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  1. The Issue of Life: Aristotle in Nursing Perspective: Original Article.Ingunn Elstad - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):275-286.
    This paper explores the issue of life and its relevance to nursing, through Aristotle's philosophy and an Aristotelian interpretation of Nightingale's Notes on Nursing . Life as process and becoming has ontological status in Aristotle's philosophy and this dynamism is particularly relevant for nursing. The paper presents aspects of Aristotle's philosophy of life: his account of life as inherent powers of the individual, his analysis of change and time, and his understanding of sickness and health as qualitative states of living (...)
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  • Heat and Moisture, Rhetoric and Spiritus.Stephen Pender - 2014 - Intellectual History Review 24 (1):1-24.
  • Soul and Body.John Sutton - 2013 - In Peter Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 285-307.
    Ideas about soul and body – about thinking or remembering, mind and life, brain and self – remain both diverse and controversial in our neurocentric age. The history of these ideas is significant both in its own right and to aid our understanding of the complex sources and nature of our concepts of mind, cognition, and psychology, which are all terms with puzzling, difficult histories. These topics are not the domain of specialists alone, and studies of emotion, perception, or reasoning (...)
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  • Medicine in the Thought and Action of the Emperor Julian.Jeremy J. Swist - 2018 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 12 (1):13-38.
    _ Source: _Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 13 - 38 This paper assembles evidence from the full scope of Julian’s writings that the emperor had a pronounced interest in medicine and human health, which impacted both his rhetorical and real approach to political, philosophical, and religious problems. His initiatives aimed to promote doctors, medical research, and public health. He emphasized a holistic view of bodily and spiritual health in his version of theurgic Neoplatonism. Medical frames of reference also played an (...)
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  • A Theory of Group Rationality.Husain Sarkar - 1982 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 13 (1):55.
  • Rosewater and Philosophers’ Oil: Thermo‐Chemical Processing in Medieval and Early Modern Spanish Pharmacy.Paula De Vos - 2018 - Centaurus 60 (3):159-172.
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  • The Rise and Decline of Character: Humoral Psychology in Ancient and Early Modern Medical Theory.Jacques Bos - 2009 - History of the Human Sciences 22 (3):29-50.
    Humoralism, the view that the human body is composed of a limited number of elementary fluids, is one of the most characteristic aspects of ancient medicine. The psychological dimension of humoral theory in the ancient world has thus far received a relatively small amount of scholarly attention. Medical psychology in the ancient world can only be correctly understood by relating it to psychological thought in other fields, such as ethics and rhetoric. The concept that ties these various domains together is (...)
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  • The Construction of a New Form of Learning and Practing Medicine in Medieval Latin Europe.Luis García-Ballester - 1995 - Science in Context 8 (1):75-102.
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  • Brainhood, Anthropological Figure of Modernity.Fernando Vidal - 2009 - History of the Human Sciences 22 (1):5-36.
    If personhood is the quality or condition of being an individual person, brainhood could name the quality or condition of being a brain. This ontological quality would define the `cerebral subject' that has, at least in industrialized and highly medicalized societies, gained numerous social inscriptions since the mid-20th century. This article explores the historical development of brainhood. It suggests that the brain is necessarily the location of the `modern self', and that, consequently, the cerebral subject is the anthropological figure inherent (...)
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