Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Imaginary Intrasexual Competition: Advertisements Featuring Provocative Female Models Trigger Women to Engage in Indirect Aggression.Sylvie Borau & Jean-François Bonnefon - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (1):45-63.
    Recent research suggests that women react to idealized female models in advertising as they would react to real-life sexual rivals. Across four studies, we investigate the negative consequences of this imaginary competition on consumers’ mate-guarding jealousy, indirect aggression, and drive for thinness. A meta-analysis of studies 1–3 shows that women exposed to an idealized model report more mate-guarding jealousy and show increased indirect aggression, but do not report a higher desire for thinness. Study 4 replicates these findings and reveals that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Achieving Top Performance While Building Collegiality in Sales: It All Starts with Ethics.Omar S. Itani, Fernando Jaramillo & Larry Chonko - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (2):417-438.
    While previous literature provides evidence of the positive relationship between ethical climate and job satisfaction, the possible mechanisms of this relationship are still underexplored. This study aims to enhance scholars’ and practitioners’ understanding of the ethical climate–job satisfaction relationship by identifying and testing two of the possible mechanisms. More specifically, this study fills an existing research gap by examining social and interpersonal mechanisms, referred to in this study as workplace isolation of colleagues and salesperson’s teamwork, of the ethical climate–job satisfaction (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Incivility’s Relationship with Workplace Outcomes: Enactment as a Boundary Condition in Two Samples.Jeremy D. Mackey, John D. Bishoff, Shanna R. Daniels, Wayne A. Hochwarter & Gerald R. Ferris - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):513-528.
    The current two-sample investigation explores the role of enactment as a boundary condition in the relationship between experienced incivility and workplace outcomes. We integrate the tenets of the transactional model of stress and sensemaking theory to explain why enactment is a psychological sensemaking capability that can neutralize the adverse effects of experienced incivility on workplace outcomes. The results across two samples of data supported the study hypotheses by demonstrating that experienced incivility had stronger adverse effects on employees’ job satisfaction, OCBs, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Presence of Ethics Codes and Employees’ Internal Locus of Control, Social Aversion/Malevolence, and Ethical Judgment of Incivility: A Study of Smaller Organizations.Sean R. Valentine, Sheila K. Hanson & Gary M. Fleischman - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Workplace incivility is a current challenge in organizations, including smaller firms, as is the development of programs that enhance employees’ treatment of coworkers and ethical decision making. Ethics programs in particular might attenuate tendencies toward interpersonal misconduct, which can harm ethical reasoning. Consequently, this study evaluated the relationships among the presence of ethics codes and employees’ locus of control, social aversion/malevolence, and ethical judgments of incivility using information secured from a sample of businesspersons employed in smaller organizations. Results indicated that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Supervisor Abuse Effects on Subordinate Turnover Intentions and Subsequent Interpersonal Aggression: The Role of Power-Distance Orientation and Perceived Human Resource Support Climate.Orlando C. Richard, O. Dorian Boncoeur, Hao Chen & David L. Ford - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Despite mounting evidence that abusive supervision triggers interpersonal aggression, much remains unknown regarding the underlying causal mechanisms within this relationship. We explore the role of turnover intentions as a mediator in the relationship between abusive supervision and subsequent supervisor-rated interpersonal aggression. We use a sample of 324 supervisor–subordinate dyads from nine organizations and find support for this mediation effect. Furthermore, we find that power-distance orientation and perceived human resource support climate, as important boundary conditions, independently interact with abusive supervision to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark