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Martino Traxler & Mark H. Bernstein (2000). On Moral Considerability: An Essay on Who Morally Matters.

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    The Science of Listening in Bioacoustics Research: Sensing the Animals' Sounds.Mickey Vallee - 2018 - Theory, Culture and Society 35 (2):47-65.
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    Moral Status, Final Value, and Extrinsic Properties.Nicolas Delon - 2014 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (3pt3):371-379.
    Starting from a distinction between intrinsic and final value, I explore the implications of the supervenience of final value on extrinsic properties regarding moral status. I make a case for ‘extrinsic moral status’ based on ‘extrinsic final value’. I show that the assumption of ‘moral individualism’, that moral status supervenes merely on intrinsic properties, is misguided, and results from a conflation of intrinsic with final value. I argue that at least one extrinsic property, namely vulnerability, can be the basis of (...)
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    An Empirically Informed Critique of Habermas' Argument From Human Nature.Nicolae Morar - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics (1):1-19.
    In a near-future world of bionics and biotechnology, the main ethical and political issue will be the definition of who we are. Could biomedical enhancements transform us to such an extent that we would be other than human? Habermas argues that any genetic enhancement intervention that could potentially alter ‘human nature’ should be morally prohibited since it alters the child’s nature or the very essence that makes the child who he is. This practice also commits the child to a specific (...)
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