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Sean Valentine & Tim Barnett (2002). Ethics Codes and Sales Professionals' Perceptions of Their Organizations' Ethical Values.

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  1. The Presence of Ethics Codes and Employees’ Internal Locus of Control, Social Aversion/Malevolence, and Ethical Judgment of Incivility: A Study of Smaller Organizations.Sean R. Valentine, Sheila K. Hanson & Gary M. Fleischman - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Workplace incivility is a current challenge in organizations, including smaller firms, as is the development of programs that enhance employees’ treatment of coworkers and ethical decision making. Ethics programs in particular might attenuate tendencies toward interpersonal misconduct, which can harm ethical reasoning. Consequently, this study evaluated the relationships among the presence of ethics codes and employees’ locus of control, social aversion/malevolence, and ethical judgments of incivility using information secured from a sample of businesspersons employed in smaller organizations. Results indicated that (...)
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  2.  12
    Villains, Victims, and Verisimilitudes: An Exploratory Study of Unethical Corporate Values, Bullying Experiences, Psychopathy, and Selling Professionals’ Ethical Reasoning.Sean Valentine, Gary Fleischman & Lynn Godkin - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (1):135-154.
    This study assesses the relationships among unethical corporate values, bullying experiences, psychopathy, and selling professionals’ ethical evaluations of bullying. Information was collected from national/regional samples of selling professionals. Results indicated that unethical values, bullying, and psychopathy were positively interrelated. Psychopathy and unethical values were negatively associated with moral intensity, while moral intensity was positively related to ethical issue importance. Psychopathy and unethical values were negatively related to issue importance, and issue importance and moral intensity were positively related to ethical judgment. (...)
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  3.  10
    Three Ethical Frames of Reference: Insights Into Millennials' Ethical Judgements and Intentions in the Workplace.Barbara Culiberg & Katarina Katja Mihelič - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (1):94-111.
    The paper investigates the ethical decisions of Millennials, who are not only part of an expanding cohort of the workforce, but also represent potential future managers with a growing influence on work practices and employment relationships. In the conceptual model, we propose that three ethical frames of reference, represented by perceived organisational ethics, perceived employee ethics and reflective moral attentiveness, antecede ethical judgements, which further influence the ethical intentions of Millennials. Using structural equation modelling, we test the model for three (...)
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  4.  4
    Ethics and Well-Being: The Paradoxical Implications of Individual Differences in Ethical Orientation.Robert A. Giacalone, Carole L. Jurkiewicz & Mark Promislo - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (3):491-506.
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  5.  12
    Ethics Training in the Indian IT Sector: Formal, Informal or Both?Pratima Verma, Siddharth Mohapatra & Jan Löwstedt - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (1):73-93.
  6.  12
    Mid-Management, Employee Engagement, and the Generation of Reliable Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility.Lynn Godkin - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):15-28.
    This paper explains how middle managers might enlist ethically engaged employees into the production of reliable, sustainable CSR. An accompanying model illustrates how those managers can encounter employee engagement in CSR and channel their enthusiasm effectively. It presents factors scaffolding organizational support for employee engagement and how they relate to the intensity of that engagement. It introduces the importance of employee voice and illustrates how associated signals might be captured.
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  7.  5
    Disgusted or Happy, It is Not so Bad: Emotional Mini-Max in Unethical Judgments.Karen Page Winterich, Andrea C. Morales & Vikas Mittal - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):343-360.
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  8.  7
    Toward an Ethical Theory of Organizing.Naveed Yazdani & Hasan S. Murad - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):399-417.
    Current organizations are underpinned by utilitarian ethics of Modernity. Pure economic motive driven organizations detach themselves from larger societal interest. Rising number of corporate scandals and intraorganizational income inequalities are breeding similar trends in society at large. Current organizations base their competitive advantage on resources and capabilities which boils down to economic supremacy at all cost whether it is named I/o or RBV of the firm. This theoretical article posits Ethics-based Trust as the main competency and capability for attaining sustained (...)
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  9.  21
    Ethical Context and Ethical Decision Making: Examination of an Alternative Statistical Approach for Identifying Variable Relationships.Sean Valentine, Seong-Hyun Nam, David Hollingworth & Callie Hall - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (3):509-526.
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  10.  18
    Individual and Organizational Antecedents of Professional Ethics of Public Relations Practitioners in Korea.Ji Yeon Han, Hyun Soon Park & Hyeonju Jeong - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):553-566.
    This study examines the effects of individual ethical values and organizational factors on the professional ethics of PR practitioners in Korea by considering a person–situation interactionist model. Individual ethical values are used as individual factors, and organizational factors consist of an organization’s reward and punishment for ethical/unethical behavior, the behavior of peers, and the ethical integrity of the chief ethics officer. The professional ethics of PR practitioners (the dependent variable) are classified into the following three dimensions: professional ethics for the (...)
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  11.  96
    The Personal Selling and Sales Management Ethics Research: Managerial Implications and Research Directions From a Comprehensive Review of the Empirical Literature. [REVIEW]Nicholas McClaren - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):101-125.
    Research into ethics in personal selling and sales management has increased substantially over the preceding decade by investigating complex dimensions of ethical decision-making in greater depth and with more analytical sophistication. This review of the recent conceptual and empirical literature provides insight into the extent and the direction of this knowledge, recommends managerial action, and discusses areas for future exploration. Future direction is also provided through research propositions. The type of sales practitioner investigated, the main variables examined, and the key (...)
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  12.  22
    Erratum To: Institutionalizing Ethical Innovation in Organizations: An Integrated Causal Model of Moral Innovation Decision Processes. [REVIEW]E. Günter Schumacher & David M. Wasieleski - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):181-182.
    This article answers several calls—coming as well from corporate governance practitioners as from corporate governance researchers—concerning the possibility of complying simultaneously with requirements of innovation and ethics. Revealing the long-term orientation as the variable which permits us to link the principal goal of organization, being “survival,” with innovation and ethic, the article devises a framework for incorporating ethics into a company’s processes and strategies for innovation. With the principal goal of organizations being “survival” in the long-term, it is assumed that (...)
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  13.  4
    Institutionalizing Ethical Innovation in Organizations: An Integrated Causal Model of Moral Innovation Decision Processes.E. Günter Schumacher & David M. Wasieleski - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):15-37.
  14.  15
    A Three-Country Study of Unethical Sales Behaviors.Ning Li & William H. Murphy - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):219-235.
    A major challenge in global sales research is helping managers understand sales ethics across countries. Addressing this challenge, our research investigates whether a few demographic variables and psychographic variables reduce unethical sales behaviors (USBs) in Canada, Mexico, and the USA. Further, using literatures associated with business ethics, national culture, and customer orientation advocacy, we hypothesize why sales managers should expect similarities and differences in USBs between countries. We tested hypotheses using a sales contest scenario and six USBs, examining survey responses (...)
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  15.  9
    The Impact of Ethical Tools on Aggressiveness in Financial Reporting.Brian M. Nagle, David M. Wasieleski & Stephen Rau - 2012 - Business and Society Review 117 (4):477-513.
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  16.  33
    Moral Intensity, Issue Importance, and Ethical Reasoning in Operations Situations.Sean Valentine & David Hollingworth - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):509 - 523.
    Previous work suggests that moral intensity and the perceived importance of an ethical issue can influence individual ethical decision making. However, prior research has not explored how the various dimensions of moral intensity might differentially affect PIE, or how moral intensity might function together with (or in the presence of) PIE to influence ethical decision making. In addition, prior work has also not adequately investigated how the operational context of an organization, which may embody conditions or practices that create barriers (...)
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  17.  40
    Toward Effective Codes: Testing the Relationship with Unethical Behavior. [REVIEW]Muel Kaptein - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):233 - 251.
    A business code of ethics is widely regarded as an important instrument to curb unethical behavior in the workplace. However, little is empirically known about the factors that determine the impact of a code on unethical behavior. Besides the existence of a code, this article studies five determining factors: the content of the code, the frequency of communication activities surrounding the code, the quality of the communication activities, and the embedment of the code in the organization by senior management as (...)
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  18.  89
    Improving the “Leader–Follower” Relationship: Top Manager or Supervisor? The Ethical Leadership Trickle-Down Effect on Follower Job Response.Pablo Ruiz, Carmen Ruiz & Ricardo Martínez - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):587-608.
    Since time immemorial, the phenomenon of leadership and its understanding has attracted the attention of the business world because of its important role in human groups. Nevertheless, for years efforts to understand this concept have only been centred on people in leadership roles, thus overlooking an important aspect in its understanding: the necessary moral dimension which is implicit in the relationship between leader and follower. As an illustrative example of the importance of considering good morality in leadership, an empirical study (...)
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  19.  46
    Consumer Perceptions of the Antecedents and Consequences of Corporate Social Responsibility.Andrea J. S. Stanaland, May O. Lwin & Patrick E. Murphy - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):47-55.
    Perceptions of a firm’s stance on corporate social responsibility (CSR) are influenced by its corporate marketing efforts including branding, reputation building, and communications. The current research examines CSR from the consumer’s perspective, focusing on antecedents and consequences of perceived CSR. The findings strongly support the fact that particular cues, namely perceived financial performance and perceived quality of ethics statements, influence perceived CSR which in turn impacts perceptions of corporate reputation, consumer trust, and loyalty. Both consumer trust and loyalty were also (...)
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  20.  42
    Corporate Ethical Values, Group Creativity, Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention: The Impact of Work Context on Work Response. [REVIEW]Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin, Gary M. Fleischman & Roland Kidwell - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):353 - 372.
    A corporate culture strengthened by ethical values and other positive business practices likely yields more favorable employee work responses. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which perceived corporate ethical values work in concert with group creativity to influence both job satisfaction and turnover intention. Using a self-report questionnaire, information was collected from 781 healthcare and administrative employees working at a multi-campus education-based healthcare organization. Additional survey data was collected from a comparative convenience sample of (...)
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  21.  44
    Ethics Statements of Public Relations Firms: What Do They Say?Eyun-Jung Ki & Soo-Yeon Kim - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (2):223-236.
    This study was designed to examine the prevalence of a code of ethics and to analyze its content among public relations agencies in the United States. Of the 1,562 public relations agencies reviewed, 605 (38.7%) provided an ethical statement. Among the ethical statements provided by these public relations agencies, ‹respect to clients,’ ‹service,’ ‹strategic,’ and ‹results’ were the values most frequently emphasized. On the other hand, ‹balance,’ ‹fairness,’ ‹honor,’ ‹social responsibility,’ and ‹independence’ were the least frequently mentioned in the ethical (...)
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  22.  18
    The Effects of Ethical Codes on Ethical Perceptions of Actions Toward Stakeholders.Joseph A. McKinney, Tisha L. Emerson & Mitchell J. Neubert - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):505 - 516.
    As a result of numerous, highly publicized, ethical breaches, firms and their agents are under ongoing scrutiny. In an attempt to improve both their image and their ethical performance, some firms have adopted ethical codes of conduct. Past research investigating the effects of ethical codes of conduct on behavior and ethical attitudes has yielded mixed results. In this study, we again take up the question of the effect of ethical codes on ethical attitudes and find strong evidence to suggest that (...)
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  23.  35
    Constructing a Code of Ethics: An Experiential Case of a National Professional Organization. [REVIEW]Carla Masciocchi Messikomer & Carol Cabrey Cirka - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):55 - 71.
    This paper documents the development and implementation of an ethically valid code of ethics in a newly formed national professional organization. It describes the experience and challenges faced by the National Association of Senior Move Managers (NASMM) and its leaders as they worked to establish ethics as an organizing framework early in its evolution. Designed by the investigators and supported by the NASMM Board, the process took place over a 2 year period and more than 130 people participated. It provides (...)
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  24.  40
    Role Conflict, Mindfulness, and Organizational Ethics in an Education-Based Healthcare Institution.Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin & Philip E. Varca - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (3):455 - 469.
    Role conflict occurs when a job possesses inconsistent expectations incongruent with individual beliefs, a situation that precipitates considerable frustration and other negative work outcomes. Increasing interest in processes that reduce role conflict is, therefore, witnessed. With the help of information collected from a large sample of individuals employed at an education-based healthcare institution, this study identified several factors that might decrease role conflict, namely mindfulness and organizational ethics. In particular, the results indicated that mindfulness was associated with decreased role conflict, (...)
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  25.  23
    Managers' Attitudes Toward Codes of Ethics: Are There Gender Differences?Nabil Ibrahim, John Angelidis & Igor M. Tomic - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):343 - 353.
    This article extends previous research by investigating the basis for attitudes toward codes of ethics. Specifically, its purposes are threefold. First, to examine business managers' attitudes toward codes of ethics. Second, to ascertain whether gender differences do exist with respect to these attitudes. Third, to provide a benchmark for future studies of attitudes toward codes of ethics. A survey of 286 managers revealed significant differences between the female and male managers with respect to six of the eight variables studied.
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  26.  38
    Corporate Governance and Codes of Ethics.Luis Rodriguez-Dominguez, Isabel Gallego-Alvarez & Isabel Maria Garcia-Sanchez - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):187-202.
    As a result of recent corporate scandals, several rules have focused on the role played by Boards of Directors on the planning and monitoring of corporate codes of ethics. In theory, outside directors are in a better position than insiders to protect and further the interests of all stakeholders because of their experience and their sense of moral and legal obligations. Female directors also tend to be more sensitive to ethics according to several past studies which explain this affirmation by (...)
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  27.  68
    Principles and Influence in Codes of Ethics: A Centering Resonance Analysis Comparing Pre- and Post-Sarbanes-Oxley Codes of Ethics.Heather E. Canary & Marianne M. Jennings - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):263-278.
    This study examines the similarities and differences in pre- and post-Sarbanes-Oxley corporate ethics codes and codes of conduct using the framework of structuration theory. Following the passage of the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) legislation in 2002 in the United States, publicly traded companies there undertook development and revision of their codes of ethics in response to new regulatory requirements as well as incentives under the U.S. Corporate Sentencing Guidelines, which were also revised as part of the SOX mandates. Questions that remain are (...)
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  28. The Effectiveness of Business Codes: A Critical Examination of Existing Studies and the Development of an Integrated Research Model. [REVIEW]Muel Kaptein & Mark S. Schwartz - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):111 - 127.
    Business codes are a widely used management instrument. Research into the effectiveness of business codes has, however, produced conflicting results. The main reasons for the divergent findings are: varying definitions of key terms; deficiencies in the empirical data and methodologies used; and a lack of theory. In this paper, we propose an integrated research model and suggest directions for future research.
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  29.  29
    Complementary Resources and Capabilities for an Ethical and Environmental Management: A Qual/Quan Study.María Dolores López-Gamero, Enrique Claver-Cortés & José Francisco Molina-Azorín - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):701-732.
    Managers’ commitment to contribute to sustainable development holds the key to their long-term business success and may be a source of competitive advantage. The managerial perception of business ethics is influenced by the level of moral development and personal characteristics of managers. These perceptions are also shaped by forces existing in the environment of the firm, including available resources, societal expectations, sector, and regulations. The resource-based perspective can thus contribute to the analysis of ethical issues offering important insights on how (...)
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  30.  89
    Ethics Programs, Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Job Satisfaction.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):159 - 172.
    Companies offer ethics codes and training to increase employees’ ethical conduct. These programs can also enhance individual work attitudes because ethical organizations are typically valued. Socially responsible companies are likely viewed as ethical organizations and should therefore prompt similar employee job responses. Using survey information collected from 313 business professionals, this exploratory study proposed that perceived corporate social responsibility would mediate the positive relationships between ethics codes/training and job satisfaction. Results indicated that corporate social responsibility fully or partially mediated the (...)
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  31.  4
    Ethics Programs, Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Job Satisfaction.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):159-172.
    Companies offer ethics codes and training to increase employees' ethical conduct. These programs can also enhance individual work attitudes because ethical organizations are typically valued. Socially responsible companies are likely viewed as ethical organizations and should therefore prompt similar employee job responses. Using survey information collected from 313 business professionals, this exploratory study proposed that perceived corporate social responsibility would mediate the positive relationships between ethics codes/training and job satisfaction. Results indicated that corporate social responsibility fully or partially mediated the (...)
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  32. Professional Ethical Standards, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):657-666.
    This study explored several proposed relationships among professional ethical standards, corporate social responsibility, and the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility. Data were collected from 313 business managers registered with a large professional research association with a mailed self-report questionnaire. Mediated regression analysis indicated that perceptions of corporate social responsibility partially mediated the positive relationship between perceived professional ethical standards and the believed importance of ethics and social responsibility. Perceptions of corporate social responsibility also fully mediated the negative relationship (...)
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  33.  46
    An Inquiry Into the Study of Corporate Codes of Ethics.Sven Helin & Johan Sandström - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (3):253-271.
    This paper takes its point of departure in an article by Stevens [Stevens, B.: 1994, Journal of Business Ethics 54, 163–171], in which she identified a lack of knowledge regarding how corporate codes of ethics are communicated and affect behavior in organizations. Taking heed of this suggested gap, we review studies on corporate codes of ethics with an empirical content, published since 1994. The conclusion of the review is that we still lack knowledge on how codes work, how they are (...)
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  34.  28
    An Ethical Decision-Making Framework for Competitor Intelligence Gathering.Terri L. Rittenburg, Sean R. Valentine & James B. Faircloth - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):235-245.
    Competitor intelligence gathering involves the aggregation of competitive information to facilitate strategic development and a competitive advantage. Unfortunately, companies are sometimes willing to carry out questionable gathering practices to collect such information. An ethical decision making framework for competitor intelligence gathering is presented in this paper that outlines the impact of several strengthening and weakening factors on individual ethical reasoning. Dialogue is provided about the management of intelligence gathering from various viewpoints, and the implications of these managerial suggestions are discussed.
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  35.  38
    The Ethical Decision Making of Men and Women Executives in International Business Situations.Sean R. Valentine & Terri L. Rittenburg - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 71 (2):125 - 134.
    While a number of studies have examined the impact of gender/sex on ethical decision-making, the findings of this body of research do not provide consistent answers. Furthermore, very few of these studies have incorporated cross-cultural samples. Consequently, this study of 222 American and Spanish business executives explored sex differences in ethical judgments and intentions to act ethically. While no significant differences between males and females were found with respect to ethical judgments, females exhibited higher intentions to act more ethically than (...)
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  36.  11
    Perceived Ethical Values and Small Business Problems in Poland.Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin, Edward Cyrson & Gary Fleischman - 2006 - Business Ethics 15 (1):76–85.
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  37.  2
    Perceived Ethical Values and Small Business Problems in Poland.Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin, Edward Cyrson & Gary Fleischman - 2006 - Business Ethics: A European Review 15 (1):76-85.
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    Nine to Five: Skepticism of Women's Employment and Ethical Reasoning. [REVIEW]Sean Valentine & Karen Page - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (1):53 - 61.
    Previous work suggests that gender attitudes are associated with different individual and organizational factors. At the same time, ethics research suggests that many of these same variables can influence ethical reasoning in companies. In this study, we sought to combine these streams of research to investigate whether individual skepticism of women’s employment is related to ethical reasoning in a gender-based ethical situation. The results of the hierarchical regression analysis indicated that skepticism of women’s employment was negatively related to the recognition (...)
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  39.  3
    Nine to Five: Skepticism of Women’s Employment and Ethical Reasoning.Sean Valentine & Karen Page - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (1):53-61.
    Previous work suggests that gender attitudes are associated with different individual and organizational factors. At the same time, ethics research suggests that many of these same variables can influence ethical reasoning in companies. In this study, we sought to combine these streams of research to investigate whether individual skepticism of women's employment is related to ethical reasoning in a gender-based ethical situation. The results of the hierarchical regression analysis indicated that skepticism of women's employment was negatively related to the recognition (...)
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  40.  16
    The Role of Idealism and Relativism as Dispositional Characteristics in the Socially Responsible Decision-Making Process.Haesun Park - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (1):81-98.
    This study investigated how decision-makers differ in processing their organizational environment, depending on the levels of their idealism and relativism. Focusing on socially responsible buying/sourcing issues, responses from buying/sourcing professionals from U.S. apparel and shoe companies were analyzed, using a series of regression analyses. The results generally supported the proposition that the degrees of idealism and relativism determine involvement levels that, in turn, result in varying levels of reactions to the organizational environment and corresponding amounts of information processing. Highly idealistic (...)
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  41.  16
    Codes of Ethics, Orientation Programs, and the Perceived Importance of Employee Incorruptibility.Sean Valentine & Anthony Johnson - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (1):45-53.
    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which the review of corporate ethics codes is associated with individuals’ perceptions of the importance of virtue ethics, or more specifically, employee incorruptibility. A convenience sample of individuals working for a university or one of several business organizations located in the Mountain West region of the United States was compiled with a self-report questionnaire. A usable sample of 143 persons representing both the public and private industries was secured for (...)
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  42.  33
    The Impact of Personal and Organizational Moral Philosophies on Marketing Exchange Relationships: A Simulation Using the Prisoner's Dilemma Game. [REVIEW]Alison Watkins & Ronald Paul Hill - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):253 - 265.
    The purpose of this research is to examine the impact of individual and firm moral philosophies on marketing exchange relationships. Personal moral philosophies range from the extreme forms of true altruists and true egoists, along with three hybrids that represent middle ground (i.e., realistic altruists, tit-for-tats, and realistic egoists). Organizational postures are defined as Ethical Paradigm, Unethical Paradigm, and Neutral Paradigm, which result in changes to personal moral philosophies and company and industry performance. The study context is a simulation of (...)
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  43.  2
    The Impact of Personal and Organizational Moral Philosophies on Marketing Exchange Relationships: A Simulation Using the Prisoner’s Dilemma Game.Alison Watkins & Ronald Paul Hill - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):253-265.
    The purpose of this research is to examine the impact of individual and firm moral philosophies on marketing exchange relationships. Personal moral philosophies range from the extreme forms of true altruists and true egoists, along with three hybrids that represent middle ground. Organizational postures are defined as Ethical Paradigm, Unethical Paradigm, and Neutral Paradigm, which result in changes to personal moral philosophies and company and industry performance. The study context is a simulation of an exchange environment using a variation of (...)
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  44.  11
    The Ethics of the US Business Executive: A Study of Perceptions.B. Stevens - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):163-171.
    Gallup Polls have reported on the perceived ethics of various professions in the US since 1976. Clergymen and pharmacists were consistently identified as two of the most ethical professionals in the 1980''s and 1990''s. Business executives have not fared well in these polls and have not been rated among the top ten most ethical professions in any of the years the poll was taken. Ethical codes have not done much to belay the perception that the US business executive is not (...)
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  45.  52
    Ethics Training and Businesspersons' Perceptions of Organizational Ethics.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 52 (4):381 - 390.
    Ethics training is commonly cited as a primary method for increasing employees ethical decision making and conduct. However, little is known about how the presence of ethics training can enhance other components of an organization's ethical environment such as employees perception of company ethical values. Using a national sample of 313 business professionals employed in the United States, the relationship between ethics training and perceived organizational ethics was explored. The results of the analysis provide significant statistical support for the notion (...)
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  46.  11
    A Cross-Cultural Study of the Antecedents of the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility.Scott J. Vitell & Joseph G. P. Paolillo - 2004 - Business Ethics 13 (2-3):185-199.
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  47.  4
    A Cross-Cultural Study of the Antecedents of the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility.Scott J. Vitell & Joseph G. P. Paolillo - 2004 - Business Ethics: A European Review 13 (2-3):185-199.
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