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  1. A Phase-Wise Development Approach to Business Excellence: Towards an Innovative, Stakeholder-Oriented Assessment Tool for Organizational Excellence and CSR.Marcel Van Marrewijk, Iris Wuisman, Wim De Cleyn, Joanna Timmers, Virgilio Panapanaan & Lassi Linnanen - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (2):83-98.
    The European Corporate Sustainability Framework (ECSF) is, among other concepts, based on a phase-wise development approach as described by Clare Graves' Levels of Existence Theory. As much as corporate sustainability has a sequence of adequate interpretations, aligned with each development level, also the notion of business excellence can be defined at multiple levels, as this paper demonstrates. Furthermore, the authors analyze the current EFQM Excellence Model for particular biases towards various development levels and suggest a new and innovative two-step approach (...)
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  • The Influence of Corporate Psychopaths on Corporate Social Responsibility and Organizational Commitment to Employees.Clive R. Boddy, Richard K. Ladyshewsky & Peter Galvin - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):1-19.
    This study investigated whether employee perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) were associated with the presence of Corporate Psychopaths in corporations. The article states that, as psychopaths are 1% of the population, it is logical to assume that every large corporation has psychopaths working within it. To differentiate these people from the common perception of psychopaths as being criminals, they have been called "Corporate Psychopaths" in this research. The article presents quantitative empirical research into the influence of Corporate Psychopaths on (...)
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  • Does Context Matter for Sustainability Disclosure? Institutional Factors in Southeast Asia.Mi Tran & Eshani Beddewela - 2020 - Business Ethics: A European Review 29 (2):282-302.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  • In Search of the Dominant Rationale in Sustainability Management: Legitimacy- or Profit-Seeking?Stefan Schaltegger & Jacob Hörisch - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (2):259-276.
    The academic debate why and how companies are dealing with sustainability is dominated by two main arguments—the profit-seeking and the legitimacy-seeking view. While the first argues that companies establish sustainability management measures if this helps to increase their economic success, others emphasize that companies predominantly react on societal pressure dealing with sustainability to secure legitimacy. Whereas both lines of argument have gained a lot of attention in academia, little is known about their relative importance in shaping corporate practice. This papers (...)
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  • The Action Logics of Environmental Leadership: A Developmental Perspective.Olivier Boiral, Mario Cayer & Charles M. Baron - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):479-499.
    This article examines how the action logics associated with the stages of consciousness development of organizational leaders can influence the meaning, which these leaders give to corporate greening and their capacity to consider the specific complexities, values, and demands of environmental issues. The article explores how the seven principal action logics identified by Rooke and Torbert (2005, Harvard Business Review 83 (4), 66–76; Opportunist, Diplomat, Expert, Achiever, Individualist, Strategist and Alchemist) can affect environmental leadership. An examination of the strengths and (...)
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  • Multinational Enterprise Strategies for Addressing Sustainability: The Need for Consolidation.Roger Leonard Burritt, Katherine Leanne Christ, Hussain Gulzar Rammal & Stefan Schaltegger - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (2):389-410.
    This paper examines the growing number of publications on multinational enterprise management of sustainability issues. Based on an integrative literature review and thematic analysis, the paper analyses and synthesises the current state of knowledge about main issues arising. Key issues identified include the following: choice of sustainability strategies; management of the views of headquarters towards sustainability; local cultural sustainability perspectives in developed and developing host countries; MNEs with home in developing/emerging countries; and resource availability for implementing sustainability initiatives. Findings indicate (...)
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  • The Social Dimension of Organizations: Recent Experiences with Great Place to Work® Assessment Practices. [REVIEW]Marcel van Marrewijk - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (2):135-146.
    This paper elaborates on conceptual, empirical and practical arguments why corporations need to focus on their social dimensions, in order to further enhance organizational performance. The paper starts with an introduction on the general trend towards inclusiveness and connectedness. It then elaborates on the phase-wise development of cultures and organizational structures. Managing corporate improvement by building cultures of trust is the central focus of this contribution. By showing the cultural dimensions of Great Places to Work and their workplace practices, worthwhile (...)
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  • Perceived Mortality and Perceived Morality: Perceptions of Value-Orientation Are More Likely When a Decision Is Preceded by a Mortality Reminder.Mads Nordmo & Elisabeth Norman - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • The Co-Evolution of Leaders’ Cognitive Complexity and Corporate Sustainability: The Case of the CEO of Puma.Tobias Hahn, Patricia Gabaldón & Stefan Gröschl - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (3):741-762.
    In this longitudinal study, we explore the co-evolution of the cognitive complexity of the CEO of Puma, Jochen Zeitz, and his view and initiatives on sustainability. Our purpose was to explore how the changes in a leader’s mindset relate to his/her views and actions on sustainability. In contrast to previous studies, we adopt an in-depth longitudinal case study approach to capture the role of leaders’ cognitive complexity in the context of corporate sustainability. By understanding the cognitive development of Zeitz as (...)
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  • The Role of 'High Potentials' in Integrating and Implementing Corporate Social Responsibility.Adam Lindgreen, Valérie Swaen, David Harness & Marieke Hoffmann - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):73-91.
    The Samenleving and Bedrijf (S&B) network of Dutch organizations seeks to embed corporate social responsibility (CSR) within business practices but faces challenges with regard to how to do so across various organizational practices, processes, and policies. The integration of CSR demands cultural change driven by senior management and other change agents, who push CSR principles throughout the organization. This study examines the change processes that S&B member organizations have initiated, with a particular focus on the role of high potentials—those persons (...)
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  • Institutional Environment, Managerial Attitudes and Environmental Sustainability Orientation of Small Firms.Banjo Roxas & Alan Coetzer - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (4):461-476.
    This study examines the direct impact of three dimensions of the institutional environment on managerial attitudes toward the natural environment and the direct influence of the latter on the environmental sustainability orientation (ESO) of small firms. We contend that when the institutional environment is perceived by owner–managers as supportive of sound natural environment management practices, they are more likely to develop a positive attitude toward natural environment issues and concerns. Such owner–manager attitudes are likely to lead to a positive and (...)
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  • Organizing Corporate Social Responsibility in Small and Large Firms: Size Matters. [REVIEW]Dorothée Baumann-Pauly, Christopher Wickert, Laura J. Spence & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):693-705.
    Based on the findings of a qualitative empirical study of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Swiss MNCs and SMEs, we suggest that smaller firms are not necessarily less advanced in organizing CSR than large firms. Results according to theoretically derived assessment frameworks illustrate the actual implementation status of CSR in organizational practices. We propose that small firms possess several organizational characteristics that are favorable for promoting the internal implementation of CSR-related practices in core business functions, but constrain external communication and (...)
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  • Responsible Management, Incentive Systems, and Productivity.Ivan Hilliard - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):365-377.
    A disconnect remains between theories about responsible management and application in real-life organizations. Part of the reason is due to the complexity and holistic nature of the field, and the fact that many of the benefits of aligning business objectives with changing societal conditions are of an intangible nature. Human resource management is an increasingly important part of the field with benefits including talent retention, higher levels of motivation, and improvements in organizational cohesion. This paper sets out an experiment run (...)
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  • Between Profit-Seeking and Prosociality: Corporate Social Responsibility as Derridean Supplement.Cameron Sabadoz - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):77-91.
    This article revolves around the debate surrounding the lack of a coherent definition for corporate social responsibility (CSR). I make use of Jacques Derrida’s theorizing on contested meaning to argue that CSR’s ambiguity is actually necessary in light of its functional role as a “supplement” to corporate profit-seeking. As a discourse that refuses to conclusively resolve the tension between profit-seeking and prosociality, CSR expresses an important critical perspective which demands that firms act responsibly, while retaining the overall corporate frame of (...)
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  • Sustainable Development and Corporate Environmental Responsibility: Evidence From Chinese Corporations. [REVIEW]Mao He & Juan Chen - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (4):323-339.
    China is currently experiencing rapid economic growth. The price of this, however, is environment pollution. Many Chinese corporations are lacking in corporate environmental responsibility (CER). Therefore, this study employs data from Chinese and multinational corporations to identify why Chinese corporations seldom engage in CER by investigating their motivations and stakeholders. The results show that the most important reason why Chinese corporations do not engage in CER is the fact that their competitive strategy of cost cutting makes them limited in resources, (...)
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  • Management Information System – a Tool for Corporate Sustainability.Andrea Caldelli & Marisa Luisa Parmigiani - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (2):159 - 171.
    This paper represents the attempt to define a methodology that can evaluate the degree to which companies'' information systems correspond to needs determined by the objectives of sustainability the firm imposes on itself. The result is the creation of a general model which define the correct approach to evaluating information systems – a model which should be adapted to the specificity of each single company which intends to adopt it. In the chart indicated, we obviously have not considered activities connected (...)
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  • Ecology-Driven Real Options: An Investment Framework for Incorporating Uncertainties in the Context of the Natural Environment.Timo Busch & Volker H. Hoffmann - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):295-310.
    The role of uncertainty within an organization’s environment features prominently in the business ethics and management literature, but how corporate investment decisions should proceed in the face of uncertainties relating to the natural environment is less discussed. From the perspective of ecological economics, the salience of ecology-induced issues challenges management to address new types of uncertainties. These pertain to constraints within the natural environment as well as to institutional action aimed at conserving the natural environment. We derive six areas of (...)
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  • Multinational Oil Companies and the Adoption of Sustainable Development: A Resource-Based and Institutional Theory Interpretation of Adoption Heterogeneity.Luis Fernando Escobar & Harrie Vredenburg - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):39-65.
    Sustainable development is often framed as a social issue to which corporations should pay attention because it offers both opportunities and challenges. Through the use of institutional theory and the resource-based view of the firm, we shed some light on why, more than 20 years after sustainable development was first introduced, we see neither the adoption of this business model as dominant nor its converse, that is the total abandonment of the model as unworkable and unprofitable. We focus on multinational (...)
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  • The Hidden Hand of Cultural Governance: The Transformation Process of Humanitas, a Community-Driven Organization Providing, Cure, Care, Housing and Well-Being to Elderly People. [REVIEW]Marcel van Marrewijk & Hans M. Becker - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (2):205-214.
    This article gives a practice-based and theoretical overview of the transformation from a traditional hierarchical organization in the care and cure sector towards a so-called Community-driven organization providing human happiness to 6000 elderly people. The actual case study is intertwined with conceptual information for better understanding of the innovative transition which took place at Humanitas. The case description includes its initial situation, its new core values, mission and objectives and shows the sequence of emerging policies and interventions that resulted in (...)
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  • The Influence of Cooperative Relations of Small Businesses on Environmental Protection Intensity.Sonia Benito-Hernández, Manuel Platero-Jaime & Pablo Esteban-Sánchez - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (4):416-439.
    This study examines the relationship between cooperative business relations in small businesses and environmental protection, one of the most important policies of social responsibility in manufacturing. We reviewed the literature and carried out an empirical study of 930 small manufacturing firms in Spain. Results indicate that small businesses that maintain and improve their cooperative relations through business networking with universities, competitors, suppliers and customers spend more on environmental protection. The managerial, practical, research and policy implications of the obtained research findings (...)
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  • CSR as Strategic and Organizational Change at “Groupe La Poste”.Marc Ingham & Christelle Havard - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):563-589.
    More and more companies are developing corporate social responsibility -related programs which imply strategic and organizational changes. This article focuses on a public utility organization, the Groupe La Poste, in which CSR issues and practices are linked to its specific mission as a public service, thus defining and explicitly structuring its CSR programs. We explore the following research questions: Why did the Groupe La Poste formulate explicitly its CSR program? What is the content of this program and how it is (...)
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  • Business Group Affiliation and Corporate Sustainability Strategies of Firms: An Investigation of Firms in India.Sougata Ray & Bikramjit Ray Chaudhuri - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (4):955-976.
    In spite of an overwhelming importance of business groups in the economic development of many countries, systematic inquiry on how the BGs and their affiliated firms approach and contribute to shared value creation and sustainable development is rare. In this paper we address this research gap by investigating two related questions—do BG-affiliated firms differ from non-BG firms in their corporate sustainability strategy and how does BG affiliation influence the relationship between stock of fungible resources and CSS of firms? Drawing from (...)
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  • Reflexivity in Sustainability Accounting and Management: Transcending the Economic Focus of Corporate Sustainability.Anselm Schneider - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (3):525-536.
    In order to enable firms to successfully deal with issues of corporate sustainability, the firms' stakeholders would need to participate in sustainability accounting and management. In practice, however, participative sustainability accounting and management are often unfeasible. The resulting consequence is the risk of misbalancing single aspects of sustainability. The purpose of this article is to show that reflexivity in sustainability accounting and management, that is, an ongoing reflection on the relationship between the goals of corporate sustainability and the overarching objective (...)
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  • The Impact of National Culture on Corporate Social Responsibility: Evidence From Cross-Regional Comparison.Namporn Thanetsunthorn - 2015 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 4 (1):35-56.
    The objective of this paper is to empirically examine the impact of national culture on firm’s corporate social responsibility across geographical regions. Empirical tests are based on CSR performance of 3055 corporations from 28 countries located in Eastern Asia and Europe. The findings suggest that the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions have significant impacts on CSR performance, both positively and negatively depending on a given dimension of CSR. In addition, corporations located in European countries tend to effectively outperform those in Eastern Asian (...)
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  • Business Cases and Corporate Engagement with Sustainability: Differentiating Ethical Motivations.Stefan Schaltegger & Roger Burritt - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (2):241-259.
    This paper explores links between different ethical motivations and kinds of corporate social responsibility activities to distinguish between different types of business cases with regard to sustainability. The design of CSR and corporate sustainability can be based on different ethical foundations and motivations. This paper draws on the framework of Roberts which distinguishes four different ethical management versions of CSR. The first two ethical motivations are driven either by a reactionary concern for the short-term financial interests of the business, or (...)
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  • Tightrope Walking: Navigating Competition in Multi-Company Cross-Sector Social Partnerships.Lea Stadtler - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (2):329-345.
    Many challenges to economic and social well-being require close collaboration between business, government, and civil-society actors. In this context, the involvement of multiple companies rather than a single company may enhance such cross-sector social partnerships’ outcomes. However, extant literature cautions about the tensions arising from companies’ competitive interests and the detrimental effects on the CSSP’s social outcome. Similarly, studies analyzing simultaneous collaboration and competition suggest shielding off competitive elements from the collaboration. Based on insights into two multi-company CSSPs, we conversely (...)
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  • Corporate Sustainability: A View From the Top.Arménio Rego, Miguel Pina E. Cunha & Daniel Polónia - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):133-157.
    Through a qualitative approach, we explore the perspective of 72 CEOs of companies operating in Portugal about the definition of corporate sustainability and its facilitators, and obtain four main findings. First, most CEOs equate CS with the company’s continuity/viability. Second, the relevance ascribed to different stakeholders differs considerably: while more than 50 % of CEOs cited shareholders/profits, and more than 40 % mentioned the natural environment and employees, very few mentioned customers, society, suppliers, the State, or competitors. Third, the management (...)
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  • A Paradox Perspective on Corporate Sustainability: Descriptive, Instrumental, and Normative Aspects.Tobias Hahn, Frank Figge, Jonatan Pinkse & Lutz Preuss - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (2):235-248.
    The last decade has witnessed the emergence of a paradox perspective on corporate sustainability. By explicitly acknowledging tensions between different desirable, yet interdependent and conflicting sustainability objectives, a paradox perspective enables decision makers to achieve competing sustainability objectives simultaneously and creates leeway for superior business contributions to sustainable development. In stark contrast to the business case logic, a paradox perspective does not establish emphasize business considerations over concerns for environmental protection and social well-being at the societal level. In order to (...)
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  • Management Information System? A Tool for Corporate Sustainability.Andrea Caldelli & Marisa Luisa Parmigiani - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (2):159-171.
    This paper represents the attempt to define a methodology that can evaluate the degree to which companies' information systems correspond to needs determined by the objectives of sustainability the firm imposes on itself. The result is the creation of a general model which define the correct approach to evaluating information systems - a model which should be adapted to the specificity of each single company which intends to adopt it. In the chart indicated, we obviously have not considered activities connected (...)
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  • Shifting Paradigms in Corporate Environmentalism: From Poachers to Gamekeepers.Sukhbir Sandhu - 2010 - Business and Society Review 115 (3):285-310.
    ABSTRACTThis article provides an insight into the changing role of businesses in dealing with the natural environment issues. From being regarded as poachers of the natural environment, many businesses have now started to position themselves as gamekeepers of the natural environment. This article traces the events and factors that have contributed toward this shift. The article starts with an introduction to the current state of the natural environment. It then discusses the role that businesses have traditionally played in contributing toward (...)
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