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  1. Physicians and the Problem of Other Consciousnesses.Philip R. Sullivan - 1996 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (1):115-123.
  • On the Relationship Between Cognitive Models and Spiritual Maps. Evidence From Hebrew Language Mysticism.Brian L. Lancaster - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):11-12.
    It is suggested that the impetus to generate models is probably the most fundamental point of connection between mysticism and psychology. In their concern with the relation between ‘unseen’ realms and the ‘seen’, mystical maps parallel cognitive models of the relation between ‘unconscious’ and ‘conscious’ processes. The map or model constitutes an explanation employing terms current within the respective canon. The case of language mysticism is examined to illustrate the premise that cognitive models may benefit from an understanding of the (...)
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  • Are Current Philosophical Theories of Consciousness Useful to Neuroscientists?Philip R. Sullivan - 2006 - Behavior and Philosophy 34:59-70.
    Two radically different families of theory currently compete for acceptance among theorists of human consciousness. The majority of theorists believe that the human brain somehow causes consciousness, but a significant minority holds that how the brain would cause this property is not only currently incomprehensible, but unlikely to become comprehensible despite continuing advances in brain science. Some of these latter theorists hold an alternate view that consciousness may well be one of the fundamentals in nature, and that the extremely complex (...)
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  • Limitations on the Neuroscientific Study of Mystical Experiences.Richard H. Jones - 2018 - Zygon 53 (4):992-1017.
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  • The Mystical Stance: The Experience of Self‐Loss and Daniel Dennett's “Center of Narrative Gravity”.William Simpson - 2014 - Zygon 49 (2):458-475.
    For centuries, mystically inclined practitioners from various religious traditions have articulated anomalous and mystical experiences. One common aspect of these experiences is the feeling of the loss of the sense of self, referred to as “self-loss.” The occurrence of “self-loss” can be understood as the feeling of losing the subject/object distinction in one's phenomenal experience. In this article, the author attempts to incorporate these anomalous experiences into modern understandings of the mind and “self” from philosophy and psychology. Accounts of self-loss (...)
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