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  1. Hubristic and Authentic Pride as Serial Homologues: The Same but Different.Jason A. Clark - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (4):397-398.
    Tracy, Shariff, and Cheng (2010) propose that human pride has two facets (hubristic pride [HP] and authentic pride [AP]) which, despite their similarities, diverge in important ways, including their evolutionary histories and functions. Put simplistically, AP emerged from HP. While AP and HP are thus homologous, HP continues to exist in humans, alongside AP. This is problematic on the most common interpretation of homology, in which an ancestral trait transforms into a derived trait, but does not remain present independently. I (...)
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  • Further Thoughts on the Evolution of Pride’s Two Facets: A Response to Clark.Azim F. Shariff, Jessica L. Tracy, Joey T. Cheng & Joseph Henrich - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (4):399-400.
    In Clark’s thoughtful analysis of the evolution of the two facets of pride, he suggests that the concurrent existence of hubristic and authentic pride in humans represents a “persistence problem,” wherein the vestigial trait (hubristic pride) continues to exist alongside the derived trait (authentic pride). In our view, evidence for the two facets does not pose a persistence problem; rather, hubristic and authentic pride both likely evolved as higher-order cognitive emotions that solve uniquely human—but distinct— evolutionary problems. Instead of being (...)
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  • A Linguist’s View of “Pride”.Anna Gladkova - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (2):178-179.
    This commentary offers a linguistic perspective on “pride”. On the basis of a semantic analysis it demonstrates that the interpretation of pride put forward by Tracy, Shariff, and Cheng (2010) is Anglocentric and is consistent with the contemporary use of the English word pride. It compares the English concept of pride with the Russian concept of gordit’sja and demonstrates their differences. It calls for a psychological account of “pride” free from an ethnocentric bias.
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  • Pride in Parsimony.Lisa A. Williams & David DeSteno - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (2):180-181.
    Tracy, Shariff, and Cheng (2010) present a timely and eloquent review of the current research on the emotion pride in terms of a naturalist framework. The present commentary not only echoes arguments relating to pride’s adaptive function, but also highlights some points of theoretical clarification. Specifically, we question the necessity of the naturalist approach and the emphasis on two facets of pride.
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  • Admiration: A Conceptual Review.Diana Onu, Thomas Kessler & Joanne R. Smith - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (3):218-230.
    Admiration is thought to have essential functions for social interaction: it inspires us to learn from excellent models, to become better people, and to praise others and create social bonds. In intergroup relations, admiration for other groups leads to greater intergroup contact, cooperation, and help. Given these implications, it is surprising that admiration has only been researched by a handful of authors. In this article we review the literature, focusing on the definition of admiration, links to related emotions, measurement, antecedents, (...)
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  • Bodily Communication of Emotion: Evidence for Extrafacial Behavioral Expressions and Available Coding Systems.Zachary Witkower & Jessica L. Tracy - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (2):184-193.
    Although scientists dating back to Darwin have noted the importance of the body in communicating emotion, current research on emotion communication tends to emphasize the face. In this article we review the evidence for bodily expressions of emotions—that is, the handful of emotions that are displayed and recognized from certain bodily behaviors. We also review the previously developed coding systems available for identifying emotions from bodily behaviors. Although no extant coding system provides an exhaustive list of bodily behaviors known to (...)
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  • Four Models of Basic Emotions: A Review of Ekman and Cordaro, Izard, Levenson, and Panksepp and Watt. [REVIEW]Jessica L. Tracy & Daniel Randles - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):397-405.
    In this special section, Ekman and Cordaro (2011); Izard (2011); Levenson (2011); and Panksepp and Watt (2011) have each outlined the latest instantiation of each lead author’s theoretical model of basic emotions. We identify four themes emerging from these models, and discuss areas of agreement and disagreement. We then briefly evaluate the models’ usefulness by examining how they would account for an emotion that has received considerable empirical attention but does not fit clearly within or outside of the basic emotion (...)
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  • Appraisal in the Emotion System: Coherence in Strategies for Coping.Ira J. Roseman - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):141-149.
    Emotions can be understood as a coherent, integrated system of general-purpose coping strategies, guided by appraisal, for responding to situations of crisis and opportunity (when specific-purpose motivational systems may be less effective). This perspective offers functional explanations for the presence of particular emotions in the emotion repertoire, and their elicitation by particular appraisal combinations. Implications of the Emotion System model for debated issues, such as the dimensional vs. discrete nature of appraisals and emotions, are also discussed.
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  • Basic Emotions and the Rocks of New Hampshire.Phoebe C. Ellsworth - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (1):21-26.
    This article describes James’s distaste for taxonomic classification of emotion and argues that he would not have been pleased by current scholarship which still focuses on the definition and classification of discrete emotions, distracting scholars from more fundamental underlying processes. I argue that as in James’s time, current taxonomies are still arbitrary and still constrain the kinds of questions psychologists ask.
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  • Self-Evaluative and Other-Directed Emotional and Behavioral Responses to Gossip About the Self.Elena Martinescu, Onne Janssen & Bernard A. Nijstad - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Pride and Social Status.Henrietta Bolló, Beáta Bőthe, István Tóth-Király & Gábor Orosz - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • What Matters Emotionally: The Importance of Pride for Cumulative Culture.Jessica L. Tracy - 2020 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 43.
    Osiurak and Reynaud highlight a major omission of models of cumulative technological culture. I propose an additional problematic omission: pride. By taking this emotion into account, we can address the question of why humans seek to learn, teach, and innovate – three processes essential to cumulative technological culture. By fostering achievement, prestige, and social learning, pride provides a pivotal piece of the puzzle.
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  • Neuroscience Findings Are Consistent with Appraisal Theories of Emotion; but Does the Brain “Respect” Constructionism?Klaus R. Scherer - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):163-164.
    I reject Lindquist et al.'s implicit claim that all emotion theories other than constructionist ones subscribe to a approach. The neural mechanisms underlying relevance detection, reward, attention, conceptualization, or language use are consistent with many theories of emotion, in particular componential appraisal theories. I also question the authors' claim that the meta-analysis they report provides support for the specific assumptions of constructionist theories.
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  • The Role of the Amygdala in the Appraising Brain.David Sander, Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):161.
    Lindquist et al. convincingly argue that the brain implements psychological operations that are constitutive of emotion rather than modules subserving discrete emotions. However, the nature of such psychological operations is open to debate. I argue that considering appraisal theories may provide alternative interpretations of the neuroimaging data with respect to the psychological operations involved.
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  • The Sleeping Brain and the Neural Basis of Emotions.Roumen Kirov, Serge Brand, Vasil Kolev & Juliana Yordanova - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):155-156.
    In addition to active wake, emotions are generated and experienced in a variety of functionally different states such as those of sleep, during which external stimulation and cognitive control are lacking. The neural basis of emotions can be specified by regarding the multitude of emotion-related brain states, as well as the distinct neuro- and psychodynamic stages (generation and regulation) of emotional experience.
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  • Pride, Achievement, and Purpose.Antti Kauppinen - 2017 - In J. Adam Carter & Emma C. Gordon (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Pride. London: Rowman and Littlefield.
    Pride in our own actions tells a story: we faced a challenge, overcame it, and achieved something praiseworthy. In this paper, I draw on recent psychological literature to distinguish to between two varieties of pride, 'authentic' pride that focuses on particular efforts (like guilt) and 'hubristic' pride that focuses on the whole self (like shame). Achievement pride is fitting when either efforts or traits explain our success in meeting contextually relevant, authoritative, and challenging standards without excessive opportunity cost. When it (...)
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  • Suffering in Sport: Why People Willingly Embrace Negative Emotional Experiences.Michael S. Brady - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):115-128.
    ABSTRACTNearly everyone agrees that physical pain is bad. Indeed, if anything merits the status of a platitude in our everyday thinking about value, the idea that pain is bad surely does. Equally,...
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  • Cross-Cultural Evidence That the Nonverbal Expression of Pride is an Automatic Status Signal.Jessica L. Tracy, Azim F. Shariff, Wanying Zhao & Joseph Henrich - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):163.
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  • Integrating Basic and Higher-Cognitive Emotions Within a Common Evolutionary Framework: Lessons From the Transformation of Primate Dominance Into Human Pride.Jason Clark - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):437-460.
    Many argue that higher-cognitive emotions such as pride arose de novo in humans, and thus fall outside of the scope of the kinds of evolutionary explanations offered for ?basic emotions,? like fear. This approach fractures the general category of ?emotion? into two deeply distinct kinds of emotion. However, an increasing number of emotion researchers are converging on the conclusion that higher-cognitive emotions are evolutionarily rooted in simpler emotional responses found in primates. I argue that pride fits this pattern, and then (...)
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  • What Are Emotions and How Are They Created in the Brain?Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Eliza Bliss-Moreau, Hedy Kober & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):172-202.
    In our response, we clarify important theoretical differences between basic emotion and psychological construction approaches. We evaluate the empirical status of the basic emotion approach, addressing whether it requires brain localization, whether localization can be observed with better analytic tools, and whether evidence for basic emotions exists in other types of measures. We then revisit the issue of whether the key hypotheses of psychological construction are supported by our meta-analytic findings. We close by elaborating on commentator suggestions for future research.
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  • Competence and the Evolutionary Origins of Status and Power in Humans.Bernard Chapais - 2015 - Human Nature 26 (2):161-183.
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  • Is Pride a Prosocial Emotion? Interpersonal Effects of Authentic and Hubristic Pride.Maarten J. J. Wubben, David De Cremer & Eric van Dijk - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (6):1084-1097.
  • Status Signals: Adaptive Benefits of Displaying and Observing the Nonverbal Expressions of Pride and Shame.Jason P. Martens, Jessica L. Tracy & Azim F. Shariff - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (3):390-406.
  • Arrogant or Self-Confident? The Use of Contextual Knowledge to Differentiate Hubristic and Authentic Pride From a Single Nonverbal Expression.Jessica L. Tracy & Christine Prehn - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (1):14-24.