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  1. Critical Environmental Justice and the Nature of the Firm.Ian Carrillo & David Pellow - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):815-826.
    The critical environmental justice framework contends that inequalities are sustained through intersecting social categories, multi-scalarity, the perceived expendability of marginalized populations, and state-vested power. While this approach offers new pathways for environmental justice research, it overlooks the role of firms, suggesting a departure from long-standing political-economic theories, such as the treadmill of production, which elevate the importance of producers. In focusing on firms, we ask: how do firms operationalize diverse social forces to produce environmental injustice? What organizational logics sustain these (...)
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  • Sympathy for Cecil: Gender, Trophy Hunting, and the Western Environmental Imaginary.Eric S. Godoy - 2020 - Journal of Political Ecology 27 (1):759-774.
    This article draws from political ecology and ecofeminism to examine sympathy, expressed by record-breaking donations from North Americans, for the death of Cecil the Lion. The overlapping normative critique offered by these two perspectives together demonstrates how sympathy is disclosive of power relations. Sympathy reveals, relies upon, and reinforces different forms of gender, racial, and neocolonial domination; especially when western sympathy remains ignorant of the power relations, including their politics and histories, that shape attitudes toward non-human animals and grant them (...)
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  • The Reintroduction and Reinterpretation of the Wild.Eileen O'Rourke - 2000 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (1):144-165.
    This paper is concerned with changing social representations of the ``wild,'' in particular wild animals. We argue that within a contemporary Western context the old agricultural perception of wild animals as adversarial and as a threat to domestication, is being replaced by an essentially urban fascination with certain emblematic wild animals, who are seen to embody symbols of naturalness and freedom. On closer examination that carefully mediatized ``naturalness'' may be but another form of domestication. After an historical overview of the (...)
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  • Slaves, Fetuses, and Animals.William David Hart - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (4):661-690.
    This essay is an exploration in ethical rhetoric, specifically, the ethics of comparing the status of fetuses and animals to enslaved Africans. On the view of those who make such comparisons, the fetus is treated as a slave through abortion, reproductive technologies, and stem cell research, while animals are enslaved through factory farming, experimentation, and as laborers, circus performers, and the like. I explore how the apotheosis of the fetus and the humanization of animals represent the flipside of the subjugation (...)
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  • Abolition Then and Now: Tactical Comparisons Between the Human Rights Movement and the Modern Nonhuman Animal Rights Movement in the United States. [REVIEW]Corey Lee Wrenn - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):177-200.
    This article discusses critical comparisons between the human and nonhuman abolitionist movements in the United States. The modern nonhuman abolitionist movement is, in some ways, an extension of the anti-slavery movement of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the ongoing human Civil Rights movement. As such, there is considerable overlap between the two movements, specifically in the need to simultaneously address property status and oppressive ideology. Despite intentional appropriation of terminology and numerous similarities in mobilization efforts, there has been disappointingly (...)
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  • The Animal Challenge to Sociology.Nickie Charles & Bob Carter - 2018 - European Journal of Social Theory 21 (1):79-97.
    In this article, we ask why is it that sociology has been slow to take up the animal challenge, and ask what would happen if it did. We argue that sociology’s fraught relationship with biology, its assumptions about human exceptionalism and its emergence in the context of industrialization and urbanization are key to understanding its lack of attention to animals and contribute to a limited conceptualization of society. This can be remedied by viewing non-human animals as involuntarily embedded in social (...)
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  • Reproducing Dominion: Emotional Apprenticeship in the 4-H Youth Livestock Program.Colter Ellis & Leslie Irvine - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (1):21-39.
    This paper examines young people’s socialization into the doctrine known as “dominionism,” which justifies the use of animals in the service of human beings. Using qualitative research, it focuses on the 4-H youth livestock program, in which boys and girls raise cattle, pigs, goats, and sheep for slaughter. The analysis portrays 4-H as an apprenticeship in which children learn to do cognitive emotion work, use distancing mechanisms, and create a “redemption” narrative to cope with contradictory ethical and emotional experiences. Although (...)
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  • Animal Publics: Accounting for Heterogeneity in Political Life.Gwendolyn Blue & Melanie Rock - 2014 - Society and Animals 22 (5):503-519.
    To what extent do non-human animals participate in that particular political configuration known as a public? While conventional wisdom about publics is predicated on a vision of political agency that privileges discursive and deliberative processes, recent scholarship situated in the material turn in the social sciences and humanities challenges the notion that publics are purely human and constituted exclusively through language. With these theorizations as a backdrop, this paper takes into consideration the multiple species that are implicated in political life (...)
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  • We Are What We Eat: Feminist Vegetarianism and the Reproduction of Racial Identity.Cathryn Bailey - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):39-59.
    : In this article, Bailey analyzes the relationship between ethical vegetarianism (or the claim that ethical vegetarianism is morally right for all people) and white racism (the claim that white solipsistic and possibly white privileged ethical claims are imperialistically or insensitively universalized over less privileged human lives). This plays out in the dreaded comparison of animals with people of color and Jews as exemplified in the PETA campaign and the need for human identification (or solidarity) with animals in ethical vegetarianism. (...)
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  • We Are What We Eat: Feminist Vegetarianism and the Reproduction of Racial Identity.Cathryn Bailey - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):39-59.
    In this article, Bailey analyzes the relationship between ethical vegetarianism and white racism. This plays out in the dreaded comparison of animals with people of color and Jews as exemplified in the PETA campaign and the need for human identification with animals in ethical vegetarianism. To support the viability of ethical vegetarianism, Bailey resolves the dread of this comparison by locating ethical vegetarianism as a strategy of resistance to classist, racist, heterosexist, and colonialist systems of power that often rely on (...)
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  • We Are What We Eat: Feminist Vegetarianism and the Reproduction of Racial Identity.Cathryn Bailey - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):39-59.
    In this article, Bailey analyzes the relationship between ethical vegetarianism and white racism. This plays out in the dreaded comparison of animals with people of color and Jews as exemplified in the PETA campaign and the need for human identification with animals in ethical vegetarianism. To support the viability of ethical vegetarianism, Bailey resolves the dread of this comparison by locating ethical vegetarianism as a strategy of resistance to classist, racist, heterosexist, and colonialist systems of power that often rely on (...)
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  • Disturbing Images: Peta and the Feminist Ethics of Animal Advocacy.Maneesha Deckha - 2008 - Ethics and the Environment 13 (2):pp. 35-76.
    The author applies a feminist analysis to animal advocacy initiatives in which gendered and racialized representations of female sexuality are paramount. Feminists have criticized animal advocates for opposing the oppression of nonhuman animals through media images that perpetuate female objectification. These critiques are considered through a close examination of two prominent campaigns by PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals). The author argues that some representations of female sexuality may align with a posthumanist feminist ethic and need not be (...)
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  • Tolstoy's Animals.Josephine Donovan - 2009 - Society and Animals 17 (1):38-52.
    In recent years, critics sensitive to animal issues have begun to theorize a new direction in literary criticism, an animal-centric or animal-standpoint criticism. Such a criticism seeks to examine works of literature from the point of view of how animals are treated therein, often looking to reconstruct the standpoint of the animals in question. This article examines a selection of short stories by Leo Tolstoy considering them exemplary from the point of view of animal-standpoint criticism.
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  • Animals and the Discourse of Farming in Southern Africa.Les Mitchell - 2006 - Society and Animals 14 (1):39-59.
    This paper looks at discourses related to animal farming in a popular South African farming magazine. The paper analyzes four ar ticles using a form of Critical Discourse Analysis . Despite varying widely in content and style, all articles draw from the discourses of production and science; two also show a minor discourse of achievement. With further work, it is possible to discern a fourth, deeply embedded discourse: that of enslavement. This also was present in all the articles. These discourses (...)
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  • Contested Moralities: Animals and Moral Value in the Dear/Symanski Debate.William S. Lynn - 1998 - Ethics, Place and Environment 1 (2):223-242.
    Geography is experiencing a 'moral turn' in its research interests and practices. There is also a flourishing interest in animal geographies that intersects this turn, and is concurrent with wider scholarly efforts to reincorporate animals and nature” into our ethical and social theories. This article intervenes in a dispute between Michael Dear and Richard Symanski. The dispute is over the culling of wild horses in Australia, and I intervene to explore how geography deepens our moral understanding of the animallhuman dialectic. (...)
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  • The Postcolonial Animal.Philip Armstrong - 2002 - Society and Animals 10 (4):413-419.
  • Appropriating Liberation.Barry Kew - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (1):29-49.
    Media and nonhuman animal liberation is an under-researched area in the United Kingdom. If the most appropriate metaphor describing the media/social movement relationship is "dance," then largely the media and animal liberation are dancing in the dark of neglect. Drawing upon different approaches to media and offering some notes toward animal liberation media studies, this article explores how, by engaging with the "established terms of the problematic at play," animal liberationists and their claims are appropriated by speciesist ideology through exclusion (...)
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  • Death or Declaw: Dealing with Moral Ambiguity in a Veterinary Hospital.Dana Atwood-Harvey - 2005 - Society and Animals 13 (4):315-342.
    The medical practice of declawing has received much political debate over the past few years. Yet, empirical and theoretical research on how this practice is maintained and the ethical positions of those who actually participate in this work is lacking. Drawing from 9 months of ethnographic fieldwork in a feline-specific veterinary hospital and open-ended interviews with veterinarians and staff, this study examines veterinary staff members' attitudes toward, and strategies for, dealing with the medical practice of declawing. Specifically, findings show that (...)
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  • Language, Power and the Social Construction of Animals.Arran Stibbe - 2001 - Society and Animals 9 (2):145-161.
    This paper describes how language contributes to the oppression and exploitation of animals by animal product industries. Critical Discourse Analysis, a framework usually applied in countering racism and sexism, is applied to a corpus of texts taken from animal industry sources. The mass confinement and slaughter of animals in intensive farms depend on the implicit consent of the population, signaled by its willingness to buy animal products produced in this way. Ideological assumptions embedded in everyday discourse and that of the (...)
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  • An Anti-Commodification Defense of Veganism.Patrick Clipsham & Katy Fulfer - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):285-300.
    We develop an anti-commodification defense of ethical veganism which holds that common defenses of ethical veganism can benefit from treating the commodification of non-human animals as a serious, distinct moral wrong. Drawing inspiration from Elizabeth Anderson’s account of commodification, we develop an account of commodification that identifies most uses of animals in developed countries as forms of problematic commodification. We then show that this position can make significant contributions to both welfarist defenses of ethical veganism and animal rights theories.
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  • The Reintroduction and Reinterpretation of the Wild.Eileen O’Rourke - 2000 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (1-2):145-165.
    This paper is concerned with changing social representations of the “wild,” in particular wild animals. We argue that within a contemporary Western context the old agricultural perception of wild animals as adversarial and as a threat to domestication, is being replaced by an essentially urban fascination with certain emblematic wild animals, who are seen to embody symbols of naturalness and freedom. On closer examination that carefully mediatized “naturalness” may be but another form of domestication. After an historical overview of the (...)
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  • Analysing Animality: A Critical Approach.Jason Wyckoff - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (260):529-546.
    Most people seem to believe that it is wrong to cause needless suffering and death to non-human animals, and yet most people also contribute to the needless suffering and death of a great many animals. If speciesism is understood as a psychological prejudice—the tendency of an individual human agent to disregard the interests of animals—then this fact is extremely difficult to explain. I argue that once speciesism is understood structurally—as a matter of injustice rather than a matter of interpersonal wrongdoing (...)
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  • Bitches, Fishes, and Monsters: Prison Slang and Nonhuman Animal Terminology.Joshua B. Hill & Julie Banks - 2019 - Society and Animals 27 (3):254-270.
    The adult prison population in the U.S. is one of the most important, marginalized, yet misunderstood groups within the country. Not only is the population larger than those of other industrialized nations, but the prisons themselves also tend to be more punitive in nature. While there have been many proposed reasons for this, ranging from differences in the “American Character” to the increasing severity of mandatory sentencing guidelines, explanations of the American prisoner setting remain thin. One area that has relevance (...)
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  • Knocking on the Door of Human-Animal Studies: Valuing Work Across Disciplinary and Species Borderlines.Lindsay Hamilton & Laura Mitchell - 2018 - Society and Animals 26 (4):347-366.
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  • Topics Awaiting Study: Investigable Questions on Animal Issues.Paul F. Cunningham - 1995 - Society and Animals 3 (1):89-106.
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  • Moral Disengagement and Support for Nonhuman Animal Farming.Les Mitchell - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (1):38-58.
    Nonhuman animal farming, by its fundamental nature, involves a greater or lesser degree of ill treatment and oppression. Definitions of abuse or cruelty in relation to nonhumans, however, are inconsistent and ambiguous. People support nonhuman farming by purchasing its products, but the majority of people do not themselves mistreat nonhumans. How can this incongruity be explained? Any account is likely to be complex, but work in experimental psychology has identi- fied a number of conditions that can contribute toward individuals becoming (...)
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  • Animal Practices and the Racialization of Filipinas in Los Angeles.Marcie Griffith Lassiter, Jennifer Wolch & Unna - 2002 - Society and Animals 10 (3):221-248.
    Many factors contribute to the racialization of minority groups in the United States. Some individual characteristics, such as skin color or phenotype, are an obvious holdover from colonial times. Cultural differences in representational practices, customs and rituals, and belief systems are now more significant in racialization. Although not typically a focus of academic scrutiny, some of these differences involve contrasts in nature-society relations, and more specifically, nonhuman animal-society relations. In order to examine the relationship between culturally based animal practices and (...)
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  • Animal Rights, Multiculturalism, and the Left.Will Kymlicka & Sue Donaldson - 2014 - Journal of Social Philosophy 45 (1):116-135.