Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Characterizing the Imaginative Attitude.Nicholas Wiltsher - forthcoming - Philosophical Papers:1-33.
    Three thoughts strongly influence recent work on sensory imagination, often without explicit articulation. The image thought says that all mental states involving a mental image are imaginative. The attitude thought says that, if there is a distinctive imaginative attitude, it is a single, monolithic attitude. The function thought says that the functions of sensory imagination are identical or akin to functions of other mental states such as judgment or belief. Taken together, these thoughts create a theoretical context within which eliminativism (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Common Frame for Formal Imagination.Joan Casas-Roma, M. Elena Rodríguez & Antonia Huertas - forthcoming - Minds and Machines:1-32.
    In this paper, we review three influential theories of imagination in order to understand how the dynamics of imagination acts could be modeled using formal languages. While reviewing them, we notice that they are not detailed enough to account for all the mechanisms involved in creating and developing imaginary worlds. We claim those theories could be further refined into what we call the Common Frame for Imagination Acts, which defines a framework that can be used to study the dynamics of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Religious Credence is Not Factual Belief.Neil Van Leeuwen - 2014 - Cognition 133 (3):698-715.
    I argue that psychology and epistemology should posit distinct cognitive attitudes of religious credence and factual belief, which have different etiologies and different cognitive and behavioral effects. I support this claim by presenting a range of empirical evidence that religious cognitive attitudes tend to lack properties characteristic of factual belief, just as attitudes like hypothesis, fictional imagining, and assumption for the sake of argument generally lack such properties. Furthermore, religious credences have distinctive properties of their own. To summarize: factual beliefs (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Imagination and the Imaginary, by Kathleen Lennon. [REVIEW]Amy Kind - 2016 - Mind 125 (500):1244-1251.
    Imagination and the Imaginary, by LennonKathleen. London : Routledge, 2015. Pp. viii + 145.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Two Faces of Mental Imagery.Margherita Arcangeli - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Mental imagery has often been taken to be equivalent to “sensory imagination”, the perception‐like type of imagination at play when, for example, one visually imagines a flower when none is there, or auditorily imagines a music passage while wearing earplugs. I contend that the equation of mental imagery with sensory imagination stems from a confusion between two senses of mental imagery. In the first sense, mental imagery is used to refer to a psychological attitude, which is perception‐like in nature. In (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Mental Imagery and Fiction.Dustin Stokes - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (6):731-754.
    Fictions evoke imagery, and their value consists partly in that achievement. This paper offers analysis of this neglected topic. Section 2 identifies relevant philosophical background. Section 3 offers a working definition of imagery. Section 4 identifies empirical work on visual imagery. Sections 5 and 6 criticize imagery essentialism, through the lens of genuine fictional narratives. This outcome, though, is not wholly critical. The expressed spirit of imagery essentialism is to encourage philosophers to ‘put the image back into the imagination’. The (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Imagining Experiences.Peter Langland‐Hassan - 2016 - Noûs:561-586.
    It is often held that in imagining experiences we exploit a special imagistic way of representing mentality—one that enables us to think about mental states in terms of what it is like to have them. According to some, when this way of thinking about the mind is paired with more objective means, an explanatory gap between the phenomenal and physical features of mental states arises. This paper advances a view along those lines, but with a twist. What many take for (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Ethics of Belief in Student Ability.Jeff Standley - 2019 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 53 (1):61-76.
  • The Imagination Model of Implicit Bias.Anna Welpinghus - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-23.
    We can understand implicit bias as a person’s disposition to evaluate members of a social group in a less favorable light than members of another social group, without intending to do so. If we understand it this way, we should not presuppose a one-size-fits-all answer to the question of how implicit cognitive states lead to skewed evaluations of other people. The focus of this paper is on implicit bias in considered decisions. It is argued that we have good reasons to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • No Right to Unilaterally Claim Your Territory: On the Consistency of Kantian Statism.Jakob Huber - 2017 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 20 (6):677-696.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Territorial Rights Open Borders.Clara Sandelind - 2015 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 18 (5):1-21.
  • Imaginative Content, Design-Assumptions and Immersion.Alon Chasid - 2017 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 8 (2):259-272.
    In this paper, I will analyze certain aspects of imaginative content, namely the content of the representational mental state called “imagining.” I will show that fully accounting for imaginative content requires acknowledging that, in addition to imagining, an imaginative project—the overall mental activity we engage in when we imagine—includes another infrastructural component in terms of which content should be explained. I will then show that the phenomenon of imaginative immersion can partly be explained in terms of the proposed infrastructure of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Sensorimotor Expectations and the Visual Field.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - forthcoming - Synthese:1-16.
    Sensorimotor expectations concern how visual experience covaries with bodily movement. Sensorimotor theorists argue from such expectations to the conclusion that the phenomenology of vision is constitutively embodied: objects within the visual field are experienced as 3-D because sensorimotor expectations partially constitute our experience of such objects. Critics argue that there are two ways to block the above inference: to explain how we visually experience objects as 3-D, one may appeal to such non-bodily factors as expectations about movements of objects, not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Territorial Rights and Open Borders.Clara Sandelind - 2015 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 18 (5):487-507.
  • The Meanings of “Imagine” Part II: Attitude and Action.Neil Van Leeuwen - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (11):791-802.
    In this Part II, I investigate different approaches to the question of what makes imagining different from belief. I find that the sentiment-based approach of David Hume falls short, as does the teleological approach, once advocated by David Velleman. I then consider whether the inferential properties of beliefs and imaginings may differ. Beliefs, I claim, exhibit an anti-symmetric inferential governance over imaginings: they are the background that makes inference from one imagining to the other possible; the reverse is not true, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations