Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Objectivity of Faith: Kierkegaard's Critique of Fideism.Eleanor Helms - 2013 - Res Philosophica 90 (4):439-460.
    Perhaps Kierkegaard’s most notorious—though pseudonymous—claim is that truth is subjectivity. This claim is commonly elaborated to mean that faith is a “how” and not a “what” . I show through a discussion of examples taken from throughout Kierkegaard’s writings that Kierkegaard accepts a basic insight of Kant’s philosophy: each experience implicitly includes an underlying unity—the object—that does not itself appear. Both Kant and Kierkegaard emphasize the importance of a “continuity of impressions,” which gives experience its unified structure beyond changing superficial (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Contemporaneity and Communion: Kierkegaard on the Personal Presence of Christ.Joshua Cockayne - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (1):41-62.
    Søren Kierkegaard’s claim that having faith requires being contemporary with Christ is one of the most important, yet difficult to interpret claims across his entire authorship. How can one be contemporary with a figure who existed more than two millennia ago? A prominent answer to this question is that contemporaneity with Christ is achieved through a kind of imaginative co-presence made possible by reading Scripture. However, I argue, this ignores what Kierkegaard thinks about Christ as a living agent, and not (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Locke, Kierkegaard and the Phenomenology of Personal Identity.Patrick Stokes - 2008 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (5):645 – 672.
    Personal Identity theorists as diverse as Derek Parfit, Marya Schechtman and Galen Strawson have noted that the experiencing subject (the locus of present psychological experience) and the person (a human being with a career/narrative extended across time) are not necessarily coextensive. Accordingly, we can become psychologically alienated from, and fail to experience a sense of identity with, the person we once were or will be. This presents serious problems for Locke's original account of “sameness of consciousness” constituting personal identity, given (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Uniting the Perspectival Subject: Two Approaches.Patrick Stokes - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):23-44.
    Visual forms of episodic memory and anticipatory imagination involve images that, by virtue of their perspectival organization, imply a notional subject of experience. But they contain no inbuilt reference to the actual subject, the person actually doing the remembering or imagining. This poses the problem of what (if anything) connects these two perspectival subjects and what differentiates cases of genuine memory and anticipation from mere imagined seeing. I consider two approaches to this problem. The first, exemplified by Wollheim and Velleman, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Moment of Self-Transformation: Kierkegaard on Suffering and the Subject.Samuel Cuff Snow - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (2):161-180.
    In his self-published periodical The Moment, Søren Kierkegaard warns his reader against the possibility of “useless suffering”. Not only that, he urges the reader to make use of her suffering. Taking this caution as a point of departure, I investigate the pseudonymous Johannes Climacus’ deliberations on ethico-religious suffering in the Postscript. I demonstrate that Climacus construes suffering as useful, and with that outlines an economy of suffering that Kierkegaard delineates across his pseudonymous and non-pseudonymous work. The paradigmatic expression of this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Imitation and Contemporaneity: Kierkegaard and the Imitation of Christ.Joshua Cockayne - 2017 - Heythrop Journal.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark