Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Impact of CSR on Corporate Reputation Perceptions of the Public-A Configurational Multi-Time, Multi-Source Perspective.Lisa Maria Rothenhoefer - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (2):141-155.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Won’T Get Fooled Again: The Effects of Internal and External Csr Eco-Labeling.Jordy F. Gosselt, Thomas van Rompay & Laura Haske - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):413-424.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Role of CSR in Crises: Integration of Situational Crisis Communication Theory and the Persuasion Knowledge Model.Chang-Dae Ham & Jeesun Kim - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    Despite widespread discussion of the impact of corporate social responsibility activities on consumer perceptions, little research has examined how consumers cope with CSR-based crisis response messages as a bolstering strategy. To fill this gap, we propose a framework integrating situational crisis communication theory with the persuasion knowledge model, applying the model to an experiment with a 2 × 2 × 2 between-subjects factorial design. In Study 1, we found interaction effects between CSR motives and crisis type on word-of-mouth intention and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Frontline Employees as Corporate Social Responsibility Ambassadors: A Quasi-Field Experiment.Laura Marie Edinger-Schons, Lars Lengler-Graiff, Sabrina Scheidler & Jan Wieseke - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    As past research has identified frontline employees as the primary communicators of a company’s CSR, this paper reports on a large-scale quasi-field experiment aimed at gaining a deeper understanding of the levers of successful in-store, point-of-sale, CSR communication. In cooperation with a large international retailer, the authors analyzed the effects of varying in-store CSR communication strategies in 48 unique stores, combining data from a customer survey, company records of customers’ real visits and purchases, and interviews with store managers. Taking into (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Be Bad but Look Good: Can Controversial Industries Enhance Corporate Reputation Through CSR Initiatives?Claudio Aqueveque, Pablo Rodrigo & Ignacio J. Duran - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (3):222-237.
    Even though the link between perceived corporate social responsibility fit and corporate reputation has received much attention from scholars, this tradition has ignored that the underpinnings of this association vary depending on the particular characteristics of each industry under study. To delve into this matter, we investigate in the increasingly relevant context of controversial industries how PCSR-fit could enhance corporate reputation and which are the mediating mechanisms of this association. Our academic contribution is twofold. First, we find that controversial sectors (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc: Methodological Limits of Performance-Oriented Studies in CSR.Marian Eabrasu - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24:S11-S23.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Identity Claims and Diffusion of Sustainability Report: Evidence From Korean Listed Companies, 2003–2010.Heejung Byun & Tae-Hyun Kim - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (3):551-565.
    This study integrates theories of diffusion and social identity to conceptualize the diffusion of Sustainability Report as a result of a firm’s identification with its reference groups. Specifically, we first hypothesize four different sources of external stakeholder pressures driving the diffusion. Next, we argue that the source of external stakeholder pressures has a differential effect on the adoption of SR for firms that claim their identity on sustainability management. For firms with organizational identity claims, in-group stakeholder pressure will amplify whereas (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Developing CSR Giving as a Dynamic Capability for Salient Stakeholder Management.John Ehsman Cantrell, Elias Kyriazis & Gary Noble - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):403-421.
  • Media Depictions of CEO Ethics and Stakeholder Support of CSR Initiatives: The Mediating Roles of CSR Motive Attributions and Cynicism.Babatunde Ogunfowora, Madelynn Stackhouse & Won-Yong Oh - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (2):525-540.
    Corporate social responsibility functions as a positive signal to stakeholders that a firm is a responsible corporate citizen. However, CSR is increasingly becoming an ambiguous signal of organizational goodwill because many companies engage in CSR purely out of self-interest, rather than genuine altruism. In this paper, we integrate attribution theory with signaling theory to explore how stakeholders react when they receive additional signals that contradict the company’s intended positive CSR signal. Specifically, we argue that morally questionable CEO ethics in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • CSR-Washing is Rare: A Conceptual Framework, Literature Review, and Critique.Shawn Pope & Arild Wæraas - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (1):173-193.
    Growth in CSR-washing claims in recent decades has been dramatic in numerous academic and activist contexts. The discourse, however, has been fragmented, and still lacks an integrated framework of the conditions necessary for successful CSR-washing. Theorizing successful CSR-washing as the joint occurrence of five conditions, this paper undertakes a literature review of the empirical evidence for and against each condition. The literature review finds that many of the conditions are either highly contingent, rendering CSR-washing as a complex and fragile outcome. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Understanding Purchase Intention During Product-Harm Crises: Moderating Effects of Perceived Corporate Ability and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW]Chieh-Peng Lin, Shwu-Chuan Chen, Chou-Kang Chiu & Wan-Yu Lee - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):455-471.
    A company’s product-harm crises often lead to negative publicity which substantially affects purchase intention. This study attempts to examine the purchase intention and its antecedents (e.g., perceived negative publicity) during product-harm crises by simultaneously including perceived corporate ability (CA) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) as moderators. In the study’s proposed model, purchase intention is indirectly affected by perceived CA, negative publicity, and CSR via the mediation of trust and affective identification. At the same time, the influences of perceived negative publicity (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Overcoming the ‘Window Dressing’ Effect: Mitigating the Negative Effects of Inherent Skepticism Towards Corporate Social Responsibility.Scott Connors, Stephen Anderson-MacDonald & Matthew Thomson - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (3):599-621.
    As more and more instances of corporate hypocrisy become public, consumers have developed an inherent general skepticism towards firms’ corporate social responsibility claims. As CSR skepticism bears heavily on consumers’ attitudes and behavior, this paper draws from Construal Level Theory to identify how it can be pre-emptively abated. We posit that this general skepticism towards CSR leads people to adopt a low-level construal mindset when processing CSR information. Across four studies, we show that matching this low-level mindset with concrete CSR (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Governance: Role of Context in International Settings.Suzanne Young & Vijaya Thyil - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (1):1-24.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Consumers’ Responses to Public Figures’ Transgression: Moral Reasoning Strategies and Implications for Endorsed Brands.Joon Sung Lee & Dae Hee Kwak - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (1):101-113.
    Public figures’ transgressions attract considerable media attention and public interest. However, little is understood about the impact of celebrity endorsers’ transgressions on associated brands. Drawing on research on moral reasoning, we posit that consumers are not always motivated to separate judgments of performance from judgments of morality or simply excuse a wrongdoer. We propose that consumers also engage in moral coupling, a distinct moral reasoning process which allows consumers to integrate judgments of performance and judgments of morality. In three studies, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Male Versus Female: How the Gender of Apologizers Influences Consumer Forgiveness.Haiying Wei & Yaxuan Ran - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (2):371-387.
    In a corporate apology, the apologizer can be either a male or a female. How does the gender of the apologizer influence consumer forgiveness? We suggest that the relative effectiveness of corporate apologies made by males versus females depends on the nature of the corporate wrongdoing, namely whether the wrongdoing is related to performance or to value. Three experiments demonstrate that a male apologizer elicits more consumer forgiveness than a female apologizer for performance-related wrongdoings, while a female apologizer garners more (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Do Lenders Value Corporate Social Responsibility? Evidence From China.Kangtao Ye & Ran Zhang - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):197-206.
    Drawing on risk mitigation theory, this article examines whether the improvement of firms’ social performance reduces debt financing costs (CDFs) in China, the world’s largest emerging market. Employing both the ordinary least square (OLS) and the two-stage instrumental variable regression methods, we find that improved corporate social responsibility (CSR) reduces the CDF when firms’ CSR investment is lower than an optimal level; however, this relationship is reversed after the CSR investment exceeds the optimal level. Firms with extremely low or extremely (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • The Role of Infomediaries: CSR in the Business Press During 2000–2009. [REVIEW]Maria Grafström & Karolina Windell - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (2):221-237.
    Given the important role that business media play in corporate life, scarce attention has been paid to the role of media in the construction and popularization of corporate social responsibility (CSR). In this article, we understand media as a key infomediary and examine how the business press has framed and presented CSR over the last 10 years. Based on a content analysis of how CSR is presented in two English-language business newspapers with an international readership, we develop a framework for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Perceived Organizational Motives and Consumer Responses to Proactive and Reactive CSR.Mark D. Groza, Mya R. Pronschinske & Matthew Walker - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):639-652.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has emerged as an effective way for firms to create favorable attitudes among consumers. Although prior research has addressed the direct influence of proactive and reactive CSR on consumer responses, this research hypothesized that consumers’ perceived organizational motives (i.e., attributions) will mediate this relationship. It was also hypothesized that the source of information and location of CSR initiative will affect the motives consumers assign to a firms’ engagement in the initiative. Two experiments were conducted to test (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • How Sustainability Ratings Might Deter 'Greenwashing': A Closer Look at Ethical Corporate Communication. [REVIEW]Béatrice Parguel, Florence Benoît-Moreau & Fabrice Larceneux - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):15-28.
    Of the many ethical corporate marketing practices, many firms use corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication to enhance their corporate image. Yet, consumers, overwhelmed by these more or less well-founded CSR claims, often have trouble identifying truly responsible firms. This confusion encourages ‘greenwashing’ and may make CSR initiatives less effective. On the basis of attribution theory, this study investigates the role of independent sustainability ratings on consumers’ responses to companies’ CSR communication. Experimental results indicate the negative effect of a poor sustainability (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Do ESG Controversies Matter for Firm Value? Evidence From International Data.Amal Aouadi & Sylvain Marsat - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (4):1027-1047.
    The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between environmental, social, and governance controversies and firm market value. We use a unique dataset of more than 4000 firms from 58 countries during 2002–2011. Primary analysis surprisingly shows that ESG controversies are associated with greater firm value. However, when interacted with the corporate social performance score, ESG controversies are found to have no direct effect on firm value while the interaction appears to be highly and significantly positive. Building on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Corporate Socially Responsible Initiatives and Their Effects on Consumption of Green Products.Simona Romani, Silvia Grappi & Richard P. Bagozzi - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (2):253-264.
    Corporate social responsibility research has focused often on the business returns of corporate social initiatives but less on their possible social returns. We study an actual company–consumer partnership CSR initiative promoting ecologically correct and conscious consumption of bottled mineral water. We conduct a survey on adult consumers to test the hypotheses that consumer skepticism toward the company–consumer partnership CSR initiative and the moral emotion of elevation mediate the relationship between company CSR motives perceived by consumers and consumer behavioral responses following (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Gray Shades of Green: Causes and Consequences of Green Skepticism.Constantinos N. Leonidou & Dionysis Skarmeas - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (2):401-415.
    Consumer skepticism of corporate environmental activities is on the rise. Yet research on this timely, intriguing, and important topic is scarce for both academics and practitioners. Building on attribution theory, we develop and test a theoretically anchored model that explains the sources and consequences of green skepticism. The study findings reveal that consumers’ perceptions of industry norms, corporate social responsibility, and corporate history are important factors that explain why consumers assign different motives to corporate environmental actions. In addition, the results (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Investor Reactions to Concurrent Positive and Negative Stakeholder News.Christopher Groening & Vamsi K. Kanuri - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (4):833-856.
    This paper examines the impact on firm value created by investor reaction to same day news of corporate social responsibility and corporate social irresponsibility activities. First, using trading volume, the authors establish that the perceived value of moral capital generated by news involving institutional stakeholders is less clear to investors than that of the news involving technical stakeholders. Subsequently, the authors analyze abnormal returns from 565 unique firm events—each comprising at least one positive and one negative stakeholder news item. Using (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Impact of Board Diversity and Gender Composition on Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Reputation.Stephen Bear, Noushi Rahman & Corinne Post - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):207 - 221.
    This article explores how the diversity of board resources and the number of women on boards affect firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) ratings, and how, in turn, CSR influences corporate reputation. In addition, this article examines whether CSR ratings mediate the relationships among board resource diversity, gender composition, and corporate reputation. The OLS regression results using lagged data for independent and control variables were statistically significant for the gender composition hypotheses, but not for the resource diversitybased hypotheses. CSR ratings had (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  • Perceived Greenwashing: The Interactive Effects of Green Advertising and Corporate Environmental Performance on Consumer Reactions. [REVIEW]Gergely Nyilasy, Harsha Gangadharbatla & Angela Paladino - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (4):1-15.
    The current study investigates the effects of green advertising and a corporation’s environmental performance on brand attitudes and purchase intentions. A 3 × 3 (firm’s environmental performance and its advertising efforts as independent variables) experiment using n = 302 subjects was conducted. Results indicate that the negative effect of a firm’s low performance on brand attitudes becomes stronger in the presence of green advertising compared to general corporate advertising and no advertising. Further, when the firm’s environmental performance is high, both (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations