Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Turing, Matthews and Millikan: Effective Memory, Dispositionalism and Pushmepullyou Mental States.Eli Dresner - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (4):461-472.
    Abstract In the first section of the paper I present Alan Turing?s notion of effective memory, as it appears in his 1936 paper ?On Computable Numbers, With an Application to The Entscheidungsproblem?. This notion stands in surprising contrast with the way memory is usually thought of in the context of contemporary computer science. Turing?s view (in 1936) is that for a computing machine to remember a previously scanned string of symbols is not to store an internal symbolic image of this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Alan Turing and the Mathematical Objection.Gualtiero Piccinini - 2003 - Minds and Machines 13 (1):23-48.
    This paper concerns Alan Turing’s ideas about machines, mathematical methods of proof, and intelligence. By the late 1930s, Kurt Gödel and other logicians, including Turing himself, had shown that no finite set of rules could be used to generate all true mathematical statements. Yet according to Turing, there was no upper bound to the number of mathematical truths provable by intelligent human beings, for they could invent new rules and methods of proof. So, the output of a human mathematician, for (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • On Alan Turing's Anticipation of Connectionism.Diane Proudfoot & Jack Copeland - 1996 - Synthese 108:361-367.
    It is not widely realised that Turing was probably the first person to consider building computing machines out of simple, neuron-like elements connected together into networks in a largely random manner. Turing called his networks 'unorganised machines'. By the application of what he described as 'appropriate interference, mimicking education' an unorganised machine can be trained to perform any task that a Turing machine can carry out, provided the number of 'neurons' is sufficient. Turing proposed simulating both the behaviour of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • The Physical Church-Turing Thesis: Modest or Bold?Gualtiero Piccinini - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (4):733-769.
    This article defends a modest version of the Physical Church-Turing thesis (CT). Following an established recent trend, I distinguish between what I call Mathematical CT—the thesis supported by the original arguments for CT—and Physical CT. I then distinguish between bold formulations of Physical CT, according to which any physical process—anything doable by a physical system—is computable by a Turing machine, and modest formulations, according to which any function that is computable by a physical system is computable by a Turing machine. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • A Natural Axiomatization of Computability and Proof of Church's Thesis.Nachum Dershowitz & Yuri Gurevich - 2008 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 14 (3):299-350.
    Church's Thesis asserts that the only numeric functions that can be calculated by effective means are the recursive ones, which are the same, extensionally, as the Turing-computable numeric functions. The Abstract State Machine Theorem states that every classical algorithm is behaviorally equivalent to an abstract state machine. This theorem presupposes three natural postulates about algorithmic computation. Here, we show that augmenting those postulates with an additional requirement regarding basic operations gives a natural axiomatization of computability and a proof of Church's (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • The Mathematical Work of S. C. Kleene.J. R. Shoenfield & S. C. Kleene - 1995 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 1 (1):8-43.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Broad Conception of Computation.Jack Copeland - 1997 - American Behavioral Scientist 40 (6):690-716.
    A myth has arisen concerning Turing's paper of 1936, namely that Turing set forth a fundamental principle concerning the limits of what can be computed by machine - a myth that has passed into cognitive science and the philosophy of mind, to wide and pernicious effect. This supposed principle, sometimes incorrectly termed the 'Church-Turing thesis', is the claim that the class of functions that can be computed by machines is identical to the class of functions that can be computed by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Kalmár's Argument Against the Plausibility of Church's Thesis.Máté Szabó - 2018 - History and Philosophy of Logic 39 (2):140-157.
    In his famous paper, An Unsolvable Problem of Elementary Number Theory, Alonzo Church identified the intuitive notion of effective calculability with the mathematically precise notion of recursiveness. This proposal, known as Church's Thesis, has been widely accepted. Only a few papers have been written against it. One of these is László Kalmár's An Argument Against the Plausibility of Church's Thesis from 1959. The aim of this paper is to present Kalmár's argument and to fill in missing details based on his (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Alan Turing's Anticipation of Connectionism.Jack Copeland - 1996 - Synthese 108 (3):361-377.
    It is not widely realised that Turing was probably the first person to consider building computing machines out of simple, neuron-like elements connected together into networks in a largely random manner. Turing called his networks unorganised machines. By the application of what he described as appropriate interference, mimicking education an unorganised machine can be trained to perform any task that a Turing machine can carry out, provided the number of neurons is sufficient. Turing proposed simulating both the behaviour of the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Computability and Recursion.Robert I. Soare - 1996 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 2 (3):284-321.
    We consider the informal concept of "computability" or "effective calculability" and two of the formalisms commonly used to define it, "(Turing) computability" and "(general) recursiveness". We consider their origin, exact technical definition, concepts, history, general English meanings, how they became fixed in their present roles, how they were first and are now used, their impact on nonspecialists, how their use will affect the future content of the subject of computability theory, and its connection to other related areas. After a careful (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  • Juegos con dados, cómputos numéricos: cómo puede ser calculado un conjunto numérico aleatorio.Enrique Alonso González - 1998 - Endoxa 1 (10):27.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Diagonalisation and Church's Thesis: Kleene's Homework.Enrique Alonso & Maria Manzano - 2005 - History and Philosophy of Logic 26 (2):93-113.
    In this paper we will discuss the active part played by certain diagonal arguments in the genesis of computability theory. 1?In some cases it is enough to assume the enumerability of Y while in others the effective enumerability is a substantial demand. These enigmatical words by Kleene were our point of departure: When Church proposed this thesis, I sat down to disprove it by diagonalizing out of the class of the ??definable functions. But, quickly realizing that the diagonalization cannot be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation