Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Symbols, Meaning, and Origins of Mind.Abhinav Gautam & Subhash Kak - 2013 - Biosemiotics 6 (3):301-310.
    The mind maps symbols and the extra-symbolic relationships amongst them to specific meanings. When symbols of various levels are placed in a hierarchical ordering, one may look at such ordered classes as distinct worlds where one class represents objects and the other represents the objects’ corresponding meanings. However, such an explanation can only be partial because the number of potential levels in such an ordering is infinite and, therefore, it engenders problems of recursion and infinite regress. There are also logical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Codes of Recognition.Louis J. Goldberg & Leonard A. Rosenblum - 2014 - Biosemiotics 7 (2):279-298.
    This paper is divided into two parts. Part I focuses on the manner in which the components of the face recognition system work together so that a perceiver, within several hundred milliseconds after seeing a familiar face, is able to both identify the face of the perceived and recall elements of the history of past encounters with the perceived. Face recognition plays a crucial role in enabling both human and nonhuman primates to interact in collaborative social groups. This critical function (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Introduction: Mentis Naturalis. [REVIEW]Liz Stillwaggon Swan & Louis J. Goldberg - 2013 - Biosemiotics 6 (3):297-300.
  • A Human-Animal Relational Aesthetic: Towards a Zoophilic Representation of Animals in Art. [REVIEW]Phillip Pahin & Alyx Macfadyen - 2013 - Biosemiotics 6 (2):231-243.
    The systematic examination of the visual depiction of nonhuman animals by humans, and the representation of nonhuman animal imagery is an opportunity to observe varying degrees of anthropocentrism in the manner in which the nonhuman animal is represented. The investigation we present ventures beyond the traditional scope of post-modern human alterity and suggests that an Otherness status should be extended to encompass both the human animal and the nonhuman animal. An important motivation for seriously considering nonhuman animal experience is the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Biosemiotic Analysis of Braille.Louis J. Goldberg & Liz Stillwaggon Swan - 2011 - Biosemiotics 4 (1):25-38.
    Abstract A unique aspect of human communication is the utilization of sets of well- delineated entities, the morphology of which is used to encode the letters of the alphabet. In this paper, we focus on Braille as an exemplar of this phenomenon. We take a Braille cell to be a physical artifact of the human environment, into the structure of which is encoded a representation of a letter of the alphabet. The specific issue we address in this paper concerns an (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • On the Genetic and Epigenetic Bases of Primate Signal Processing.Louis J. Goldberg & Leonard A. Rosenblum - 2013 - Biosemiotics 6 (2):161-176.
    Four sequential, sub-processes are identified as the fundamental steps in the processing of signals by big-brained animals. These are, Detection of the signal, its Representation in correlated sensory brain structure, the Interpretation of the signal in another part of the brain and the Expression of the receiver’s response. We label this four-step spatiotemporal process DRIE. We support the view that when the context within which such signals are produced and received is relatively constant, the DRIE process can be ultimately assimilated (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Face Recognition and the Social Individual.Louis J. Goldberg - 2013 - Biosemiotics 6 (3):573-583.
    Face recognition depends upon the uniqueness of each human face. This is accomplished by the patterns formed by the unique relationship among face features. Unique face-patterns are produced by the intrusion of random factors into the process of biological growth and development. Processes are described which enable a unique face-pattern to be represented as a percept in the visual sensory system. The components of the face recognition system are analyzed as is the manner in which the precept is connected through (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation