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  1. The Technological Fix Criticisms and the Agricultural Biotechnology Debate.Dane Scott - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (3):207-226.
    A common tactic in public debates over science and technology is to dismissively label innovations as mere technological fixes. This tactic can be readily observed in the long debate over agricultural biotechnology. While these criticisms are often superficial rhetorical tactics, they point to deeper philosophical disagreements about the role of technology in society. Examining the technological fix criticism can clarify these underlying philosophical disagreements and the debate over biotechnology. The first part of this essay discusses the origins of the notion (...)
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  • Are Farmers of the Middle Distinctively “Good Stewards”? Evidence From the Missouri Farm Poll, 2006.Harvey S. James & Mary K. Hendrickson - 2010 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (6):571-590.
    In this paper we consider the question of whether middle-scale farmers, which we define as producers generating between $100,000 and $250,000 in sales annually, are better agricultural stewards than small and large-scale producers. Our study is motivated by the argument of some commentators that farmers of this class ought to be protected in part because of the unique attitudes and values they possess regarding what constitutes a “good farmer.” We present results of a survey of Missouri farmers designed to assess (...)
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  • Ethics, Narrative, and Agriculture: Transforming Agricultural Practice Through Ecological Imagination. [REVIEW]A. Whitney Sanford - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (3):283-303.
    The environmental degradation caused by industrial agriculture, as well as the resulting social and health consequences, creates an urgency to rethink food production by expanding the moral imagination to include agricultural practices. Agricultural practices presume human use of the earth and acknowledge human dependence on the biotic community, and these relations mean that agriculture presents a separate set of considerations in the broader field of environmental ethics. Many scholars and activists have argued persuasively that we need new stories to rethink (...)
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  • Towards a Systemic Research Methodology in Agriculture: Rethinking the Role of Values in Science.Hugo Fjelsted Alrøe & Erik Steen Kristensen - 2002 - Agriculture and Human Values 19 (1):3-23.
    The recent drastic development of agriculture, together with the growing societal interest in agricultural practices and their consequences, pose a challenge to agricultural science. There is a need for rethinking the general methodology of agricultural research. This paper takes some steps towards developing a systemic research methodology that can meet this challenge – a general self-reflexive methodology that forms a basis for doing holistic or (with a better term) wholeness-oriented research and provides appropriate criteria of scientific quality.From a philosophy of (...)
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  • Losing Ground: Farmland Preservation, Economic Utilitarianism, and the Erosion of the Agrarian Ideal.Matthew J. Mariola - 2005 - Agriculture and Human Values 22 (2):209-223.
    The trajectory of the public discourse on agriculture in the twentieth century presents an interesting pattern:shortly after World War II, the manner in which farming and farmers were discussed underwent a profound shift. This rhetorical change is revealed by comparing the current debate on farmland preservation with a tradition of agricultural discourse that came before, known as “agrarianism.” While agrarian writers conceived of farming as a rewarding life, a public good, and a source of moral virtue, current writers on farmland (...)
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  • Book Symposium on The Agrarian Vision: Sustainability and Environmental Ethics by Paul B. Thompson: The University Press of Kentucky 2010. [REVIEW]Per Sandin, Erland Mårald, Aidan Davison, David E. Nye & Paul B. Thompson - 2013 - Philosophy and Technology 26 (3):301-320.
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  • Precision Livestock Farming and Farmers’ Duties to Livestock.Ian Werkheiser - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (2):181-195.
    Precision livestock farming promises to allow modern, large-scale farms to replicate, at scale, caring farmers who know their animals. PLF refers to a suite of technologies, some only speculative. The goal is to use networked devices to continuously monitor individual animals on large farms, to compare this information to expected norms, and to use algorithms to manage individual animals automatically. Supporters say this could not only create an artificial version of the partially mythologized image of the good steward caring for (...)
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  • Utilizing a Social Ethic Toward the Environment in Assessing Genetically Engineered Insect-Resistance in Trees.R. R. James - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (3):237-249.
    Social policies are used to regulate how members of a society interact and share resources. If we expand our sense of community to include the ecosystem of which we are a part, we begin to develop an ethical obligation to this broader community. This ethic recognizes that the environment has intrinsic value, and each of us, as members of society, are ethically bound to preserve its sustainability. In assessing the environmental risks of new agricultural methods and technologies, society should not (...)
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  • The Magic Bullet Criticism of Agricultural Biotechnology.Dane Scott - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (3):189-197.
    One common method of criticizing genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is to label them as “magic bullets.” However, this criticism, like many in the debate over GMOs, is not very clear. What exactly is the “magic bullet criticism”? What are its origins? What flaw is it pointing out in GM crops and agricultural biotechnology? What is the scope of the criticism? Does it apply to all GMOs, or just some? Does it point to a fatal flaw, or something that can be (...)
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  • Beyond Modernization: Development Cooperation as Normative Practice.Corné J. Rademaker & Henk Jochemsen - 2018 - Philosophia Reformata 83 (1):111-139.
    In 2010, the Dutch Scientific Council for Governmental Policy called for an explicit and adequate intervention ethics for policy on international development cooperation. Yet, as appears from a careful reading of their report, the council’s own overall commitment to a modernist worldview hinders the fruitful development of such an intervention ethics. There is, however, a strand in their thinking that draws attention to the importance of practical knowledge. We argue specifically that an intervention ethics for development cooperation in agriculture should (...)
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  • Industrial Farm Animal Production: A Comprehensive Moral Critique.John Rossi & Samual A. Garner - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):479-522.
    Over the past century, animal agriculture in the United States has transformed from a system of small, family farms to a largely industrialized model—often known as ‘industrial farm animal production’ (IFAP). This model has successfully produced a large supply of cheap meat, eggs and dairy products, but at significant costs to animal welfare, the environment, the risk of zoonotic disease, the economic and social health of rural communities, and overall food abundance. Over the past 40 years, numerous critiques of IFAP (...)
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  • Considering The Spirit of the Soil by Paul B. Thompson.Carolyn Raffensperger, Mora Campbell & Paul B. Thompson - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):161-176.
  • 1996 Presidential Address to the Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society.Kate Clancy - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (2):111-114.
    Concerns about values and caring in the USA are being widelyvoiced in many sectors of the society, including agriculture.The time seems right to bring new ideas about the ethics ofagriculture and eating into public discourse. The Society iswell situated to initiate the dialogue, and Paul Thompson'sbook {\it Spirit of the Soil} provides an excellentstarting point.
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  • Science Policy and Moral Purity: The Case of Animal Biotechnology.Paul B. Thompson - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (1):11-27.
    Public controversy over animalbiotechnology is analyzed as a case that illustratestwo broad theoretical approaches for linking science,political or ethical theory, and public policy. Moralpurification proceeds by isolating the social,environmental, animal, and human health impacts ofbiotechnology from each other in terms of discretecategories of moral significance. Each of thesecategories can also be isolated from the sense inwhich biotechnology raises religious or metaphysicalissues. Moral purification yields a comprehensive andsystematic account of normative issues raised bycontroversial science. Hybridization proceeds bytaking concern for all these (...)
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  • Liberalism and the Two Directions of the Local Food Movement.Samantha Noll - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):211-224.
    The local food movement is, increasingly, becoming a part of the modern American landscape. However, while it appears that the local food movement is gaining momentum, one could question whether or not this trend is, in fact, politically and socially sustainable. Is local food just another trend that will fade away or is it here to stay? One way to begin addressing this question is to ascertain whether or not it is compatible with liberalism, a set of influential political theories (...)
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  • Adapting Agriculture to a Changing Climate: A Social Justice Perspective.Cristian Timmermann - 2021 - In Hanna Schübel & Ivo Wallimann-Helmer (eds.), Justice and food security in a changing climate. Wageningen Academic Publishers. pp. 31-35.
    We are already past the point where climate change mitigation alone does not suffice and major efforts need to be undertaken to adapt agriculture to climate change. As this situation was both foreseeable and avoidable, it is urgent to see that particularly people who have historically contributed the least to climate change do not end up assuming most of the costs. Climate change will have the worst effects on agriculture in the tropical region in the form of droughts, extreme heat (...)
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  • Do Christians Have a Moral Obligation To Support Agricultural Biotechnology?Judith N. Scoville - 2001 - Studies in Christian Ethics 14 (2):42-50.
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  • Selective Ignorance and Agricultural Research.Kevin C. Elliott - 2012 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 38 (3):328-350.
    Scholars working in science and technology studies have recently argued that we could learn much about the nature of scientific knowledge by paying closer attention to scientific ignorance. Building on the work of Robert Proctor, this article shows how ignorance can stem from a wide range of selective research choices that incline researchers toward partial, limited understandings of complex phenomena. A recent report produced by the International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science, and Technology for Development serves as the article’s central (...)
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  • Handbook of Rural Studies (Book Review). [REVIEW]Paul Thompson - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):137-138.
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  • Book Review: Albert Howard Soil and Health + Julie Guthman, Agrarian Dreams. [REVIEW]Paul B. Thompson - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (3):297-301.
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  • Unifying Agricultural and Environmental Ethics.Evelyn Brister - 2019 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 22 (3):251-258.
    ABSTRACTPaul B. Thompson’s agrarian ethic aims to unite the core agricultural value of providing sustenance for people with the environmental value of preserving nature into the future. His recentl...
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  • Smells Like Team Spirit: A Response to Comments on The Spirit of the Soil.Paul B. Thompson - 2019 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 22 (3):259-266.
    ABSTRACTThe Spirit of the Soil was updated for its 2nd edition in 2017. Three comments on the update are addressed here. First, productionism was not intended as a explanation of farm management de...
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  • Displacing the Productionist Paradigm: A Comment on Paul Thompson's Spirit of the Soil, 2nd Edition.Clark Wolf - 2019 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 22 (3):235-242.
    Paul Thompson's book The Spirit of the Soil first appeared in 1995, and has been re-issued in a new edition in 2017. This comment on the new edition addresses Thompson's argument concerning the pro...
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  • Symposium Introduction Eric Katz's Nature as Subject.Andrew Light - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):102-108.
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  • The Fat of the Land: Linking American Food Overconsumption, Obesity, and Biodiversity Loss. [REVIEW]Philip J. Cafaro, Richard B. Primack & Robert L. Zimdahl - 2006 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (6):541-561.
    Americans’ excessive consumption of food harms their health and quality of life and also causes direct and indirect environmental degradation, through habitat loss and increased pollution from agricultural fertilizers and pesticides. We show here that reducing food consumption could improve Americans’ health and well-being while facilitating environmental benefits ranging from establishing new national parks and protected areas to allowing more earth-friendly farming and ranching techniques. We conclude by considering various public policy initiatives to lower per capita caloric intake and excessive (...)
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  • Farmers Engaged in Deliberative Practices; An Ethnographic Exploration of the Mosaic of Concerns in Livestock Agriculture.Clemens Driessen - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):163-179.
    A plethora of ethical issues in livestock agriculture has emerged to public attention in recent decades, of which environmental and animal welfare concerns are but two, albeit prominent, themes. For livestock agriculture to be considered sustainable, somehow these interconnected themes need to be addressed. Ethical debate on these issues has been extensive, but mostly started from and focused on single issues. The views of farmers in these debates have been largely absent, or merely figured as interests, instead of being considered (...)
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  • Environmental Duty of Care: From Ethical Principle Towards a Code of Practice for the Grazing Industry in Queensland (Australia). [REVIEW]Romy Greiner - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):527-547.
    Among the options of government for reducing negative environmental externalities from agriculture is the institution of a polluter statutory liability. An environmental duty of care imposes a statutory liability on agents who interact with the environment to avoid causing environmental harm. This paper documents environmental duty of care provisions governing landholders in Queensland, Australia, with specific reference to the 2007 Queensland State Rural Leasehold Land Strategy. The paper reports on a positive response by a group of leaseholders within the Northern (...)
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  • History Lessons: What Urban Environmental Ethics Can Learn From Nineteenth Century Cities.Samantha Noll - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (1):143-159.
    In this paper, I outline valuable insights that current theorists working in urban environmental ethics can gain from the analysis of nineteenth century urban contexts. Specifically, I argue that an analysis of urban areas during this time reveals two sets of competing metaphysical commitments that, when accepted, shift both the design of urban environments and our relationship with the natural world in these contexts. While one set of metaphysical commitments could help inform current projects in urban environmental ethics, the second (...)
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  • My Decision to Sell the Family Farm.Geoff Kuehne - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (2):203-213.
    This paper presents a discussion of my personal experiences of selling a family farm and analyses those experiences using the layered account form of autoethnographic writing. I describe how the cultural influences from family farming led me, a farmer’s son, to also become a farmer, why farmers may choose to continue in their occupation sometimes against increasingly negative economic pressures, why I continued farming for as long as I did, and the thoughts and feelings associated with my decision to sell (...)
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  • Norton’s Sustainability: Some Comments on Risk and Sustainability.Paul B. Thompson - 2007 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (4):375-386.
    Bryan Norton’s 2005 book Sustainability describes a pragmatic approach to environmental philosophy that stresses philosophy’s role as one of mediating between scientific and ordinary language. But on two topics, Norton’s approach is not pragmatic enough. In the case of his discussion of risk, he accedes to a scientific notion that fails to acknowledge the way that ordinary usage of the word risk involves pragmatic links to human action and moral responsibility. With respect to the word sustainability, his analysis fails to (...)
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  • Agrarian Philosophy and Ecological Ethics.Paul B. Thompson - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):527-544.
    Mainstream environmental ethics grew out of an approach to value that was rooted in a particular conception of rationality and rational choice. As weaknesses in this approach have become more evident, environmental philosophers have experimented with both virtue ethics and with pragmatism as alternative starting points for developing a more truly ecological orientation to environmental philosophy. However, it is possible to see both virtue ethics and pragmatism as emerging from older philosophical traditions that are here characterized as “agrarian.” Agrarian philosophy (...)
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  • Enchanted (and Disenchanted) Amazonia: Environmental Ethics and Cultural Identity in Northern Brazil.Scott William Hoefle - 2009 - Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (1):107-130.
    Socio-spatial diversity of environmental ethics and regional-ethnic identity in northern Brazil is examined with the aim of presenting a culturally complex account of Amazonian worldviews in the making. These worldviews involve the variable merging of Amerindian, riverine peasant and new settler beliefs. Interpretative and empiricist textual strategies are juxtaposed in order to explore both broad human-environmental relations, as seen through the prism of enchanted and disenchanted worldviews, as well as the subtlety of belief and disbelief in specific elements of worldview, (...)
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  • Freedom of Cropping and the Good Life: Political Philosophy and the Conflict Between the Organic Movement and the Biotech Industry Over Cross-Contamination.Dane Scott - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (5):837-852.
    This paper begins by describing recent controversies over cross-contamination of crops in the United States and European Union. The EU and US are both applying the principle of freedom of cropping to resolve these conflicts, which is based on an individualistic philosophy. However, despite the EU and the US starting with the principle of freedom of cropping they have very dissimilar regulatory regimes for coexistence. These contradictory policies based upon the same principle are creating different sets of winners and losers. (...)
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