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  1. Does Geographic Proximity Influence The Expression of Avuncular Tendencies in Canadian Androphilic Males?Miranda L. Abild, Paul L. Vasey & Doug P. VanderLaan - 2014 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 14 (1-2):41-63.
    Androphilia refers to sexual attraction and arousal to adult males, whereas gynephilia refers to sexual attraction and arousal to adult females. The Kin Selection Hypothesis posits that male androphilia may persevere over evolutionary time if the fitness costs of not reproducing directly are offset by increasing one’s inclusive fitness. Theoretically, this could be accomplished by allocating altruism toward close kin, thereby increasing the ability of those kin to reproduce. Evidence for this hypothesis has been garnered from research conducted in Samoa; (...)
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  • Male Sexual Orientation and Avuncularity in Canada: Implications for the Kin Selection Hypothesis.Deanna L. Forrester, Jessica L. Parker, Paul L. Vasey & Doug P. VanderLaan - 2011 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 11 (3-4):339-352.
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  • Male Androphilia in the Ancestral Environment.Doug P. VanderLaan, Zhiyuan Ren & Paul L. Vasey - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (4):375-401.
    The kin selection hypothesis posits that male androphilia (male sexual attraction to adult males) evolved because androphilic males invest more in kin, thereby enhancing inclusive fitness. Increased kin-directed altruism has been repeatedly documented among a population of transgendered androphilic males, but never among androphilic males in other cultures who adopt gender identities as men. Thus, the kin selection hypothesis may be viable if male androphilia was expressed in the transgendered form in the ancestral past. Using the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS), (...)
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