Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Are There Dead Persons?Patrick Stokes - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (6):755-775.
    Schechtman’s ‘Person Life View’ offers an account of personal identity whereby persons are the unified loci of our practical and ethical judgment. PLV also recognises infants and permanent vegetative state patients as being persons. I argue that the way PLV handles these cases yields an unexpected result: the dead also remain persons, contrary to the widely-accepted ‘Termination Thesis.’ Even more surprisingly, this actually counts in PLV’s favor: in light of our social and ethical practices which treat the dead as moral (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Identifying Virtues and Values Through Obituary Data-Mining.Mark Alfano, Andrew Higgins & Jacob Levernier - 2018 - Journal of Value Inquiry 52 (1).
    Because obituaries are succinct and explicitly intended to summarize their subjects’ lives, they may be expected to include only the features that the author finds most salient but also to signal to others in the community the socially-recognized aspects of the deceased’s character. We begin by reviewing studies 1 and 2, in which obituaries were carefully read and labeled. We then report study 3, which further develops these results with a semi-automated, large-scale semantic analysis of several thousand obituaries. Geography, gender, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Life-Extending Enhancements and the Narrative Approach to Personal Identity.Andrea Sauchelli - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (4):219-225.
    Various debates on the desirability and rationality of life-extending enhancements have been pursued under the presupposition that a generic psychological theory of personal identity is correct. I here discuss how the narrative approach to personal identity can contribute to these debates. In particular, I argue that two versions of the narrative approach offer good reasons to reject an argument against the rationality of life-extending enhancements.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Bootstrapping the Afterlife.Roman Altshuler - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (2).
    Samuel Scheffler defends “The Afterlife Conjecture”: the view that the continued existence of humanity after our deaths—“the afterlife”—lies in the background of our valuing; were we to lose confidence in it, many of the projects we engage in would lose their meaning. The Afterlife Conjecture, in his view, also brings out the limits of our egoism, showing that we care more about yet unborn strangers than about personal survival. But why does the afterlife itself matter to us? Examination of Scheffler’s (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ctrl+Alt+Delete : The Changing Landscape of the Uncanny Valley and the Fear of Second Loss.Debra J. Bassett - forthcoming - Current Psychology.
    We are living in a digital era where ubiquitous social media are becoming part of the everyday lives of many. These social media platforms were designed for the living; however an estimated 8000 Facebook members die daily. It is therefore no surprise that the phenomena of how social media platforms are adopted to discuss death dying and grieving have become a growing area of research across numerous disciplines. Using qualitative methods, this article adds to and moves beyond existing research by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Political Economy of Death in the Age of Information: A Critical Approach to the Digital Afterlife Industry.Carl Öhman & Luciano Floridi - 2017 - Minds and Machines 27 (4):639-662.
    Online technologies enable vast amounts of data to outlive their producers online, thereby giving rise to a new, digital form of afterlife presence. Although researchers have begun investigating the nature of such presence, academic literature has until now failed to acknowledge the role of commercial interests in shaping it. The goal of this paper is to analyse what those interests are and what ethical consequences they may have. This goal is pursued in three steps. First, we introduce the concept of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations