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  1. If You Can’T Sell Your Kidney, Can You Trade It? Examining the Morality of Alternative Kidney Exchange Institutions.Stephen Schmidt - manuscript
    In the absence of kidney markets, alternative institutions for exchanging kidneys have arisen to give donors incentives to donate. I examine thirteen such institutions, and ask whether moral arguments against markets, such as commodification, apply to them or not. I find that most arguments against kidney arguments also argue against these alternative institutions, meaning those arguments are not strong enough to prevent society from using institutions to exchange kidneys. Two arguments that do explain which kidney exchange institutions are socially accepted (...)
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  • An Organ Sale by Any Other Name.Jerry Menikoff - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):42 – 44.
  • New Models for Increasing Donor Awareness: The Role of Religion.Alan Jotkowitz - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):41 – 42.
  • Prudential Motives and Reciprocal Altruism.Adrian M. Viens - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):44 – 46.
  • “Opting-In” and Unnecessary Penalties for Non Kidney Donors.Justin M. List - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):39 – 41.
  • Framing the Organ System: Altruism or Cooperation?Christopher Robertson - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):46 – 48.
  • Reasonable People, Double Jeopardy, and Justice.Sara Goering & Annette Dula - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):37 – 39.
  • Conscientious Objection to an Opt-in System.Chris Hackler - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):25 – 26.
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  • In Defense of Live Kidney Donation.Joseph P. DeMarco - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):33 – 35.
  • Shifting to Other Justice Issues: Examining Listing Practices.Denise M. Dudzinski - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):35 – 37.
  • Haunted by the "God Committee": Reciprocity Does No Justice to Eliminating Social Disparities.Elisa J. Gordon - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):23 – 25.
  • Utility, Fairness, and What Really Matters in Organ Provision.James Lindemann Nelson - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):27 – 29.
  • Discriminating Against "Organ Takers".Fritz Allhoff - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):31 – 33.
    This article responds to David Steinberg's proposal in favor of an organ donation system that gives allocation preference to people who agree to donate after they die. This article challenges the notion that organ taking is morally impermissible and questions Steinberg’s program on the grounds that it would unfairly discriminate against these people by deprioritizing their claims to the kidney supply. Relatedly, the article suggests that Steinberg’s proposal effectively coerces people to opt in, thus calling into question the legitimacy of (...)
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  • Why We Must Leave Our Organs to Others.D. Micah Hester - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):W23-W28.
    Organ procurement presents several ethical concerns (from what constitutes acceptable criteria for death to issues involved in specifically designating to whom an organ can be given), but none is more central than the concern for what are appropriate means for acquiring organs. The following discussion attempts a different perspective on the issue of organ procurement by arguing that, rather than appealing to our charitable consciences or our pocketbooks, relinquishing our organs after death in this day and age is, in fact, (...)
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  • Mandatory Autopsies and Organ Conscription.David Hershenov - 2009 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (4):367-391.
    The State may require an autopsy when foul play is suspected in the death of one of its citizens.[1] This is so regardless of any objections to such invasive procedures expressed by the deceased before their deaths or afterward by their families. There is not even a religious exemption. The most obvious explanation for why consent is not needed is that apprehending a murderer with information obtained from the autopsy can save lives. However, taking organs without consent from the deceased (...)
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  • Priority to Registered Donors on the Waiting List for Postmortal Organs? A Critical Look at the Objections.Govert den Hartogh - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):149-152.
    It has often been proposed to restrict access to postmortal organs to registered donors, or at least to give them priority on the waiting list. Such proposals are motivated by considerations of fairness: everyone benefits from the existence of a pool of available organs and of an organised system of distributing them and it is unfair that people who are prepared to contribute to this public good are duped by people who are not. This paper spells out this rationale and (...)
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  • Is Consent of the Donor Enough to Justify the Removal of Living Organs?Govert den Hartogh - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):45-54.
  • Between Solidarity and Self-Interest: How Fair is the "Club Model" for Organ Donation?Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):19 – 20.
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  • Forced Altruism is Not Altruism.Sheldon Zink & Stacey L. Wertlieb - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):29 – 31.
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  • An "Opting in" Paradigm for Organ Procurement for Kidney Transplantation? A Community Based Participatory Approach is a Different View, and a Softer Approach.Stephen O. Sodeke - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):48 – 50.
  • Lifesharers: An "Opting in" Paradigm Already in Operation.Steve P. Calandrillo, Lloyd R. Cohen & David J. Undis - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):17 – 18.
  • Do Gifts Create Moral Obligations for Recipients?Mary Simmerling, Peter Angelos, Aviva Goldberg & Joel Frader - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):20 – 22.
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  • Morality, Justice and Opting In.Elysa R. Koppelman-White - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):26 – 27.
  • Bonus Allocation Points for Those Willing to Donate Organs.Robert M. Veatch - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):1 – 3.
  • Opting for Equity.Mark D. Fox, Margaret R. Allee & Gloria J. Taylor - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):15 – 16.
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  • Solidarity: An Important Aspect of the "Opting in" Paradigm.Liva Jacoby - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):16 – 17.
  • Refining an “Opt in” Approach.Mark S. Nadel - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):51-52.
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  • Recent Developments in Health Law.Ellen Moskowitz - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (1):168-187.
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  • Recent Developments in Health Law.Ellen Moskowitz - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (1):168-187.
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