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  1. On the Claims of Unjust Institutions: Reciprocity, Justice and Noncompliance.Gabriel Wollner - 2018 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 18 (1):46-75.
    Just institutions have claims on us. There are two reasons for thinking that such claims are warranted. First, one may believe that we are under a natural duty of justice to support and further just institutions. If one believes that it matters whether institutions are just, one also has a reason, almost as a matter of consistency, to support and further just institutions. Second, one may believe that by enjoying the benefits brought about by cooperation through just institutions, one incurs (...)
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  • Self-Defense, Forfeiture, and Necessity.David Alm - forthcoming - Philosophical Papers:1-24.
    The thesis of this paper is that it is possible to explain why a culpable aggressor forfeits his right not to suffer the harm necessary to prevent his aggression if a killer forfeits his right to life. I argue that this strategy accounts also for the necessity restriction on self-defense. I respond to several objections, including the worry that it makes no sense to attempt a derivation of the relatively uncontroversial from the highly controversial.
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  • Self-Defence, Just War, and a Reasonable Prospect of Success.Suzanne Uniacke - 2014 - In Helen Frowe & Gerald Lang (eds.), How We Fight. Oxford University Press. pp. 62-74.
    The Just War principle of jus ad bellum explicitly requires a reasonable prospect of success; the prevailing view about personal self-defence is that it can be justified even if the prospect of success is low. This chapter defends the existence of this distinction and goes on to explore the normative basis of this difference between defensive war and self-defence and its implications. In particular, the chapter highlights the rationale of the ‘success condition’ within Just War thinking and argues that this (...)
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  • Success and the Aftermath of Surrender.Yuchun Kuo - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (1):101-113.
    This paper first argues that a state can justifiably fight a hopeless war of self-defense when its enemy determines to massacre its people after it surrenders or is defeated. The main reason is that, in this situation, even if the victim state surrenders, it still has to suffer from harms that are similar to or worse than the harms involved in fighting a hopeless war. This paper then discusses some complicated issues raised by applying this argument to various situations in (...)
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  • The Ethics of War. Part II: Contemporary Authors and Issues.Endre Begby, Gregory M. Reichberg & Henrik Syse - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (5):328-347.