Switch to: References

Citations of:

The Ethics of Authenticity

Harvard University Press (1992)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Honesty, Individualism, and Pragmatic Business Ethics: Implications for Corporate Hierarchy. [REVIEW]J. Kevin Quinn, J. David Reed, M. Neil Browne & Wesley J. Hiers - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1419-1430.
    The boundaries of honesty are the focal point of this exploration of the individualistic origins of modernist ethics and the consequent need for a more pragmatic approach to business ethics. The tendency of modernist ethics to see honesty as an individual responsibility is described as a contextually naive approach, one that fails to account for the interactive effects between individual choices and corporate norms. By reviewing the empirical accounts of managerial struggles with ethical dilemmas, the article arrives at the contextual (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Sense of Authentic Inner Compass as a Moral Resource Across Cultures: Possible Implications for Resisting Negative Peer-Pressure and for Parenting.Avi Assor, Moti Benita, Noam Yitshaki, Yael Geifman & Wisam Maree - 2020 - Journal of Moral Education 49 (3):346-364.
    ABSTRACT This paper focuses on a recently conceptualized construct—sense of authentic inner-compass —and two parenting practices promoting it: basic autonomy-support and inherent value-demonstration. Rooted in self-determination theory, sense of AIC refers to the perception that we have self-guiding values, aspirations, and goals, which function like an ‘authentic inner-compass’ that informs us on what we truly value and need. The utility of this construct for understanding morality-related phenomena also in cultures not emphasizing autonomy and authenticity, is demonstrated by a study conducted (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Critical Reflection on Codes of Conduct in Vocational Education.Richard G. Bagnall & Sonal Nakar - 2018 - Journal of Moral Education 47 (1):78-90.
    The contemporary cultural context may be seen as presenting a moral void in vocational education, sanctioning the ascendency of instrumental epistemology and a proliferation of codes of conduct, to which workplace actions are expected to conform. Important among the purposes of such codes is that of encouraging ethical conduct, but, true to their informing instrumental epistemology, they tend to assume that ethical conduct is a formal matter: a priori, extrinsic, deductive, universal, determinate, unproblematic, incontestable, constraining and selfless. However, the context (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Between Thick and Thin: Responding to the Crisis of Moral Education.Ariel Sarid - 2012 - Journal of Moral Education 41 (2):245-260.
    This article presents a moral orientation that can serve as a commonly shared foundation for developing moral consciousness in (postmodern) multicultural democratic societies. To this end, I distinguish between two prevailing generic views of moral education??thin? and ?thick??and claim that the tensions between them contribute to the sense of crisis of moral education (and public schooling in general). I begin by showing these tensions through a discussion of representatives of each side of the thin?thick dichotomy, as well as through Lickona?s (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ethics in Global Business and in a Plural Society.Ana Marta González - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 44 (1):23 - 36.
    The contemporary confluence of globalization and ethical pluralism is at the origin of many ethical challenges that confront business nowadays, both in practice and in theory. One of the challenges arising from the development of globalization has to do with respect for cultural diversity. It is often said that the success of economic globalization tends towards social and cultural homogeneity. To the extent that cultural diversity is usually seen as a valuable reality, that global trend seems to contradict our efforts (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Deep Brain Stimulation and the Search for Identity.Karsten Witt, Jens Kuhn, Lars Timmermann, Mateusz Zurowski & Christiane Woopen - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):499-511.
    Ethical evaluation of deep brain stimulation as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease is complicated by results that can be described as involving changes in the patient’s identity. The risk of becoming another person following surgery is alarming for patients, caregivers and clinicians alike. It is one of the most urgent conceptual and ethical problems facing deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease at this time. In our paper we take issue with this problem on two accounts. First, we elucidate what is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Institutional Leadership—the Historical Case Study of a Religious Organisation.Jose Bento da Silva - 2020 - In Harald Askeland, Gry Espedal & Beate Jelstad Løvaas (eds.), Understanding Values Work Institutional Perspectives in Organizations and Leadership.
    In this chapter, I discuss institutional leadership vis-à-vis the value of poverty. To do so, I analyse how poverty has been conceptualised within a Catholic religious organisation, the Jesuits. The chapter shows that, in the Jesuit case, poverty is not strictly defined. Instead, poverty results from the constant dialogue between the individual Jesuit and their leader. This means that the understanding of what constitutes poverty is neither explicit nor implicit. The chapter contributes to our understanding of institutional leadership as the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Tradition.Yaacov Yadgar - 2013 - Human Studies 36 (4):451-470.
    Noting the prevalence of a misguided suspicion towards tradition, as well as an overt misunderstanding of the very notion of tradition in certain academic circles, this essay seeks to outline some of the basic tenets of an alternative understanding of tradition, based on a ‘sociological’ reading of several major philosophical works. It does so by revisiting and synthesizing some well-known, highly influential conceptual arguments that, taken together, offer a compelling, comprehensive interpretation and understanding of tradition, which manages to avoid and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Watsuji Tetsurō’s Concept of “Authenticity”.Kyle Michael James Shuttleworth - 2019 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 11 (3):235-250.
    ABSTRACTThe translation of honraisei as “authenticity” has caused scholars to compare Watsuji with Heideggerian and Taylorian accounts of authenticity. In this article, it will be demonstrated that this translation of “authenticity” is misleading insofar as it suggests a sense of subjective individuality as prevalent within Western philosophical thought. However, rather than rejecting a Watsujian account of authenticity, it will be argued that we can salvage this understanding by rethinking honraisei as a distinctly Japanese approach to authenticity and one which is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Authenticity and Diversity: A Comparative Reading of Charles Taylor and Martin Heidegger.Edward Sherman - 2005 - Dialogue 44 (1):145-160.
    ABSTRACT: Authenticity and diversity have both become catch words in contemporary North Atlantic societies. What has not, however, been widely explored is the interrelation ofthese two ideas. To this end, the present article takes up the sometime convergent, sometime divergent writings of Charles Taylor and Martin Heidegger, drawing out their thoughts on authenticity and showing how they can serve as a ground for a new form of cultural diversity. For both, authentic being-in-the-world affords us access to our own deep reservoir (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Practising Applied Ethics with Philosophical Integrity: The Case of Business Ethics.Deon Rossouw - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (2):161-170.
    The unprecedented growth and demand for Applied Ethics since the last quarter of the previous century, has opened up a range of new opportunities for the discipline of Philosophy. While these new opportunities have been enthusiastically seized upon by some philosophers, others have frowned upon them or rejected them outright. In order to make sense of this demand for Applied Ethics training, I will first explore in general why this demand for Applied Ethics developed. I will then use the example (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Community of Educated People.Richard Pring - 1995 - British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (2):125 - 145.
    The article draws upon the work of two people, Lawrence Stenhouse and Derek Morrell, who in the 1960s offered a vision of education based upon,first, the moral conviction that a liberal and humane education was essential for all and for society, second, the belief in a curriculum agenda in which such moral conviction might be reconciled with moral uncertainty, and, third, the recognition of the indispensability of a democratic approach to making that reconciliation possible. The article shows how that vision (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Resolved and Unresolved Bioethical Authenticity Problems.Jesper Ahlin Marceta - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (1):1-14.
    Respect for autonomy is a central moral principle in bioethics. It is sometimes argued that authenticity, i.e., being “real,” “genuine,” “true to oneself,” or similar, is crucial to a person’s autonomy. Patients sometimes make what appears to be inauthentic decisions, such as when anorexia nervosa patients refuse treatment to avoid gaining weight, despite that the risk of harm is very high. If such decisions are inauthentic, and therefore non-autonomous, it may be the case they should be overridden for paternalist reasons. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Enhancement Technology and Outcomes: What Professionals and Researchers Can Learn From Those Skeptical About Cochlear Implants. [REVIEW]Patrick Kermit - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (4):367-384.
    This text presents an overview of the bioethical debate on pediatric cochlear implants and pays particular attention to the analysis of the Deaf critique of implantation. It dismisses the idea that Deaf concerns are primarily about the upholding of Deaf culture and sign language. Instead it is argued that Deaf skepticism about child rehabilitation after cochlear surgery is well founded. Many Deaf people have lived experiences as subjects undergoing rehabilitation. It is not the cochlear technology in itself they view as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Remembering Democracy.Richard Smith - 1993 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 12 (1):45-55.
  • Richard Peters and Valuing Authenticity.M. A. B. Degenhardt - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (Supplement s1):209-222.
    Richard Peters has been praised for the authenticity of his philosophy, and inquiry into aspects of the development of his philosophy reveals a profound authenticity. Yet authenticity is something he seems not to favour. The apparent paradox is resolved by observing historical changes in the understanding of authenticity as an important value. Possibilities are noted for further explorations as to how to understand and value it as an educational ideal.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Sphere Pluralism and Critical Individuality.T. Puolimatka - 2004 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (1):21-39.
    While discussing critical individuality as oneof the main goals of liberal education, theemphasis has usually been on direct educationalmeasures. Much less attention has been given tothe social preconditions for its development.This paper discusses the societal aspect of thequestion by employing the notion of spherepluralism. The attempt is to point out someways in which the diversified nature of societycan be employed in its full potential for thedevelopment of critical individuality. Thearticle aims to outline a form of spherepluralism, which is based on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Setting the Context: The Role Information Technology in a Business Ethics Course Based on Face-to-Face Dialogue. [REVIEW]Josep M. Lozano, Conxita Folguera & Daniel Arenas - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):99 - 111.
    Based on the experience of a course taught by the authors, this paper seeks to show that an adequate use of IT in the teaching of a Business Etchics (BE) course depends on clarifying the assumptions about ethics and the place of the course within a programme. For this purpose it explains how IT can be used to strengthen a view of BE based on dialogue and mutual learning and it encourages the combination between virtual and face-to-face teaching. Finally, the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Phronesis, Dialogue, and Hope: A Response to Nicholas Burbules.Hanan A. Alexander - 2019 - Ethics and Education 14 (2):138-142.
    ABSTRACTIn this essay I agree with Nicholas Burbules that ‘Phronesis’ is an ethical and political category that grounds the possibility of intercultural communication in translation from one particular context to another rather than in the presumption of one or another account of universalism. After a brief review of the development of this idea in key milestones of Western philosophy, I argue that it requires an education in dialogue across difference that can foster hope for peaceful coexistence among diverse traditions and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Identity, Citizenship and Moral Education.Laurance Splitter - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):484-505.
    Questions of identity such as ‘Who am I?’ are often answered by appeals to one or more affiliations with a specific nation (citizenship), culture, ethnicity, religion, etc. Taking as given the idea that identity over time—including identification and re-identification—for objects of a particular kind requires that there be criteria of identity appropriate to things of that kind, I argue that citizenship, as a ‘collectivist’ concept, does not generate such criteria for individual citizens, but that the concept person—which specifies the kind (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Reconceptualising Teaching as Transformative Practice: Alasdair MacIntyre in the South African Context.Dominic Griffiths & Maria Prozesky - 2020 - Journal of Education 2 (79):4-17.
    In its ideal conception, the post-apartheid education landscape is regarded as a site of transformation that promotes democratic ideals such as citizenship, freedom, and critical thought. The role of the educator is pivotal in realising this transformation in the learners she teaches, but this realisation extends beyond merely teaching the curriculum to the educator herself, as the site where these democratic ideals are embodied and enacted. The teacher is thus centrally placed as a moral agent whose behaviour, in the classroom (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Labouring Sleepwalker: Evocation and Expression as Modes of Qualitative Educational Research.Paul Smeyers - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):407-423.
    This paper deals with the highly personal way an individual makes sense of the world in a way that avoids the pitfalls of the so‐called private language. For Wittgenstein following a rule can never mean just following another rule, though we do follow rules blindly. His idea of the ‘form of life’ elicits that ‘what we do’ refers to what we have learnt, to the way in which we have learnt it and to how we have grown to find it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • What is Critical About Critical Pedagogy? Conflicting Conceptions of Criticism in the Curriculum.Hanan A. Alexander - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (10):903-916.
    In this paper, I explore the problems of cultivating a critical attitude in pedagogy given problems with accounts grounded in critical social theory, rational liberalism and pragmatic esthetic theory. I offer instead an alternative account of criticism for education in open, pluralistic, liberal, democratic societies called 'pedagogy of difference' that is grounded in the diversity liberalism of Isaiah Berlin and the dialogical philosophy of Martin Buber. In our current condition in which there is no agreement as to the proper criteria (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Thematic Approach to Theoretical Speculations in the Field of Educational Administration.Jae Park - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (4):359-371.
    The purpose of this article is a critical reflection on the field of educational administration and its varied and often conflicting epistemologies. It is argued that the field of educational administration is a community of diverse epistemologies. Although epistemological heterogeneity has been persistently vilified by both theorists and pragmatists with their own discursive agendas, it is this precise environment of critical dialogue and diversity that is conducive to new frontiers in the field. A phenomenology of recognition is thus presented as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Meaning of Life (Second Revised Edition).Thaddeus Metz - 2021 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    A 10,000+ word critical overview of analytic philosophy devoted to life's meaning, with some focus on books and more recent works.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Note on the Contingent Necessity of a Morphogenic Society and Human Flourishing.Jamie Morgan - 2017 - Journal of Critical Realism 16 (3):255-267.
    ABSTRACTThe Centre for Social Ontology working group project has been exploring the concept of a Morphogenic Society since 2013. The project is now drawing to a close. One of the arising issues from the project has been whether such a society can be and is liable to be one of human flourishing. In this short paper, I explore one possible aspect of the concept of a Morphogenic Society.1 A Morphogenic Society may involve issues of ‘contingent necessity’. Contingent necessity may provide (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • “Just a Swinging Door” – Examining the Egocentric Misconception of Meditation.Antti Wiljami Saari & Jani Pulkki - 2012 - Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Education Society 20 (2):15-24.
    Various kinds of contemplative practices have been a part of the western philosophical tradition since the Age of Antiquity. Today, however, philosophy as a way of life has ceased to be an integral part of academic practice. The capability to gain knowledge or understanding is believed to come out of pure intellectual endeavor, without exercising the mind and body holistically. This has created a blind spot for philosophy, where no profound pedagogical and moral transformation of subjectivity can be articulated. Furthermore, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Naturalistic and Supernaturalistic Disclosures: The Possibility of Relational Miracles.Amy Fisher Smith - 2010 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 10 (2):1-13.
    This paper explores naturalism and supernaturalism as modes of disclosure that reveal and conceal different aspects of relationality. Naturalism is presented as a worldview or set of philosophical assumptions that posits an objective world that is separable from persons and discoverable or describable via scientific methods. Because psychotherapy tacitly endorses many naturalistic assumptions, psychotherapy relationships may be limited to an instrumentalist ethic premised upon use-value and manipulability. Given these naturalistic limitations, relationships may require a supernatural component – a component which (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Palliation of Dying: A Heideggerian Analysis of the “Technologization” of Death.Franco A. Carnevale - 2005 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 5 (1):1-12.
    The modern West has vigorously sought to overcome death, or at the very least minimize the suffering that it entails. Whereas the former has been predominantly pursued through modern scientific medicine, the minimization of the adversity of death and dying has been sought through ‘death technologies’. This technologization of death is analyzed in light of Martin Heidegger’s phenomenological philosophy. The analysis begins with an outline of the fundamental tenets of Heidegger’s ‘philosophy of Being’. In turn, his philosophical framework is utilized (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Strong Evaluation and Weak Ontology. The Predicament of Charles Taylor.Michiel Meijer - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 75 (5):440-459.
    This paper aims to come to grips with the rich philosophy of Charles Taylor by focusing on his concept of ‘strong evaluation’. I argue that a close examination of this term brings out more clearly the continuing tensions in his writings as a whole. I trace back the origin of strong evaluation in Taylor’s earliest writings, and continue by laying out the different philosophical themes that revolve around it. Next, the focus is on the separate arguments in which strong evaluation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • True to Ourselves.Jan Bransen - 1998 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 6 (1):67 – 85.
    The paper addresses the problem of authenticity from a point of view that diverges from the more usual social, political, or moral approaches, by focusing very explicitly on the internal psychological make-up of human agents in an attempt to identify the conditions that would enable us to use the colloquial phrase 'being true to ourselves' in a way that is philosophically tenable. First, it is argued that the most important and problematic condition is the requirement that agents can be the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Suffering, Authenticity, and Physician Assisted Suicide.R. Ahlzen - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (3):353-359.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • To Die Well: The Phenomenology of Suffering and End of Life Ethics.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (3):335-342.
    The paper presents an account of suffering as a multi-level phenomenon based on concepts such as mood, being-in-the-world and core life value. This phenomenological account will better allow us to evaluate the hardships associated with dying and thereby assist health care professionals in helping persons to die in the best possible manner. Suffering consists not only in physical pain but in being unable to do basic things that are considered to bestow meaning on one’s life. The suffering can also be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Enhancement, Hybris, and Solidarity: A Critical Analysis of Sandel’s The Case Against Perfection.Ruud ter Meulen - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (3):397-405.
    This article presents a critical analysis of the views of Michael Sandel on human enhancement in his book The Case Against Perfection. Sandel argues that the use of biotechnologies for human enhancement is driven by a will to mastery or hybris, leading to an ‘explosion of responsibility’ and a disappearance of solidarity. I argue that Sandel is using a traditional concept of solidarity which leaves little room for individual differences and which is difficult to reconcile with the modern trend towards (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Assumptions and Moral Understanding of the Wish to Hasten Death: A Philosophical Review of Qualitative Studies.Andrea Rodríguez-Prat & Evert van Leeuwen - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):63-75.
    It is not uncommon for patients with advanced disease to express a wish to hasten death. Qualitative studies of the WTHD have found that such a wish may have different meanings, none of which can be understood outside of the patient’s personal and sociocultural background, or which necessarily imply taking concrete steps to ending one’s life. The starting point for the present study was a previous systematic review of qualitative studies of the WTHD in advanced patients. Here we analyse in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Issue of Being Touched.Betty-Ann Solvoll & Anders Lindseth - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (2):299-306.
    The purpose of this empirical paper is to shed light on the phenomenon of being touched in professional care practice. The study has a qualitative design and is a phenomenological hermeneutical exploration based on the story of a care provider. In her story, she describes how her interactions with a substance abuser touched her. The narrative data stems from dialogue with her colleagues and demonstrates a moral appeal and challenge in practical care. Investigations reveal that being touched is about allowing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Bioenhancements and the Telos of Medicine.Michael J. Young - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (4):515-522.
    Staggering advances in biotechnology within the past decade have given rise to pharmacological, surgical and prosthetic techniques capable of enhancing human functioning rather than merely treating or preventing disease. Bioenhancement technologies range from nootropics capable of enhancing cognitive abilities to distraction osteogenesis, a surgical technique capable of increasing height through limb lengthening. This paper examines whether the use of bioenhancements falls inside or outside the proper boundaries of healthcare, and if so, whether clinicians have professional responsibilities to administer bioenhancements to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Authenticity and Psychiatric Disorder: Does Autonomy of Personal Preferences Matter? [REVIEW]Manne Sjöstrand & Niklas Juth - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):115-122.
    In healthcare ethics there is a discussion regarding whether autonomy of personal preferences, what sometimes is referred to as authenticity, is necessary for autonomous decision-making. It has been argued that patients’ decisions that lack sufficient authenticity could be deemed as non-autonomous and be justifiably overruled by healthcare staff. The present paper discusses this issue in relation certain psychiatric disorders. It takes its starting point in recent qualitative studies of the experiences and thoughts of patients’ with anorexia nervosa where issues related (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • ‘Missing Persons’: Technical Terminology as a Barrier in Psychiatry.Ciaran Clarke - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (1):23-30.
    Several fields contributing to psychiatric advances, such as psychology, biology, and the humanities, have not yet met to produce a cohesive and integrated picture of human function and dysfunction, strength and vulnerability, etc., despite advances in their own areas. The failure may have its roots in a disagreement on what we mean by the human person and his or her relationship with the world, for which the incommensurate language of these disciplines may be partly to blame. Turns taken by western (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Assessing Lives, Giving Supernaturalism Its Due, and Capturing Naturalism: Reply to 13 Critics of Meaning in Life (Repr.).Thaddeus Metz - 2015 - In Masahiro Morioka (ed.), Reconsidering Meaning in Life: A Philosophical Dialogue with Thaddeus Metz. Waseda University. pp. 228-278.
    A lengthy reply to 13 critical discussions of _Meaning in Life: An Analytic Study_ collected in an e-book and reprinted from the _Journal of Philosophy of Life_. The contributors are from a variety of philosophical traditions, including the Anglo-American, Continental and East Asian (especially Buddhist and Japanese) ones.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Being Oneself in Another: Recognition and the Culturalist Deformation of Identity.Radu Neculau - 2012 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 55 (2):148-170.
    Abstract Nancy Fraser raises serious doubts about the critical potential of identity theories of recognition on the ground that they encourage the reduction of personal identity to cultural identity. Based on a comparative analysis of Charles Taylor's and Axel Honneth's theories of recognition, this paper argues that Fraser's critique is justified with respect to some aspects of Taylor's theory of identity, but not with respect to his conception of recognition, or to Honneth's conception of both identity and recognition. Taylor's theory (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Authentic Journalism? A Critical Discussion About Existential Authenticity in Journalism Ethics.Kristoffer Holt - 2012 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (1):2-14.
    Authenticity as an ideal is construed in general as an expression of existentialist unhappiness with the perceived dehumanization of man in modern society. Existential journalism can be seen as rejection of the demands of conformism and compromise of personal convictions that many journalists face. Ethically, existential journalism calls on journalists to live authentic lives, as private individuals as well as in their profession. This means to resist external pressures and to choose to follow a path that can be defended by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Education for Critical Moral Consciousness.Elena Mustakova-Possardt * - 2004 - Journal of Moral Education 33 (3):245-269.
    This paper proposes a lifespan developmental model of critical moral consciousness and examines its implications for education in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Mature moral consciousness, central to negotiating the challenges of the 21st century, is characterized by a deepening lifelong integration of moral motivation, agency and critical discernment. The paper describes the evolution of moral consciousness through three levels; pre?critical consciousness (pCC), transitional critical consciousness (tCC) and critical consciousness (CC) and eight chronologically ascending psychosocial themes. It focuses on the first (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Intellectual Autonomy, Epistemic Dependence and Cognitive Enhancement.J. Adam Carter - 2017 - Synthese:1-25.
    Intellectual autonomy has long been identified as an epistemic virtue, one that has been championed influentially by Kant, Hume and Emerson. Manifesting intellectual autonomy, at least, in a virtuous way, does not require that we form our beliefs in cognitive isolation. Rather, as Roberts and Wood note, intellectually virtuous autonomy involves reliance and outsourcing to an appropriate extent, while at the same time maintaining intellectual self-direction. In this essay, I want to investigate the ramifications for intellectual autonomy of a particular (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • A Pastoral Response to the Unhealed Wound of Gays Exacerbated by Indecision and Inarticulacy.Yolanda Dreyer - 2008 - HTS Theological Studies 64 (3):1235-1254.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Virtual Alterity and the Reformatting of Ethics.David Gunkel & Debra Hawhee - 2003 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (3-4):173-193.
    This article seeks to reconsider how traditional notions of ethics-ethics that privilege reason, truth, meaning, and a fixed conception of "the human"-are upended by digital technology, cybernetics, and virtual reality. We argue that prevailing ethical systems are incompatible with the way technology refigures the concepts and practices of identity, meaning, truth, and finally, communication. The article examines how both ethics and technology repurpose the liberal humanist subject even as they render such a subject untenable. Such an impasse reformats the question (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Autonomy and the Authority of Personal Commitments: From Internal Coherence to Social Normativity.Joel Anderson - 2003 - Philosophical Explorations 6 (2):90 – 108.
    It has been argued - most prominently in Harry Frankfurt's recent work - that the normative authority of personal commitments derives not from their intrinsic worth but from the way in which one's will is invested in what one cares about. In this essay, I argue that even if this approach is construed broadly and supplemented in various ways, its intrasubjective character leaves it ill-prepared to explain the normative grip of commitments in cases of purported self-betrayal. As an alternative, I (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Autonomy in Bioethics.Katerina Deligiorgi - 2016 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (2): 177-190.
    Autonomy in bioethics is coming under sustained criticism from a variety of perspectives. The criticisms, which target personal or individual autonomy, are largely justified. Moral conceptions of autonomy, such as Kant’s, on the other hand, cannot simply be applied in bioethical situations without moralizing care provision and recipience. The discussion concludes with a proposal for re-thinking autonomy by focusing on what different agents count as reasons for choosing one rather than another course of action, thus recognising their involvement in the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Christian Philosophical Anthropology. A Reformation Perspective.Gerrit Glas - 2010 - Philosophia Reformata 75 (2):141.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Morality, Culture and the Dialogic Self: Taking Cultural Pluralism Seriously.Helen Haste & Salie Abrahams - 2008 - Journal of Moral Education 37 (3):377-394.
    This paper explores moral reasoning within the framework of contemporary cultural theory, in which moral functioning is action mediated by tools (such as socially available discourses) within a social and cultural context. This cultural model of a dialogic moral self challenges many of the assumptions inherent in the individualistic Kantian position that underlies much moral reasoning research. It provides a model for understanding cultural variation in ethical systems as well as the social context in which individual reasoning operates and develops. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations