Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Proceedings of Sinn Und Bedeutung 9.Emar Maier, Corien Bary & Janneke Huitink (eds.) - 2005 - Nijmegen Centre for Semantics.
  • Conversational Exculpature.Daniel Hoek - 2018 - Philosophical Review 127 (2):151-196.
    Conversational exculpature is a pragmatic process whereby information is subtracted from, rather than added to, what the speaker literally says. This pragmatic content subtraction explains why we can say “Rob is six feet tall” without implying that Rob is between 5'0.99" and 6'0.01" tall, and why we can say “Ellen has a hat like the one Sherlock Holmes always wears” without implying Holmes exists or has a hat. This article presents a simple formalism for understanding this pragmatic mechanism, specifying how, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Getting what you want.Lyndal Grant & Milo Phillips-Brown - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 177 (7):1791-1810.
    It is commonly accepted that if an agent wants p, then she has a desire that is satisfied in exactly the worlds where p is true. Call this the ‘Satisfaction-is-Truth Principle’. We argue that this principle is false: an agent may want p without having a desire that is satisfied when p obtains in any old way. For example, Millie wants to drink milk but does not have a desire that is satisfied when she drinks spoiled milk. Millie has a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Thinking About the Idea of Consent in Data Science Genomics: How ‘Informed’ is It?Jennifer Greenwood & Andrew Crowden - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Vague, So Untrue.David Braun & Theodore Sider - 2007 - Noûs 41 (2):133 - 156.
    According to an old and attractive view, vagueness must be eliminated before semantic notions — truth, implication, and so on — may be applied. This view was accepted by Frege, but is rarely defended nowadays.1 This..
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  • Conversational Implicature, Communicative Intentions, and Content.Ray Buchanan - 2013 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (5):720-740.
    (2013). Conversational implicature, communicative intentions, and content. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 43, Essays on the Nature of Propositions, pp. 720-740.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Democratic Deliberation Within.Robert E. Goodin - 2000 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 29 (1):81-109.
  • Belief, Rational and Justified.Robert Weston Siscoe - forthcoming - Mind:fzaa021.
    It is clear that beliefs can be assessed both as to their justification and as to their rationality. What is not as clear, however, is how the rationality and justification of belief relate to one another. Stewart Cohen has stumped for the popular proposal that rationality and justification come to the same thing, that rational beliefs just are justified beliefs, supporting his view by arguing that ‘justified belief’ and ‘rational belief’ are synonymous. In this paper, I will give reason to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Unidirectionality in Precisification.Peter Klecha - 2018 - Linguistics and Philosophy 41 (1):87-124.
    This paper provides a formal pragmatic analysis of precision which accounts for its essential properties, but also for Lewis’s :339–359, 1979) observation of asymmetry in how standards of precision may shift due to normal discourse moves: Only up, not down. I propose that shifts of the kind observed and discussed by Lewis are in fact cases of underlying disagreement about the standard of precision, which is only revealed when one interlocutor uses an expression which signals their adherence to a higher (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Loose Talk, Scale Presuppositions and QUD.Daniel Hoek - 2019 - In Julian J. Schlöder, Dean McHugh & Floris Roelofsen (eds.), Proceedings of the 22nd Amsterdam Colloquium. pp. 171-180.
    I present a new pragmatic theory of loose talk, focussing on the loose use of numbers and measurement expressions. The account explains loose readings as arising from a pragmatic mechanism aimed at restoring relevance to the question under discussion (QUD), appealing to Krifka's notion of a measurement scale. The core motivating observation is that the loose reading of a claim need not be weaker than its literal content, as almost all pragmatic treatments of loose talk have assumed (e.g. Lasersohn). The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • XIII-Metaphor: Ad Hoc Concepts, Literal Meaning and Mental Images.Robyn Carston - 2010 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 110 (3_pt_3):295-321.
    I propose that an account of metaphor understanding which covers the full range of cases has to allow for two routes or modes of processing. One is a process of rapid, local, on-line concept construction that applies quite generally to the recovery of word meaning in utterance comprehension. The other requires a greater focus on the literal meaning of sentences or texts, which is metarepresented as a whole and subjected to more global, reflective pragmatic inference. The questions whether metaphors convey (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • The Relevance of Relevance for Fiction.Anne Reboul - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):729.
  • The Role of Literal Meaning in Figurative Language Comprehension: Evidence From Masked Priming ERP.Hanna Weiland, Valentina Bambini & Petra B. Schumacher - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Donnellan's Misdescriptions and Loose Talk.Carlo Penco - 2017 - In Kepa Korta Maria De Ponte (ed.), Reference and Representation in Language and Thought. Oxford (UK): Oxford University Press. pp. 104-125.
    Keith Donnellan wrote his paper on definite descriptions in 1966 at Cornell University, an environment where nearly everybody was discussing Wittgenstein’s ideas of meaning as use. However, his idea of different uses of definite descriptions became one of the fundamental tenets against descriptivism, which was considered one of the main legacies of the Frege–Russell– Wittgenstein view; and I wonder whether a more Wittgensteinian interpretation of Donnellan’s work is possible.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Showing, Telling and Seeing.Elisabeth Camp - 2007 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 3 (1):1-24.
    Theorists often associate certain “poetic” qualities with metaphor – most especially, producing an open-ended, holistic perspective which is evocative, imagistic and affectively-laden. I argue that, on the one hand, non-cognitivists are wrong to claim that metaphors only produce such perspectives: like ordinary literal speech, they also serve to undertake claims and other speech acts with propositional content. On the other hand, contextualists are wrong to assimilate metaphor to literal loose talk: metaphors depend on using one thing as a perspective for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Higher-Order Free Logic and the Prior-Kaplan Paradox.Andrew Bacon, John Hawthorne & Gabriel Uzquiano - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (4-5):493-541.
    The principle of universal instantiation plays a pivotal role both in the derivation of intensional paradoxes such as Prior’s paradox and Kaplan’s paradox and the debate between necessitism and contingentism. We outline a distinctively free logical approach to the intensional paradoxes and note how the free logical outlook allows one to distinguish two different, though allied themes in higher-order necessitism. We examine the costs of this solution and compare it with the more familiar ramificationist approaches to higher-order logic. Our assessment (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Denying Knowledge.Esben Nedenskov Petersen - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):36-55.
    Intuitions about contextualist cases such as Cohen’s airport case pose a problem for classical anti-skeptical versions of invariantism. Recently, Tim Black, Jessica Brown, and Patrick Rysiew have argued that the classical invariantist can respond by arguing that pragmatic aspects of epistemic discourse are responsible for the relevant problematic intuitions. This paper identifies the mechanisms of conversational implicature and impliciture as the basic sources of hope for this explanatory strategy. It then argues that neither of these sources provides the classical invariantist (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Evaluating Contemporary Models of Figurative Language Understanding.Raymond Gibbs - 2001 - Metaphor and Symbol 16 (3):317-333.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Incorrect Understanding and Concept Possession.Halvor Nordby - 2004 - Philosophical Explorations 7 (1):55-70.
    Tyler Burge has argued that an incorrect understanding of a word can be sufficient for possessing the concept the word literally expresses. His well-known 'arthritis' case involves a patient who understands 'arthritis' incorrectly, but who nevertheless, according to Burge, possesses the concept arthritis. Critics of Burge have objected that there is an alternative concept that best matches the patient's understanding and that this, therefore, is the patient's concept. The paper first argues that Burge's response to this objection is unconvincing. A (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • A Delineation Solution to the Puzzles of Absolute Adjectives.Heather Burnett - 2014 - Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (1):1-39.
    The paper presents both new data and a new analysis of the semantic and pragmatic properties of the class of absolute scalar adjectives within an extension of a well-known logical framework for the analysis of gradable predicates: the delineation semantics framework . It has been long observed that the context-sensitivity, vagueness and gradability features of absolute scalar predicates give rise to certain puzzles for their analysis within most, if not all, modern formal semantic frameworks. While there exist proposals for solving (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Relevance and “Pseudo-Imperatives”.Billy Clark - 1993 - Linguistics and Philosophy 16 (1):79 - 121.
  • Meaning and Context in Children's Understanding of Gradable Adjectives.K. Syrett, C. Kennedy & J. Lidz - 2010 - Journal of Semantics 27 (1):1-35.
    This paper explores what children and adults know about three specific ways that meaning and context interact: the interpretation of expressions whose extensions vary in different contexts ; conditions on the felicitous use of expressions in a discourse context and informative uses of expressions in contexts in which they strictly speaking do not apply. The empirical focus is the use of unmodified gradable adjectives in definite descriptions to distinguish between two objects that differ in the degree to which they possess (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Metaphor, Relevance and the 'Emergent Property' Issue.Deirdre Wilson & Robyn Carston - 2006 - Mind and Language 21 (3):404-433.
    The interpretation of metaphorical utterances often results in the attribution of emergent properties, which are neither standardly associated with the individual constituents in isolation nor derivable by standard rules of semantic composition. An adequate pragmatic account of metaphor interpretation must explain how these properties are derived. Using the framework of relevance theory, we propose a wholly inferential account, and argue that the derivation of emergent properties involves no special interpretive mechanisms not required for the interpretation of ordinary, literal utterances.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • On Interpreting “Interpretive Use”.N. V. Smith - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):734.
  • The Information Needed for Inference.Carlota S. Smith - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):733.
  • Rationality as an Explanation of Language?Stuart J. Russell - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):730.
  • Metaphor in the Mind: The Cognition of Metaphor.Elisabeth Camp - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (2):154-170.
    Philosophers have often adopted a dismissive attitude toward metaphor. Hobbes (1651, ch. 8) advocated excluding metaphors from rational discourse because they “openly profess deceit,” while Locke (1690, Bk. 3, ch. 10) claimed that figurative uses of language serve only “to insinuate wrong ideas, move the passions, and thereby mislead the judgment; and so indeed are perfect cheats.” Later, logical positivists like Ayer and Carnap assumed that because metaphors like..
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Relevance and Argumentation: How Bald Can You Get. [REVIEW]Anne Reboul - 1989 - Argumentation 3 (3):285-302.
    This paper is concerned with vagueness in language, its relation to logico-philosophical questions on the one hand, and to so-called syncategorematic terms and their linguistic use on the other hand. It attempts to show that it is not language itself which is vague but rather the way we use it.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Presumptions of Relevance.Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):736.
  • How Relevant?Pieter A. M. Seuren - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):731.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Metaphor, Literal, Literalism.Stern Josef - 2006 - Mind Language 21 (3):243-279.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Translation and Relevance: Cognition and Context.Kirsten Malmkjaer - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (3):298-309.
  • Thoughts and Belief Ascriptions.Pierre Jacob - 1987 - Mind and Language 2 (4):301-325.
  • Metaphor and What is Said.Catherine Wearing - 2006 - Mind and Language 21 (3):310–332.
    In this paper, I argue for an account of metaphorical content as what is said when a speaker utters a metaphor. First, I show that two other possibilities—the Gricean account of metaphor as implicature and the strictly semantic account developed by Josef Stern—face several serious problems. In their place, I propose an account that takes metaphorical content to cross-cut the semantic-pragmatic distinction. This requires re-thinking the notion of metaphorical content, as well as the relation between the metaphorical and the literal.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Metaphor, Relevance and the 'Emergent Property' Issue.Deirdre Wilson & Robyn Carston - 2006 - Mind and Language 21 (3):404–433.
    The interpretation of metaphorical utterances often results in the attribution of emergent properties, which are neither standardly associated with the individual constituents in isolation nor derivable by standard rules of semantic composition. An adequate pragmatic account of metaphor interpretation must explain how these properties are derived. Using the framework of relevance theory, we propose a wholly inferential account, and argue that the derivation of emergent properties involves no special interpretive mechanisms not required for the interpretation of ordinary, literal utterances.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Relevance Must Be to Someone.Yorick Wilks - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):735.
  • Literalness and Other Pragmatic Principles.François Recanati - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):729-730.
  • Beyond Words: Communication, Truthfulness, and Understanding.Patrick Rysiew - 2007 - Episteme 4 (3):285-304.
    Testimony is an indispensable source of information. Yet, contrary to ‘literalism’, speakers rarely mean just what they say; and even when they do, that itself is something the hearer needs to realize. So, understanding instances of testimony requires more than merely reading others' messages off of the words they utter. Further, a very familiar and theoretically well-entrenched approach to how we arrive at such understanding serves to emphasize, not merely how deeply committed we are to testimony as a reliable source (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Inference and Information.Philip Pettit - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):727.