Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Mediating Role of Anticipated Guilt in Consumers' Ethical Decision-Making.Sarah Steenhaut & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (3):269 - 288.
    In this paper, we theorize that the anticipation of guilt plays an important role in ethically questionable consumer situations. We propose an ethical decision-making framework incorporating anticipated guilt as partial mediator between consumers' ethical beliefs (anteceded by ethical ideology) and intentions. In the first study, we compared several models using structural equation modeling and found empirical support for our research model. A second experiment was set up to illustrate how these new insights may be applied to prevent consumers from taking (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • An Empirical Investigation of the Relationships Among a Consumer’s Personal Values, Ethical Ideology and Ethical Beliefs.Sarah Steenhaut & Patrick van Kenhove - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):137 - 155.
    This study provides an additional partial test of the Hunt-Vitell theory [1986, Journal of Macro-marketing, 8, 5-16; 1993, 'The General Theory of Marketing Ethics: A Retrospective and Revision', in N. C. Smith and J. A. Quelch (eds.), Ethics in Marketing (Irwin Inc., Homewood), pp. 775-784], within the consumer ethics context. Using structural equation modeling, the relationships among an individual's personal values (conceptualized by the typology of Schwartz [1992, 'Universals in the Content and Structure of Values: Theoretical Advances and Empirical Tests (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Consumer Ethics: The Role of Self-Regulatory Focus.Tine De Bock & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):241 - 255.
    The present study investigates the influence of self-regulatory focus on consumer ethical beliefs (i.e., consumers' judgment of various unethical consumer practices). The self-regulatory focus framework is highly influential and applies to an impressively wide spectrum of topics across a diverse array of domains. However, previous research has not yet examined the link between this personality construct and the consumer ethics field. Findings indicate that promotion affects one's attitude toward questionable consumer practices with those having a stronger (versus weaker) promotion focus (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Double Standards: The Role of Techniques of Neutralization.Tine De Bock & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):283 - 296.
    Despite the growing number of studies examining consumers' perceptions of unethical corporate and consumer practices, research examining the apparent double standard existing between what consumers perceive as acceptable corporate behaviour and what they believe are acceptable consumer practices remains scarce. Contradictory, double standards are often quoted by other researchers as a major stream in ethical literature.The few studies dealing with this topic as well as this study indicate that people rate corporate unethical actions as less admissible compared to similar consumer (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Attitudes Towards Information Ethics: A View From Egypt.Omar E. M. Khalil & Ahmed A. S. Seleim - 2012 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 10 (4):240-261.
  • The Impacts of Ethical Ideology, Materialism, and Selected Demographics on Consumer Ethics: An Empirical Study in China.Chun-Chen Huang, Long-Chuan Lu, Ching-Sing You & Szu-Wei Yen - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (4):315 - 331.
    This study attempts to investigate the relationships among the ethical beliefs of Chinese consumers and orientations based on attitudinal attributes: materialism and moral philosophies (idealism and relativism). In addition, this study examines Chinese consumers' ethical beliefs in relation to five selected demographic characteristics (gender, age, religion, family income and education). Based on this exploratory study of 284 Chinese consumers, the following statistically significant findings were discovered. First, Chinese consumers regard that a passively benefiting activity is more ethical, but actively benefiting (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Researcher Interaction Biases and Business Ethics Research: Respondent Reactions to Researcher Characteristics.Anthony D. Miyazaki & Kimberly A. Taylor - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):779-795.
    The potential for biased responses that occur when researchers interact with their study participants has long been of interest to both academicians and practitioners. Given the sensitive nature of the field, researcher interaction biases are of particular concern for business ethics researchers regardless of their preference for survey, experimental, or qualitative methodology. Whereas some ethics researchers may inadvertently bias data by misrecording or misinterpreting responses, other biases may occur when study participants' responses are systematically influenced by the mere introduction of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Business Unethicality as an Impediment to Consumer Trust: The Moderating Role of Demographic and Cultural Characteristics. [REVIEW]Leonidas C. Leonidou, Olga Kvasova, Constantinos N. Leonidou & Simos Chari - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):397-415.
    The article reports the findings of a study conducted among 387 consumers regarding their perceptions of the unethicality of business practices of firms and how these affect their response behavior, in terms of trust, satisfaction, and loyalty. The study confirmed that high levels of perceived corporate unethicality decrease consumer trust. This in turn reduces consumer satisfaction, which ultimately has negative effects on customer loyalty. It was also revealed that, although both consumer gender and urbanity have a moderating effect on the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Investigating Moral Ideology, Ethical Beliefs, and Moral Intensity Among Consumers of Pakistan.Syed Afzal Moshadi Shah & Shehla Amjad - 2017 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 6 (2):153-187.
    The purpose of the study is to empirically examine moral ideology, ethical beliefs, and moral intensity in the context of Pakistan. Jones, 366–395, 1991) model and Muncy and Vitell have extensively been investigated and validated in west for examining ethical decision-making process. This study examines and validates these models in a collectivist cultural settings, i.e., Pakistan. A self-administered online survey technique using convenience sampling technique was used to gather data from a sample of 1000 consumers in Pakistan. Final analysis was (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Consumer Ethics: A Cross-Cultural Study of the Ethical Beliefs of Turkish and American Consumers.Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas, Ziad Swaidan & Mine Oyman - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):183-195.
    The ethical climate in Turkey is beset by ethical problems. Bribery, environmental pollution, tax frauds, deceptive advertising, production of unsafe products, and the ethical violations that involved politicians and business professionals are just a few examples. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the ethical beliefs of American and Turkish consumers using the Ethical Position Questionnaire (EPQ) of Forsyth (1980), the Machiavellianism scale, and the Consumer Ethical Practices of Muncy and Vitell questionnaire (MVQ). A sample of 376 (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  • Moral Philosophy, Materialism, and Consumer Ethics: An Exploratory Study in Indonesia. [REVIEW]Long-Chuan Lu & Chia-Ju Lu - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):193 - 210.
    Although the ethical judgment of consumers in the United States and other industrialized countries has received considerable attention, consumer ethics in Asian-market settings have seldom been explored. The purchase and making of counterfeit products are considered common, but disreputable, attributes of Southeast Asian consumers. According to the Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN), Indonesia ranks third among the leading countries of counterfeit items in Asia. Retail revenue losses attributed to counterfeiting amounted to US $183 million in 2004. Therefore, elucidating the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Consumer Ethics: The Role of Acculturation in U.S. Immigrant Populations.Ziad Swaidan, Scott J. Vitell, Gregory M. Rose & Faye W. Gilbert - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):1-16.
    This study examines the role of acculturation in shaping consumers’ views of ethics. Specifically, it examines the relationships between the desire to keep one’s original culture, the desire to adopt the host culture, and the four dimensions of the Muncy and Vitell (Journal of Business Research Ethics 24(4), 297, 1992) consumer ethics scale. Using two separate immigrant populations – one of former Middle-Eastern residents now living in the U.S. and the other of Asian immigrants in the U.S. – results indicate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Do Cultural and Generational Cohorts Matter to Ideologies and Consumer Ethics? A Comparative Study of Australians, Indonesians, and Indonesian Migrants in Australia.Andre A. Pekerti & Denni Arli - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (2):387-404.
    We explore the notion that culture influences people’s values, and their subsequent ideologies and ethical behaviors. We present the idea that culture itself changes with time, and explore the influence of culture and generational markers on consumer ethics by examining differences in these ethical dimensions between Australians, Indonesians, and Indonesian Migrants in Australia, as well as differences between Generation X versus Generations Y and Z. The present study addresses the need to investigate the role that culture plays in consumer ethics, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ethical Judgments in Business Ethics Research: Definition, and Research Agenda.John R. Sparks & Yue Pan - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (3):405-418.
    Decades of empirical and theoretical research has produced an extensive literature on the ethical judgments construct. Given its importance to understanding people’s ethical choices, future research should explore the psychological processes that produce ethical judgments. In this paper, the authors discuss two steps needed to advance this effort. First, they note that the business ethics literature lacks a single, generally accepted definition of ethical judgments. After reviewing several extant definitions, the authors offer a definition of the construct and discuss its (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Examining the Roles of Collectivism, Attitude Toward Business, and Religious Beliefs on Consumer Ethics in China.Chun-Chen Huang & Long-Chuan Lu - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):505-514.
    Chinese consumers comprise a unique subculture that exerts a considerable influence on the market and are treated as a collective group by researchers. However, few studies have examined the effects of collectivism and consumer attitudinal attributes on consumer ethics. Although the practice of religion was prohibited in China before economic reforms in the late 1970s, religion remains a major factor that affects the ethical judgment of consumers. The present study, based on the Hunt–Vitell model, examines the influence of culture and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Does Consumer Unethical Behavior Relate to Birthplace? Evidence From China.BaoChun Zhao & ShanShan Xu - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):475-488.
    This study explores the relationship between individual birthplace [rural birthplace (RB) and urban birthplace (UB)] and consumer unethical behavior (CUB). As a result, CUB is verified to closely relate to individual birthplace, and those new urban residents with RB are found to behave more ethically than the patrimonial urban residents with UB in CUB4 (“no harm/no foul”). This study also finds that the differentiation of CUB between two categories of consumers is correlated with the personal moral ideology or Machiavellianism (MA) (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Impact of Social Darwinism Perception, Status Anxiety, Perceived Trust of People, and Cultural Orientation on Consumer Ethical Beliefs.Jyh-Shen Chiou & Lee-Yun Pan - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (4):487-502.
    This study intends to explore the effects of political, social and cultural values on consumers’ ethical beliefs regarding questionable consumption behaviors. The variables examined include status anxiety, social Darwinism perception, perceived trust of people, and cultural orientation. Based on a field survey in Taiwan, the results showed that consumers with low ethical beliefs have higher perception of social Darwinism and status anxiety than consumers possess neutral and high ethical beliefs. The result also showed that the neutral ethics group had higher (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Culture and Consumer Ethics.Ziad Swaidan - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):201-213.
    Disparity in consumer ethics reflects cultural variations; these are differences in the collective programming of the mind that distinguishes one culture from another. This study explores the differences in consumer ethics across cultural dimensions using Hofstede's (in Culture's consequences: international differences in work-related values, Sage, Beverly Hills, 1980) model (collectivism, masculinity, power distance, and uncertainty avoidance) and Muncy and Vitell (in J Bus Res 24(4): 297-311, 1992) consumer ethics model (i.e., illegal, active, passive, and no harm). This is the first (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations