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  1. Using Questions to Improve Informed Consent Form Reading Behavior in Students.Michael M. Knepp - 2018 - Ethics and Behavior 28 (7):560-577.
    Previous research shows that students often do not read informed consent forms to understand their rights. Four hundred fifty-eight students participated in an advertised temperament study that actually measured whether they noticed a manipulation within the consent form. Answering five questions about the form raised the percentage of students noticing the manipulation in multiple settings; however, overall rates were low. Fewer than 10% of ethnic minority students noticed the manipulation. If the goal of consent forms in higher education remains an (...)
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  • Uninformed Consent? The Effect of Participant Characteristics and Delivery Format on Informed Consent.Kyle R. Ripley, Margaret A. Hance, Stacey A. Kerr, Lauren E. Brewer & Kyle E. Conlon - 2018 - Ethics and Behavior 28 (7):517-543.
    Although many people choose to sign consent forms and participate in research, how many thoroughly read a consent form before signing it? Across 3 experiments using 348 undergraduate student participants, we examined whether personality characteristics as well as consent form content, format, and delivery method were related to thorough reading. Students repeatedly failed to read the consent forms, although small effects were found favoring electronic delivery methods and traditional format forms. Potential explanations are discussed and include participant apathy, participants trying (...)
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  • Comprehension of Online Informed Consents: Can It Be Improved?Nikolina M. Duvall Antonacopoulos & Ralph C. Serin - 2016 - Ethics and Behavior 26 (3):177-193.
    This study examined possible ways to ensure that participants provide fully informed consent for online surveys. Participants were randomly assigned to read either a traditional informed consent or one of three modified versions: enhanced, consent for each key element, or a combination of these two. Those who read the combination version scored higher on a comprehension quiz, guessed at fewer questions, and were more likely to read all of the informed consent than those who received the traditional version. These findings (...)
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  • Do Undergraduate Student Research Participants Read Psychological Research Consent Forms? Examining Memory Effects, Condition Effects, and Individual Differences.Eric R. Pedersen, Clayton Neighbors, Judy Tidwell & Ty W. Lostutter - 2011 - Ethics and Behavior 21 (4):332 - 350.
    Although research has examined factors influencing understanding of informed consent in biomedical and forensic research, less is known about participants' attention to details in consent documents in psychological survey research. The present study used a randomized experimental design and found the majority of participants were unable to recall information from the consent form in both in-person and online formats. Participants were also relatively poor at recognizing important aspects of the consent form including risks to participants and confidentiality procedures. Memory effects (...)
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  • Is It Time to Abandon Paper? The Use of Emails and the Internet for Health Services Research – a Cost‐Effectiveness and Qualitative Study.Jennifer Hunter, Katherine Corcoran, Stephen Leeder & Kerryn Phelps - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):855-861.