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  1. Normatywność etyki cnót środowiskowych na przykładzie etyki Ronalda Sandlera. Komentarz. Dzwonkowska - 2017 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 8 (3).
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  • The Value of Nonhuman Nature: A Constitutive View.Roman Altshuler - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):469-485.
    A central question of environmental ethics remains one of how best to account for the intuitions generated by the Last Man scenarios; that is, it is a question of how to explain our experience of value in nature and, more importantly, whether that experience is justified. Seeking an alternative to extrinsic views, according to which nonhuman entities possess normative features that obligate us, I turn to constitutive views, which make value or whatever other limits nonhuman nature places on action dependent (...)
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  • Between Intrinsic and Extrinsic Value.James Harold - 2005 - Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (1):85–105.
    Moral philosophers who differ from one another on a wide range of questions tend to agree on at least one general point. Most believe that things are worth valuing either because of their relationship to something else worth valuing, or because they are simply (in themselves) worth valuing. I value my car, because I value getting to work; I value getting to work, because I value making money and spending time productively; and I value those things because I value leading (...)
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  • Is Environmental Virtue Ethics Anthropocentric?Dominika Dzwonkowska - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (6):723-738.
    Virtue ethics, due to its eudaimonistic character, is very anthropocentric; thus the application of VE to environmental ethics seems to be in contradiction with EE’s critical opinion of human centeredness. In the paper, I prove the claim that there is a possibility of elaborating an environmental virtue ethics that involves others. I prove that claim through analyzing Ronald Sandler’s EVE, especially his concept of pluralistic virtue and a pluralistic approach to the aim of ethical endeavor which is not only focused (...)
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  • Hume’s Knave and Nonanthropocentric Virtues.Paul Haught - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):129-43.
    This essay offers a critical assessment of environmental virtue ethics (EVE). Finding an environmental ethical analogy with Hume’s critique of the sensible knave, I argue that EVE is limited in much the same way as morality is on the Humean view. Advocates of nonanthropocentrism will find it difficult to engage those whose virtues comport them to anthropocentrism. Nonetheless, EVE is able to ground confidence in nonanthropocentric virtues by explicating specific key virtues, thereby holding open the possibility of bridging the motivational (...)
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  • Dominating Nature.Jason Brennan - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (4):513-528.
    Something is wrong with the desire to dominate nature. In this paper, I explain both the causes and solution to anti-environmental attitudes within the framework of Hegel's master–slave dialectic. I argue that the master–slave dialectic (interpreted as a metaphor, rather than literally) can provide reasons against taking an attitude of domination, and instead gives reasons to seek to be worthy of respect from nature, though nature cannot, of course, respect us. I then discuss what the social and economic conditions of (...)
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  • Environmental Virtue Ethics Special Issue: Introduction. [REVIEW]Philip Cafaro - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):3-7.
  • The Ethics of Historic Preservation.Erich Hatala Matthes - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (12):786-794.
    This article draws together research from various sub-disciplines of philosophy to offer an overview of recent philosophical work on the ethics of historic preservation. I discuss how philosophers writing about art, culture, and the environment have appealed to historical significance in crafting arguments about the preservation of objects, practices, and places. By demonstrating how it relates to core themes in moral and political philosophy, I argue that historic preservation is essentially concerned with ethical issues.
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  • An Agent-Centered Account of Rightness: The Importance of a Good Attitude.Elizabeth Foreman - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (5):941-954.
    This paper provides a sketch of an agent-centered way of understanding and answering the question, “What’s wrong with that?” On this view, what lies at the bottom of judgments of wrongness is a bad attitude; when someone does something wrong, she does something that expresses a bad, or inappropriate, attitude . In order to motivate this account, a general Kantian agent-centered ethics is discussed, as well as Michael Slote’s agent-based ethics, in light of analysis of the grounding role of attitudes (...)
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  • Hinduism and Environmental Ethics: An Analysis and Defense of a Basic Assumption.Christopher G. Framarin - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (1):75-91.
    The literature on Hinduism and the environment is vast, and growing quickly. It has benefitted greatly from the work of scholars in a wide range of disciplines, such as religious studies, Asian studies, history, anthropology, political science, and so on. At the same time, much of this work fails to define key terms and make fundamental assumptions explicit. Consequently, it is at least initially difficult to engage with it philosophically. In the first section of this paper, I clarify a central, (...)
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  • Nature Aesthetics and the Respect Argument.Glenn Parsons - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):411-418.
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  • All About Eve:A Report on Environmental Virtue Ethics Today.Robert Hull - 2005 - Ethics and the Environment 10 (1):89-110.
    In this paper I examine and assess an important developing trend in environmental ethics, environmental virtue ethics. I begin by providing a thorough survey of influential and representative contributions to environmental virtue ethics. Along with explaining these contributions to environmental virtue ethics I discuss their various strengths and weaknesses. In the second section I explain what I believe an environmental virtue ethic needs to do to complement other perspectives in environmental ethics. Then, using the best aspects of previously published work (...)
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  • Standing Humbly Before Nature.Lisa Gerber - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):39-53.
    : Humility is a virtue that is helpful in a persons relationship with nature. A humble person sees value in nature and acts accordingly with the proper respect. In this paper, humility is discussed in three aspects. First, humility entails an overcoming of self-absorption. Second, humility involves coming into contact with a larger, more complex reality. Third, humility allows a person to develop a sense of perspective on herself and the world.
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  • Finding Value in Nature.Thomas Hill - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (3):331 - 341.
    This paper explores the idea that a proper valuing of natural environments is essential to (and not just a natural basis for) a broader human virtue that might be called 'appreciation of the good'. This kind of valuing can explain, without any commitment to a metaphysics of intrinsic values, how and why it is good to value certain natural phenomena for their own sakes. The objection that such an approach is excessively human-centred is considered and rebutted.
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  • Could the Environment Acquire its Own Discourse?Byron Kaldis - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (3):73-103.
    This article addresses the question as to whether it is logically possible to fashion a discourse exclusively for the natural environment. Could such a discourse emerge without colonization by other social spheres acting as proxy? The prospects appear to be rather bleak, for even in the case of two apparently non-human-directed or non-committal discourses, that of extensionist ethics and new sophisticated management (of environmental crises), the latent social-constructionism built into both renders them monistic discourses hegemonically mapping the territories of what (...)
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  • Transcending Our Biology: A Virtue Ethics Interpretation of the Appeal to Nature in Technological and Environmental Ethics.Nin Kirkham - 2013 - Zygon 48 (4):875-889.
    “Arguments from nature” are used, and have historically been used, in popular responses to advances in technology and to environmental issues—there is a widely shared body of ethical intuitions that nature, or perhaps human nature, sets some limits on the kinds of ends that we should seek, the kinds of things that we should do, or the kinds of lives that we should lead. Virtue ethics can provide the context for a defensible form of the argument from nature, and one (...)
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  • Foundations of Wildlife Protection Attitudes.Eugene C. Hargrove - 1987 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 30 (1 & 2):3 – 31.
    The history of ideas normally invoked by animal liberationists and their opponents cannot account for our basic wildlife protection attitudes, which actually developed out of the worldwide species?classification project begun by Linnaeus in the eighteenth century. These attitudes, formed in terms of a pre?evolutionary and pre?ecological belief in fixed and immutable species, were weakened to some degree by the rise of evolutionary theory and ecological science, since evolution provides a mechanism for the replacement of extinct species and depicts extinction as (...)
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  • Finding Value in Nature.Thomas Hill - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (3):331-341.
    This paper explores the idea that a proper valuing of natural environments is essential to a broader human virtue that might be called 'appreciation of the good'. This kind of valuing can explain, without any commitment to a metaphysics of intrinsic values, how and why it is good to value certain natural phenomena for their own sakes. The objection that such an approach is excessively human-centred is considered and rebutted.
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  • Reconsidering Approaches to Moral Status.Kristian Skagen Ekeli & Espen Gamlund - 2011 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (3):361 - 375.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 3, Page 361-375, October 2011.
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  • Moral Progress and Canada's Climate Failure.Byron Williston - 2011 - Journal of Global Ethics 7 (2):149 - 160.
    In a recent letter to Canada's national newspaper, The Globe and Mail, British columnist and climate change gadfly George Monbiot pleaded with Canada to clean up its greenhouse gas emissions act. The letter appeared just a week before the Copenhagen climate conference. In it, Monbiot alleged that Canada's newly acquired status as oil superpower threatens to ?brutalize? the country, as it has other oil-rich countries (Monbiot, G. 2009. Please, Canada, clean up your act, The Globe and Mail, November 30, A15). (...)
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