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Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Transparency and Obstruction

Chicago: University of Chicago Press (1988)

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  1. Narrative Reflection in the Philosophy of Teaching: Genealogies and Portraits.Hunter Mcewan - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):125-140.
    How has philosophical reflection contributed to the ways that we think about teaching? In this paper I explore two forms of narrative reflection on teaching—genealogies and portraits. Genealogies tell a story about the origins of teaching; portraits find expression in myths and other narrative forms. I explore two genealogies of teaching—one deriving from the sophist, Protagoras, in which teaching is viewed as a technical skill employing methods of instruction; the other, deriving from Plato, in which teaching is seen fundamentally in (...)
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  • Self and Sensibility: From Locke to Condillac and Rousseau.Udo Thiel - 2015 - Intellectual History Review 25 (3):257-278.
  • The Lawyer and the Lightning Rod.Jessica Riskin - 1999 - Science in Context 12 (1):61-99.
    The ArgumentIn the summer of 1783, a trial took place in the French city of Arras. One M. de Vissery, a resident of the nearby village of St. Omer, was appealing a decision by his local aldermen, who required him to remove a lightning rod he had put on his chimney. His young defense lawyer was Maximilien Robespierre, who made a name for himself by winning the case. In preparation, Robespierre and his senior colleague corresponded with natural philosophers and jurisconsultants. (...)
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  • Rousseau’s Rome and the Repudiation of Populist Republicanism.John P. McCormick - 2007 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 10 (1):3-27.
  • Rousseau's Women.Karen Green - 1996 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 4 (1):87 – 109.
    Abstract Feminists have interpreted Rousseau's attitudes to women as characteristic of a patriarchal ideology in which passion, nature and love are associated with the feminine and repressed in favour of masculine reason, culture and justice. Yet this reading does not cohere with Rousseau's adulation of nature, nor with the repression of writing and culture in favour of natural speech which Derrida finds in his texts. This paper uses Rousseau's accounts of his personal experiences to resolve this conflict and to develop (...)
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  • Claire Loves Julie: Reading the Story of Women's Friendship in La Nouvelle Héloise.Lisa Disch - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (3):19 - 45.
    Rousseau's Julie, ou La Nouvelle Héloïse is two novels in one: a story of wifely virtue and a counterstory of women's friendship. Whereas the virtue story exemplifies what feminist readers since Mary Wollstonecraft have considered to be the most oppressive of Rousseau's prescriptions for women, the friendship counterstory questions the ethical foundations and social manifestations of the model of patriarchal authority that Rousseau ordinarily defends. In this essay, I read the novel with an eye for both stories and the tension (...)
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  • Claire Loves Julie: Reading the Story of Women's Friendship in La Nouvelle Héloise.Lisa Disch - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (3):19-45.
    Rousseau's Julie, ou La Nouvelle Héloise is two novels in one: a story of wifely virtue and a counterstory of women's friendship. Whereas the virtue story exemplifies what feminist readers since Mary WoRstonecraft have considered to be the most oppressive of Rousseau's prescriptions for women, the friendship counterstory questions the ethical foundations and social manifestations of the model of patriarchal authority that Rousseau ordinarily defends. In this essay, I read the novel with an eye for both stories and the tension (...)
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  • The Pessimistic Spirit.Joshua Foa Dienstag - 1999 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (1):71-95.
    Pessimism today is poorly understood. Indeed, such is the disdain that pessimism engenders, that it often has difficulty being taken seriously as a theoretical position. Yet pessimism, which is distinct from skepticism and nihilism, has much to offer those who have discarded the Enlightenment's expectation of progress. Through an examination of Rousseau, Schopenhauer and Unamuno, this paper traces out some of the common themes of pessimistic thought. Pessimism, it is argued, is con-cerned with the burden of time and with the (...)
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  • Kant on Anthropology and Alienology: The Opacity of Human Motivation and its Anthropological Implications.Alix Cohen - 2008 - Kantian Review 13 (2):85-106.
    According to Kant, the opacity of human motivation takes two distinct forms – a psychological form: man ‘can never, even by the most strenuous self-examination, get entirely behind [his] covert incentives’ – and a social form: ‘everyone in our race finds it advisable to be on his guard, and not to reveal himself completely’. In other words, first, men's ‘interior’ cannot be entirely revealed to themselves and, second, they tend not to reveal their ‘interior’ to others. A number of Kant (...)
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  • Democracy and the Spectacle: On Rousseau’s Homeopathic Strategy.Chiara Bottici - 2015 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 41 (3):235-248.
    Rousseau maintains that the spectacle isolates us at the very same moment when it brings us together. This article argues that this striking remark must be understood within the more general framework of a critique of the spectacular nature of modern society. But if the spectacle is not simply an occasional form of entertainment, but a social relationship that pervades modern society as a whole, how can we escape from it? Rousseau’s homeopathic strategy, according to which we should fight an (...)
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  • Authenticity and the Limits of Philosophy.Lauren Bialystok - 2014 - Dialogue 53 (2):271-298.
    À peu près tout le monde a déjà fait l’expérience intuitive de l’authenticité, d’un moment qui semble révéler une lueur de sa véritable identité. Pourtant, en posant l’existence d’un «vrai moi», l’idée d’authenticité pose des défis métaphysiques qui mettent en lumière les complexités de l’individualité. J’avance que pour être bien examinée, l’authenticité exige une structure essentialiste qui tend à s’appliquer à l’identité personnelle. J’examine ensuite les trois types d’approches les plus influents dans les discussions philosophiques modernes contre cette position : (...)
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  • "Rousseau, Amour-Propre, and Intellectual Celebrity".Michael McLendon - 2009 - Journal of Politics 71 (2):506-19.
    With the publication of the First Discourse, Rousseau initiated a famous debate over the social value of the arts and sciences. As this debate developed, however, it transformed into a question of the value of the intellectuals as a social class and touched upon questions of identity formation. While the philosophes were lobbying to become a new cultural aristocracy, Rousseau believed the ideological glorification of intellectual talent demeaned the peasants and working classes. This essay argues that amour propre, as put (...)
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