Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Does Free Mean Without Value? And Is Free Ever Worth Stealing?Alison Baverstock & Clare Somerville - 2018 - Logos 29 (1):38-55.
    This paper considers a specific aspect of a practice-as-research project—the Kingston University Big Read. It explores how to achieve optimum attractiveness and perceived value among students and staff for a free book circulated for the purposes of a pre-arrival shared reading scheme. After consideration of the academic literature relating to the distribution of free books and the theft of books, there follows a detailed examination of marketing practice in the publishing industry relating to the dissemination of free and promotional items (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Theory of Monetary Intelligence: Money Attitudes—Religious Values, Making Money, Making Ethical Decisions, and Making the Grade.Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (3):583-603.
    This study explores the effect of a short ethics intervention—a chapter of business ethics in a business course—on perceptions of business courses and personal values toward making money and making ethical decisions and Monetary Intelligence. Since attitudes predict intentions and behaviors, Monetary Intelligence, a form of social intelligence, is defined as the extent to which individuals monitor their own monetary motive, behavior, and cognition; apply the information to evaluate critical concerns and options; select strategies to achieve financial goals; and reach (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Money is Power: Monetary Intelligence—Love of Money and Temptation of Materialism Among Czech University Students. [REVIEW]Soňa Lemrová, Eva Reiterová, Renáta Fatěnová, Karel Lemr & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2).
    In this study, we develop a theoretical model of monetary intelligence (MI), explore the extent to which individuals’ meaning of money is related to the pursuit of materialistic purposes, and test our model using the whole sample and across college major and gender. We select the 15-item love of money (LOM) construct—Factors Good, Evil (Affective), Budget (Behavioral), Achievement, and Power (Cognitive)—from the Money Ethic Scale and Factors Success and Centrality and two indicators—from the Materialism Scale. Based on our data collected (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Temptation, Monetary Intelligence (Love of Money), and Environmental Context on Unethical Intentions and Cheating.Jingqiu Chen, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Ningyu Tang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):1-23.
    In Study 1, we test a theoretical model involving temptation, monetary intelligence (MI), a mediator, and unethical intentions and investigate the direct and indirect paths simultaneously based on multiple-wave panel data collected in open classrooms from 492 American and 256 Chinese students. For the whole sample, temptation is related to low unethical intentions indirectly. Multi-group analyses reveal that temptation predicts unethical intentions both indirectly and directly for male American students only; but not for female American students. For Chinese students, both (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Does Moral Leadership Enhance Employee Creativity? Employee Identification with Leader and Leader–Member Exchange in the Chinese Context.Qinxuan Gu, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Wan Jiang - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (3):513-529.
    In this article, drawing from a relational perspective, we explore the relationship between moral leadership and employee creativity, treat employee identification with leader and leader–member exchange as two mediators, and develop a new theoretical model of employee creativity. Our data collected from 160 supervisor–subordinate dyads in the People’s Republic of China demonstrate that moral leadership is positively related to both employee identification with leader and LMX. Further, employee identification with leader partially mediates the relationship between moral leadership and LMX. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Fences as Controls to Reduce Accountants’ Rationalization.Alan Reinstein & Eileen Z. Taylor - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (3):477-488.
    Occupational fraud frequently involves the direct or indirect participation of professional accountants. To reduce fraud, companies often focus on the incentive/pressure and opportunity legs of the fraud triangle, perhaps believing that rationalization is beyond their control. We argue that rationalization reduction is necessary to minimize occupational fraud. We propose that educators and PA consider incorporating fences as controls to reduce rationalization. Because they focus on compliance and risk avoidance and are non-negotiable, fences appeal to accountant’s Myers Briggs personalities and conventional (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Coping Intelligence: Coping Strategies and Organizational Commitment Among Boundary Spanning Employees.Rajesh Srivastava & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (3):525-542.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Are You Satisfied With Your Pay When You Compare? It Depends on Your Love of Money, Pay Comparison Standards, and Culture.Thomas Tang & Roberto Luna-Arocas - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (2):279-289.
    We develop a theoretical model of income and pay comparison satisfaction with two mediators, examine the direct and the indirect paths of our model, and treat culture as a moderator. Based on 311 professors in the US and Spain, we demonstrate a positive direct path and a negative indirect path. Our subsequent multi-group analysis illustrates: For American professors, their direct path shows that income is directly related to high pay comparison satisfaction. Their indirect path reveals the following new insights: Professors (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Monetary Intelligence: Money Attitudes—Unethical Intentions, Intrinsic and Extrinsic Job Satisfaction, and Coping Strategies Across Public and Private Sectors in Macedonia.Elisaveta Gjorgji Sardžoska & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):93-115.
    Research suggests that attitudes guide individuals’ thinking and actions. In this study, we explore the monetary intelligence construct and investigate the relationships between a formative model of money attitudes involving affective, behavioral, and cognitive components and several sets of outcome variables—unethical intentions, intrinsic and extrinsic job satisfaction, and coping strategies. Based on 515 managers in the Republic of Macedonia, we test our model for the whole sample and also cross sector and gender. Managers’ negative stewardship behavior and positive cognitive meaning (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Teaching Critical Thinking Skills: Ability, Motivation, Intervention, and the Pygmalion Effect.M. Jill Austin, Thomas Tang & Larry Howard - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (1):133-147.
    Using a Solomon four-group design, we investigate the effect of a case-based critical thinking intervention on students’ critical thinking skills. We randomly assign 31 sessions of business classes to four groups and collect data from three sources: in-class performance, university records, and Internet surveys. Our 2 × 2 ANOVA results showed no significant between-subjects differences. Contrary to our expectations, students improve their critical thinking skills, with or without the intervention. Female and Caucasian students improve their critical thinking skills, but males (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • An Integrative Model of the Influence of Parental and Peer Support on Consumer Ethical Beliefs: The Mediating Role of Self-Esteem, Power, and Materialism.Elodie Gentina, L. J. Shrum, Tina M. Lowrey, Scott J. Vitell & Gregory M. Rose - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (4):1173-1186.
    What causes adolescents to develop consumer’ ethical beliefs? Prior research has largely focused on the negative influence of peers and negative patterns of parent–child interactions to explain risky and unethical consumer behaviors. We take a different perspective by focusing on the positive support of parents and peers in adolescent social development. An integrative model is developed that links parental and peer support with adolescents’ self-worth motives, their materialistic tendencies, and their consumer ethical beliefs. In a study of 984 adolescents, we (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • A Disposition-Based Fraud Model: Theoretical Integration and Research Agenda.Vasant Raval - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (3):741-763.
    For several decades, most discussion on financial fraud has centered on the fraud triangle, which has evolved over time through various extensions and re-interpretations. While this has served the profession well, the articulation of the human side of the act is indirect and diffused. To address this limitation, this research develops a model to explain the role of human desires, intentions, and actions in indulgence of, or resistance to, the act of financial fraud. Evidence from religion, philosophy, sociology, neurology, behavioral (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Do Parents and Peers Influence Adolescents’ Monetary Intelligence and Consumer Ethics? French and Chinese Adolescents and Behavioral Economics.Elodie Gentina, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Qinxuan Gu - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (1):115-140.
    Adolescents have increasing discretionary income, expenditures, and purchasing power. Inventory shrinkage costs $123.4 billion globally to retail outlets. Adolescents are disproportionately responsible for theft and shoplifting. Both parents and peers significantly influence adolescents’ monetary values, materialism, and dishonesty as consumers. In this study, we develop a theoretical model involving teenagers’ social attachment and their consumer ethics, treat adolescents’ money attitude in the context of youth materialism as a mediator, and simultaneously examine the direct and indirect paths. Results of 1018 adolescents (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Monetary Intelligence and Behavioral Economics Across 32 Cultures: Good Apples Enjoy Good Quality of Life in Good Barrels.Ningyu Tang, Jingqiu Chen, Martina Trontelj, Caroline Urbain, Theresa Tang, Allen Stembridge, Petar Skobic, Elisaveta Sardžoska, Marko Polic, Horia Pitariu, Ruja Pholsward, Francisco Pereira, Mehmet Özbek, AAhad Osman-Gani, Johnsto Osagie, Anthony Nnedum, Richard Mpoyi, Alice Moreira, Anna Manganelli, Eva Malovics, Jian Liang, Kilsun Kim, Ali Kazem, Chin-Kang Jen, Abdul Ibrahim, Consuelo Garcia de la Torre, Linzhi Du, Rosario Correia, Bor-Shiuan Cheng, Luigina Canova, Mark Borg, Abdulgawi Al-Zubaidi, Michael Allen, Adebowale Akande, Peter Vlerick, Roberto Luna-Arocas, Brigitte Charles-Pauvers, Randy Chiu, Ilya Garber, Fernando Arias-Galicia, Thompson Teo, Vivien Lim, Mahfooz Ansari, Toto Sutarso & Thomas Tang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (4):893-917.
    Monetary Intelligence theory asserts that individuals apply their money attitude to frame critical concerns in the context and strategically select certain options to achieve financial goals and ultimate happiness. This study explores the bright side of Monetary Intelligence and behavioral economics, frames money attitude in the context of pay and life satisfaction, and controls money at the macro-level and micro-level. We theorize: Managers with low love of money motive but high stewardship behavior will have high subjective well-being: pay satisfaction and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Monetary Intelligence and Behavioral Economics: The Enron Effect—Love of Money, Corporate Ethical Values, Corruption Perceptions Index , and Dishonesty Across 31 Geopolitical Entities.Modupe Adewuyi, Bolanle Adetoun, Ningyu Tang, Jingqiu Chen, Anna Manganelli, Luigina Canova, Martina Trontelj, Caroline Urbain, Theresa Tang, Allen Stembridge, Petar Skobic, Elisaveta Sardžoska, Marko Polic, Horia Pitariu, Ruja Pholsward, Francisco Pereira, Mehmet Özbek, AAhad Osman-Gani, Johnsto Osagie, Anthony Nnedum, Richard Mpoyi, Alice Moreira, Eva Malovics, Jian Liang, Kilsun Kim, Ali Kazem, Chin-Kang Jen, Abdul Ibrahim, Consuelo Garcia de la Torre, Linzhi Du, Rosario Correia, Bor-Shiuan Cheng, Mark Borg, Abdulgawi Al-Zubaidi, Michael Allen, Adebowale Akande, Peter Vlerick, Roberto Luna-Arocas, Brigitte Charles-Pauvers, Randy Chiu, Ilya Garber, Fernando Arias-Galicia, Thompson Teo, Vivien Lim, Mahfooz Ansari, Toto Sutarso & Thomas Tang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (4):919-937.
    Monetary intelligence theory asserts that individuals apply their money attitude to frame critical concerns in the context and strategically select certain options to achieve financial goals and ultimate happiness. This study explores the dark side of monetary Intelligence and behavioral economics—dishonesty. Dishonesty, a risky prospect, involves cost–benefit analysis of self-interest. We frame good or bad barrels in the environmental context as a proxy of high or low probability of getting caught for dishonesty, respectively. We theorize: The magnitude and intensity of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Does Bad Company Corrupt Good Morals? Social Bonding and Academic Cheating Among French and Chinese Teens.Elodie Gentina, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Qinxuan Gu - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):639-667.
    A well-known common wisdom asserts that strong social bonds undermine delinquency. However, there is little empirical evidence to substantiate this assertion regarding adolescence academic cheating across cultures. In this study, we adopt social bonding theory and develop a theoretical model involving four social bonds and adolescence self-reported academic cheating behavior and cheating perception. Based on 913 adolescents in France and China, we show that parental attachment, academic commitment, and moral values curb academic cheating; counterintuitively, peer involvement contributes to cheating. We (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Theory of Justice, OCB, and Individualism: Kyrgyz Citizens.Mehmet Ferhat Özbek, Mohammad Asif Yoldash & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (2):365-382.
    Research suggests that organizational justice has important impacts on work-related attitudes and behaviors, such as organizational citizenship behavior. In this article, we explore the extent to which individualism moderates the relationship between organizational justice and OCB among citizens in Kyrgyzstan. We make additional contributions to the literature because we know very little about these constructs in this former Soviet Union country, Kyrgyzstan, an under-researched and under-represented region of the world. Results of our data collected from 402 managers and employees in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations