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  1. Registering Ideology in the Creation of Social Entrepreneurs: Intermediary Organizations, ‘Ideal Subject’ and the Promise of Enjoyment.Pascal Dey & Othmar Lehner - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (4):753-767.
    Research on social entrepreneurship has taken an increasing interest in issues pertaining to ideology. In contrast to existing research which tends to couch ‘ideology’ in pejorative terms, this paper conceives ideology as a key mechanism for rendering social entrepreneurship an object with which people can identify. Specifically, drawing on qualitative research of arguably one of the most prolific social entrepreneurship intermediaries, the global Impact Hub network, we investigate how social entrepreneurship is narrated as an ‘ideal subject,’ which signals toward others (...)
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  • A Positive Theory of Social Entrepreneurship.Filipe M. Santos - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):335-351.
    I propose a theory aimed at advancing scholarly research in social entrepreneurship. By highlighting the key trade-off between value creation and value capture and explaining when situations of simultaneous market and government failure may arise, I suggest that social entrepreneurship is the pursuit of sustainable solutions to neglected problems with positive externalities. I further discuss the situations in which problems with externalities are likely to be neglected and derive the central goal and logic of action of social entrepreneurs, in contrast (...)
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  • Collective Social Entrepreneurship: Collaboratively Shaping Social Good. [REVIEW]A. Wren Montgomery, Peter A. Dacin & M. Tina Dacin - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):375-388.
    In this paper, we move beyond the typical focus on the role of individuals in leading social change to examine "collective social entrepreneurship", the role multiple actors collaboratively play to address social problems, create new institutions, and dismantle outdated institutional arrangements. Specifically, we examine collective social entrepreneurship across a diverse range of collaborative activities including movements, alliances and markets for social good. We identify resource utilization approaches and three associated sets of activities that illustrate the work of collective social entrepreneurs—framing, (...)
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  • Social Entrepreneurship in Theory and Practice—An Introduction.Nicola M. Pless - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):317-320.
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  • Identifying and Assessing Managerial Value Orientations: A Cross-Generational Replication Study of Key Organizational Decision-Makers’ Values.James Weber - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (3):493-504.
    This research investigates managerial value orientations using the Rokeach Value Survey to assess the importance managers assign to various values. While prior work and select organizational theory posit that MVO will not change over time, the data are analyzed to determine if the MVO of mid- to upper-level managers, the key decision-makers in most organizations, has remained generally the same or has changed from one generation to another. The results show that the MVO of managers from 1990 is significantly different (...)
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  • Social Entrepreneurship in Non-Munificent Institutional Environments and Implications for Institutional Work: Insights From China.Babita Bhatt, Israr Qureshi & Suhaib Riaz - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (3):605-630.
    We investigate the research question: Why are there very few social enterprises in China? Our findings unpack four types of institutional challenges to social entrepreneurship, as perceived by social entrepreneurs: norms of a strong role for government; misunderstood or unknown role for social enterprises; non-supportive rules and regulations; and lack of socio-cultural values and beliefs in support of social goals. We contribute to the literature on social enterprises by showing how an institutional environment may be “non-munificent,” i.e., non-supportive for the (...)
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  • Discourses About Righting the Business ← → Society Relationship.Jeremy P. Fyke, Sarah Bonewits Feldner & Steven K. May - 2016 - Business and Society Review 121 (2):217-245.
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  • Managing Relational Conflict in Korean Social Enterprises: The Role of Participatory HRM Practices, Diversity Climate, and Perceived Social Impact.Jeong Won Lee, Long Zhang, Matt Dallas & Hyun Chin - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (1):19-35.
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  • A Fair Trade-Off? Paradoxes in the Governance of Fair-Trade Social Enterprises.Chris Mason & Bob Doherty - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):451-469.
    This paper explores how fair trade social enterprises manage paradoxes in stakeholder-oriented governance models. We use narrative accounts from board members, at governance events and board documents to report an exploratory study of paradoxes in three FTSEs which are partly farmer-owned. Having synthesized the key social enterprise governance literature and framed it alongside the broader paradox theory, we used narratives to explore how tensions are articulated, how they can be applied within an adapted paradox framework, and how governance actors seek (...)
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  • Spiritually Informed Not-for-Profit Performance Measurement.Edward N. Gamble & Haley A. Beer - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (3):451-468.
    Performance measurement has far-reaching implications for not-for-profit organizations because it serves to legitimize, attract resources, and preserve expectations of stakeholders. However, the existing theory and practice of not-for-profit performance measurement have fallen short, due in part, to an overuse of profit-oriented philosophies. Therefore, we examine not-for-profit performance measurement by utilizing Marques’ “five spiritual practices of Buddhism.” Marques’ spiritual practices—a pro-scientific philosophy, greater personal responsibility, healthy detachment, collaboration, and embracing a wholesome view—are the foundation of our research design. Responses from senior (...)
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