  • Putting Cosmogony Into Words: The Neoplatonists on Metaphysics and Discourse.Anna Motta - 2019 - Peitho 10 (1):113-132.
    The present paper focuses on some aspects of the Neoplatonist literary-metaphysical theory, which has clearly been expressed in the anony­mous Prolegomena to Plato’s philosophy and further confirmed in Proclus’ exegesis of the Timaeus. Thus, this contribution, examines and compares several passages from the Prolegomena and from Proclus’ Commentary on the Timaeus with a view to showing that it is legiti­mate to speak of a certain cosmogony of the Platonic dialogue that is analogous to that of the macrocosm. Moreover, the analogy (...)
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  • Tımaıos Diyaloğunun Etik-Politik Okuması?Adnan Akan - 2016 - Ethos: Dialogues in Philosophy and Social Sciences 9 (2).
    Timaios diyalogu, genellikle Platon’un kozmolojik ve teolojik bir metni olarak ele alınır. Metin ilk bakışta evrenin ve insanın kökeni sorununu Tanrı’nın mahiyeti çerçevesinde ele alan bir diyalog olmasına karşın temelde etik-politik değerlerin kozmik bir anlatıya ve Tanrı’nın varlık ve niteliğine dayanılarak savunulmasını içerir. Bununla birlikte Platon’un metafizik sisteminde insan-polis-kozmos birbirinden kopmaz bir şekilde bağlantılı bir duruma sahiptir. Bundan ötürüdür ki Timaios diyalogu etik-politikanın kozmoloji ve teolojiyle iç içe geçtiği bir metindir. Bizim göstermek istediğimiz evrenin kuruluş sürecinin nasılından ziyade bu anlatının (...)
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  • Making the World Body Whole and Complete: Plato's Timaeus, 32c5-33b1.Brad Berman - 2016 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 10 (2):168-192.
    Plato’s demiurge makes a series of questionable decisions in creating the world. Most notoriously, he endeavors to replicate, to the extent possible, some of the features that his model possesses just insofar as it is a Form. This has provoked the colorful complaint that the demiurge is as raving mad as a general contractor who constructs a house of vellum to better realize the architect’s vellum plans (Keyt 1971). The present paper considers the sanity of the demiurge’s reasoning in light (...)
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  • La escala del tiempo. El concepto pitagórico de analogía en la definición de tiempo platónicoaristotélica.Martín Simesen de Bielke - 2017 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 27:96-124.
    RESUMEN Este artículo apunta a someter a consideración si existe o no un fundamento histórico-filosófico para la hipótesis de una homonimia no azarosa entre "escala de tiempo" y "escala musical". Un examen minucioso de ciertos pasajes del diálogo Timeo muestra que Platón fue el primero en sentar las bases para el concepto de tiempo, definido como número, al incorporar el concepto de 'analogía' o proporción, el cual fue desarrollado por los pitagóricos en el marco místico y teórico de los principios (...)
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  • Van Den Berg/Gabor Bibliography.Editors Proceedings of the Boston Ar - 2013 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):238-240.
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  • Timaeus 38A8–B5.Harold Cherniss - 1957 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 77 (1):18-23.
    In a recent article written by Mr. G. E. L. Owen to prove that contrary to the general current opinion the composition of theTimaeusmust have antedated that of theParmenidesand its dialectical successors, it is contended that when theTimaeuswas written the analysis of negation given in theSophistcould not yet have been worked out. ‘For’, Mr. Owen writes, ‘the tenet on which the whole new account of negation is based, namely thatτὸ μὴ ὄν ἔστιν ὄντως μὴ ὄν, is contradicted unreservedly by Timaeus' (...)
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  • Zeus in Aeschylus.Hugh Lloyd-Jones - 1956 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 76:55-67.
    After a hundred and thirty years of controversy, the interpretation of thePrometheus Boundis still the subject of debate. To the romantic poets of the revolutionary era, the Titan tortured by Zeus for his services to mankind appeared as a symbol of the human spirit in its struggle to throw off the chains which priests and kings had forged for it. But to the distinguished Hellenists who after the fall of Napoleon laid the foundations of the great century of German scholarship, (...)
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  • Creso y Solón en el espejo de la Atlántida platónica.Ivana Costa - 2007 - Synthesis (la Plata) 14:71-89.
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  • Conceptualizing the ‘Female’ Soul – a Study in Plato and Proclus.Jana Schultz - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (5):883-901.
    ABSTRACTWithin the Platonic dualistic conception of body and soul the difference between maleness and femaleness might appear to be a difference which only concerns the body, that is a difference which is not essential for determining who a certain human is. One might argue that, since humans are essentially their souls and souls are genderless, men and women are essentially equal. As my paper shows, though, Plato's and Proclus’ writings set out two ways of conceptualizing human souls themselves as ‘sexed’ (...)
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  • Probable New Fragments and a Testimonium From Galen's Commentary on Plato's Timaevs.Aileen R. Das - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):384-401.
    As his writings tend to prioritize the incorporeal over the corporeal, Plato seems an unlikely authority on medicine. He does not appear to have engaged in any systematic investigation of the body through direct examination of animal anatomy, like his pupil Aristotle. Notwithstanding Plato's apparent lack of interest in anatomical research, modern scholars view his dialogues as valuable witnesses for earlier and contemporary theories about the body. Famously, the Phaedrus mentions Hippocrates’ holistic approach to studying the body. Out of all (...)
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  • Μεσοτησ in Plato's Laws 746a6–7.Roberto Grasso - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):443-446.
    In the fifth book of Plato's Laws, the Athenian stranger concedes that some requirements posed in the description of the ideal city might be unrealistically demanding. The passage quotes the due limits fixed with regard to wealth and the regulations about the number of children and the size of the family, as well as the rules to be observed in the allocation of houses in the city and in the countryside. The latter requirement is recalled at 746a6–7, where the word (...)
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  • An Epitome of Galen's on the Elements Ascribed to Ḥunayn Ibn Isḥāq.Gerrit Bos & Y. Tzvi Langermann - 2015 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 25 (1):33-78.
    Galen'sOn the Elements according to Hippocratesis an important source for physical doctrines circulating in late antiquity. The variety of atomistic doctrines that Galen brings into the discussion, as well as his arguments aimed at refuting them, were closely studied by the early kalām atomists. Of particular interest are the summaries of this text, which seem to have been written many centuries after Galen; some of them are products of early Islamicate culture. In this paper, we present an edition, translation, and (...)
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  • Plato and the Arxh Kakwn.M. Meldrum - 1950 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 70:65-74.
  • Solstices, Equinoxes, & the Presocratics.D. R. Dicks - 1966 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 86:26-40.
  • Plato's Atlantis Story and Fourth-Century Ideology: Designer History.Kathryn A. Morgan - 1998 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 118:101-118.
  • Designer History: Plato's Atlantis Story and Fourth-Century Ideology.Kathryn A. Morgan - 1998 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 118:101-118.
  • A Religious Function of Greek Tragedy.R. P. Winnington-Ingram - 1954 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 74:16-24.
  • Plato as a Natural Scientist.Geoffrey Ernest Richard Lloyd - 1968 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 88:78-92.
  • Phaedo III C 4 Ff.Thomas G. Rosenmeyer - 1956 - Classical Quarterly 6 (3-4):193-.
    The publication of Mr. R. S. Bluck's stimulating Phaedo prompts me to ask the following questions concerning the traditional interpretation of the cosmographical passage beginning 108 e. Do the terms of 108 e-109 a in combination with 110 b 5 ff. and Timaeus 40 b-c and 62 d ff. prove conclusively that in the Phaedo Plato thinks of the earth as a spherical body? Granted that he does, need his description of the earth, as a setting for his eschatological myth, (...)
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  • Phaedo III C 4 Ff.Thomas G. Rosenmeyer - 1956 - Classical Quarterly 6 (3-4):193-197.
    The publication of Mr. R. S. Bluck's stimulating Phaedo prompts me to ask the following questions concerning the traditional interpretation of the cosmographical passage beginning 108 e. Do the terms of 108 e-109 a in combination with 110 b 5 ff. and Timaeus 40 b-c and 62 d ff. prove conclusively that in the Phaedo Plato thinks of the earth as a spherical body? Granted that he does, need his description of the earth, as a setting for his eschatological myth, (...)
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  • Historical Commitments of Biology.A. C. Crombie - 1966 - British Journal for the History of Science 3 (2):97-108.
    By an ancient and honourable tradition, which began last year when I spared you this exercise, the President gives a Presidential Address only once during his term of office, on retirement. A presidential address in the summer season is a privileged occasion. Coming at the end of an active day, it is not the moment for a massive account of research. Rather it is an occasion when one may indulge with privilege in some directed impressionism, and that is what I (...)
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  • On the Applicability of Mathematics to Nature: Roger Bacon and His Predecessors.David C. Lindberg - 1982 - British Journal for the History of Science 15 (1):3-25.
    Roger Bacon has often been victimized by his friends, who have exaggerated and distorted his place in the history of mathematics. He has too often been viewed as the first, or one of the first, to grasp the possibilities and promote the cause of modern mathematical physics. Even those who have noticed that Bacon was more given to the praise than to the practice of mathematics have seen in his programmatic statements an anticipation of seventeenth-century achievements. But if we judge (...)
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  • Plato on Perception and ‘Commons’.Allan Silverman - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (1):148-175.
    On the face of it, Plato's treatment of aisthesis is decidedly ambiguous. Sometimes he treats aisthesis as a faculty which, though distinct from all rational capacities, is nonetheless capable of forming judgments such as ‘This stick is bent’ or ‘The same thing is hard and soft’. In the Theaetetus, however, he appears to separate aisthesis from judgment, isolating the former from all prepositional, identificatory and recognitional capacities. The dilemma is easily expressed: Is perception a judgmental or cognitive capacity, or is (...)
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  • Punishment and the Physiology of the Timaeus.R. F. Stalley - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (2):357-370.
    It hardly needs to be said that the parallel between mental and physical health plays an important part in Plato's moral philosophy. One of the central claims of the Republicis that justice is to the soul what health is to the body.1 Similar points are made in other dialogues.2 This analogy between health and sickness on the one hand and virtue and vice on the other is closely connected to the so–called Socratic paradoxes. Throughout his life Plato seems to have (...)
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  • Penser L’Espace D’Après le Parménide.Marc-Antoine Gavray - 2014 - Dialogue 53 (3):521-537.
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  • A Triptych in Plato's Timaeus: A Note on the Receptacle Passage.T. K. Johansen - 2015 - Classical Quarterly 65 (2):885-886.
  • Truth, Virtue and Beauty: Midwifery and Philosophy.Judith M. Parker & Martin Gibbs - 1998 - Nursing Inquiry 5 (3):146-153.
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