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  1. Beyond “Monologicality”? Exploring Conspiracist Worldviews.Bradley Franks, Adrian Bangerter, Martin W. Bauer, Matthew Hall & Mark C. Noort - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Expertise and Conspiracy Theories.M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (3):196-208.
    Judging the warrant of conspiracy theories can be difficult, and often we rely upon what the experts tell us when it comes to assessing whether particular conspiracy theories ought to be believed. However, whereas there are recognised experts in the sciences, I argue that only are is no such associated expertise when it comes to the things we call `conspiracy theories,' but that the conspiracy theorist has good reason to be suspicious of the role of expert endorsements when it comes (...)
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  • Does "Think" Mean the Same Thing as "Believe"? Insights Into Religious Cognition.Larisa Heiphetz, Casey Landers & Neil Van Leeuwen - forthcoming - Psychology of Religion and Spirituality.
    When someone says she believes that God exists, is she expressing the same kind of mental state as when she says she thinks that a lake bigger than Lake Michigan exists⎯i.e., does she refer to the same kind of cognitive attitude in both cases? Using evidence from linguistic corpora (Study 1) and behavioral experiments (Studies 2-4), the current work provides evidence that individuals typically use the word “believe” more in conjunction with statements about religious credences and “think” more in conjunction (...)
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  • Topic Modeling Reveals Distinct Interests Within an Online Conspiracy Forum.Colin Klein, Peter Clutton & Vince Polito - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Conspiracy theories play a troubling role in political discourse. Online forums provide a valuable window into everyday conspiracy theorizing, and can give a clue to the motivations and interests of those who post in such forums. Yet this online activity can be difficult to quantify and study. We describe a unique approach to studying online conspiracy theorists which used non-negative matrix factorization to create a topic model of authors' contributions to the main conspiracy forum on Reddit. This subreddit provides a (...)
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  • Bridging the Great Divide: Conspiracy Theory Research for the 21st Century.Michael Butter & Peter Knight - 2016 - Diogenes:039219211666928.
    This article starts from the observation that research on conspiracy theories is currently thriving, but that it is also fragmented. In particular there is an increasing divide between disciplines...
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  • Online Communication as a Window to Conspiracist Worldviews.Michael J. Wood & Karen M. Douglas - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Psychological Research on Conspiracy Beliefs: Field Characteristics, Measurement Instruments, and Associations With Personality Traits.Andreas Goreis & Martin Voracek - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Reducing Pseudoscientific and Paranormal Beliefs in University Students Through a Course in Science and Critical Thinking.James A. Wilson - 2018 - Science & Education 27 (1-2):183-210.
    This study measured the relationship between student’s religion, gender, and propensity for fantasy thinking with the change in belief for paranormal and pseudoscientific subjects following a science and critical thinking course that directly confronted these subjects. Student pre-course endorsement of religious, paranormal, and pseudoscientific beliefs ranged from 21 to 53%, with religion having the highest endorsement rate. Pre-course belief in paranormal and pseudoscientific subjects was correlated with high scores in some fantasy thinking scales and showed a gender and a religion (...)
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  • Individual Difference in Acts of Self-Sacrifice.Michael N. Stagnaro, Rebecca Littman & David G. Rand - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  • Someone is Pulling the Strings: Hypersensitive Agency Detection and Belief in Conspiracy Theories.Karen M. Douglas, Robbie M. Sutton, Mitchell J. Callan, Rael J. Dawtry & Annelie J. Harvey - 2016 - Thinking and Reasoning 22 (1):57-77.
    We hypothesised that belief in conspiracy theories would be predicted by the general tendency to attribute agency and intentionality where it is unlikely to exist. We further hypothesised that this tendency would explain the relationship between education level and belief in conspiracy theories, where lower levels of education have been found to be associated with higher conspiracy belief. In Study 1 participants were more likely to agree with a range of conspiracy theories if they also tended to attribute intentionality and (...)
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  • The Evolution of Analytic Thought?Gordon Pennycook & David G. Rand - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  • Disbelief in Belief: On the Cognitive Status of Supernatural Beliefs.Maarten Boudry & Jerry Coyne - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (4):601-615.
    Religious people seem to believe things that range from the somewhat peculiar to the utterly bizarre. Or do they? According to a new paper by Neil Van Leeuwen, religious “credence” is nothing like mundane factual belief. It has, he claims, more in common with fictional imaginings. Religious folk do not really “believe”—in the ordinary sense of the word—what they profess to believe. Like fictional imaginings, but unlike factual beliefs, religious credences are activated only within specific settings. We argue that Van (...)
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