Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. How Designers Work - Making Sense of Authentic Cognitive Activities.Henrik Gedenryd - 1998 - Dissertation, Lund University
    In recent years, the growing scientific interest in design has led to great advances in our knowledge of authentic design processes. However, as these findings go counter to the existing theories in both design research and cognitive science, they pose a serious challenge for both disciplines: there is a wide gap between what the existing theories predict and what designers actually do. At the same time, there is a growing movement of research on authentic cognitive activities, which has among other (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • A Short Primer on Situated Cognition.Philip Robbins & Murat Aydede - 2009 - In Murat Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 3--10.
    Introductory Chapter to the _Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition_ (CUP, 2019).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  • Six Views of Embodied Cognition.Margaret Wilson - 2002 - Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 9 (4):625--636.
  • What Could Cognition Be If Not Computation…Or Connectionism, or Dynamic Systems?Mark H. Bickhard - 2015 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 35 (1):53-66.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Building Cognition: The Construction of Computational Representations for Scientific Discovery.Sanjay Chandrasekharan & Nancy J. Nersessian - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (8):1727-1763.
    Novel computational representations, such as simulation models of complex systems and video games for scientific discovery, are dramatically changing the way discoveries emerge in science and engineering. The cognitive roles played by such computational representations in discovery are not well understood. We present a theoretical analysis of the cognitive roles such representations play, based on an ethnographic study of the building of computational models in a systems biology laboratory. Specifically, we focus on a case of model-building by an engineer that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Interpreting Scientific and Engineering Practices: Integrating the Cognitive, Social, and Cultural Dimensions.N. J. Nersessian - 2005 - In M. Gorman, R. Tweney, D. Gooding & A. Kincannon (eds.), Scientific and Technological Thinking. Erlbaum. pp. 17--56.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • In Defense of Representation.Arthur B. Markman & Eric Dietrich - 2000 - Cognitive Psychology 40 (2):138--171.
    The computational paradigm, which has dominated psychology and artificial intelligence since the cognitive revolution, has been a source of intense debate. Recently, several cognitive scientists have argued against this paradigm, not by objecting to computation, but rather by objecting to the notion of representation. Our analysis of these objections reveals that it is not the notion of representation per se that is causing the problem, but rather specific properties of representations as they are used in various psychological theories. Our analysis (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • The Resilience of Computationalism.Gualtiero Piccinini - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (5):852-861.
    Roughly speaking, computationalism says that cognition is computation, or that cognitive phenomena are explained by the agent‘s computations. The cognitive processes and behavior of agents are the explanandum. The computations performed by the agents‘ cognitive systems are the proposed explanans. Since the cognitive systems of biological organisms are their nervous 1 systems (plus or minus a bit), we may say that according to computationalism, the cognitive processes and behavior of organisms are explained by neural computations. Some people might prefer to (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Semiotic Systems, Computers, and the Mind: How Cognition Could Be Computing.William J. Rapaport - 2012 - International Journal of Signs and Semiotic Systems 2 (1):32-71.
    In this reply to James H. Fetzer’s “Minds and Machines: Limits to Simulations of Thought and Action”, I argue that computationalism should not be the view that (human) cognition is computation, but that it should be the view that cognition (simpliciter) is computable. It follows that computationalism can be true even if (human) cognition is not the result of computations in the brain. I also argue that, if semiotic systems are systems that interpret signs, then both humans and computers are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • A Theoretical Framework for the Study of Spatial Cognition.Maurizio Tirassa, Antonella Carassa & Giuliano Geminiani - 2000 - In [Book Chapter].
    We argue that the locomotion of organisms is better understood as a form of interaction with a subjective environment, rather than as a set of behaviors allegedly amenable to objective descriptions. An organism's interactions with its subjective environment are in turn understandable in terms of its cognitive architecture. We propose a large-scale classification of the possible types of cognitive architectures, giving a sketch of the subjective structure that each of them superimposes on space and of the relevant consequences on locomotion. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Semiotic Actor: From Signs to Socially Constructed Meaning.Martin Helmhout, René J. Jorna & Henk W. Gazendam - 2009 - Semiotica 2009 (175):335-377.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On the Subsymbolic Nature of a PDP Architecture That Uses a Nonmonotonic Activation Function.Michael R. W. Dawson & C. Darren Piercey - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11 (2):197-218.
    PDP networks that use nonmonotonic activation functions often produce hidden unit regularities that permit the internal structure of these networks to be interpreted (Berkeley et al., 1995; McCaughan, 1997; Dawson, 1998). In particular, when the responses of hidden units to a set of patterns are graphed using jittered density plots, these plots organize themselves into a set of discrete stripes or bands. In some cases, each band is associated with a local interpretation. On the basis of these observations, Berkeley (2000) (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The History and Philosophy of Ecological Psychology.Lorena Lobo, Manuel Heras-Escribano & David Travieso - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Neural Computation and the Computational Theory of Cognition.Gualtiero Piccinini & Sonya Bahar - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (3):453-488.
    We begin by distinguishing computationalism from a number of other theses that are sometimes conflated with it. We also distinguish between several important kinds of computation: computation in a generic sense, digital computation, and analog computation. Then, we defend a weak version of computationalism—neural processes are computations in the generic sense. After that, we reject on empirical grounds the common assimilation of neural computation to either analog or digital computation, concluding that neural computation is sui generis. Analog computation requires continuous (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  • Cognitive Science: Emerging Perspectives and Approaches.Narayanan Srinivasan - 2011 - In Girishwar Misra (ed.), Handbook of Psychology in India. Oxford University Press. pp. 46--57.
  • Integrating, Not Debating, Situated Action and Computational Models: Taking the Environment Seriously.Michael D. Byrne - 1994 - In Ashwin Ram & Kurt Eiselt (eds.), Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Erlbaum. pp. 118--123.
  • Embodied Cognition: A Field Guide.Michael L. Anderson - 2003 - Artificial Intelligence 149 (1):91-130.
    The nature of cognition is being re-considered. Instead of emphasizing formal operations on abstract symbols, the new approach foregrounds the fact that cognition is, rather, a situated activity, and suggests that thinking beings ought therefore be considered first and foremost as acting beings. The essay reviews recent work in Embodied Cognition, provides a concise guide to its principles, attitudes and goals, and identifies the physical grounding project as its central research focus.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  • Complexity, Hypersets, and the Ecological Perspective on Perception-Action.Anthony Chemero & M. T. Turvey - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (1):23-36.
    The ecological approach to perception-action is unlike the standard approach in several respects. It takes the animal-in-its-environment as the proper scale for the theory and analysis of perception-action, it eschews symbol based accounts of perception-action, it promotes self-organization as the theory-constitutive metaphor for perception-action, and it employs self-referring, non-predicative definitions in explaining perception-action. The present article details the complexity issues confronted by the ecological approach in terms suggested by Rosen and introduces non-well-founded set theory as a potentially useful tool for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Situated Action, Symbol Systems and Universal Computation.Andrew Wells - 1996 - Minds and Machines 6 (1):33-46.
    Vera & Simon (1993a) have argued that the theories and methods known as situated action or situativity theory are compatible with the assumptions and methodology of the physical symbol systems hypothesis and do not require a new approach to the study of cognition. When the central criterion of computational universality is added to the loose definition of a symbol system which Vera and Simon provide, it becomes apparent that there are important incompatibilities between the two approaches such that situativity theory (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Epistemological Approach to the Process of Practice.Richard Dazeley & Beyong Ho Kang - 2008 - Minds and Machines 18 (4):547-567.
    Systems based on symbolic knowledge have performed extremely well in processing reason, yet, remain beset with problems of brittleness in many domains. Connectionist approaches do similarly well in emulating interactive domains, however, have struggled when modelling higher brain functions. Neither of these dichotomous approaches, however, have provided many inroads into the area of human reasoning that psychology and sociology refer to as the process of practice. This paper argues that the absence of a model for the process of practise in (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Overlooked skyhooks.Robert L. Campbell - 1998 - Metascience 7 (3):489-499.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Philosophy of Cognitive Science.Margaret A. Boden - 2001 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 48:209-226.
    If the Trade Descriptions Act were applied to academic labels, cognitive scientists would be in trouble. For what they do is much wider than the name suggests—and wider, too, than most philosophers assume. They give you more for your money than you may have expected.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • CaMeRa: A Computational Model of Multiple Representations.Hermina J. M. Tabachneck-Schijf, Anthony M. Leonardo & Herbert A. Simon - 1997 - Cognitive Science 21 (3):305-350.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Empirical Detection of Creativity.Han L. J. van der Maas & Peter C. M. Molenaar - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):555-555.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Computational Creativity: What Place for Literature?Jörgen Pind - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):547-548.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Historical Basis of Scientific Discovery.Gerd Grasshoff - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):545-546.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Lady Lovelace Had It Right: Computers Originate Nothing.Selmer Bringsjord - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):532-533.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Computation: Part of the Problem of Creativity.Merlin Donald - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):537-538.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Creativity: Metarules and Emergent Systems.Jonathan Rowe - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):550-551.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Analogy Programs and Creativity.Bruce D. Burns - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):535-535.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Doing the Impossible.Robert L. Campbell - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):535-537.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Can Artificial Intelligence Explain Age Changes in Literary Creativity?Carolyn Adams-Price - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):532-532.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Creativity is in the Mind of the Creator.Ashwin Ram, Eric Domeshek, Linda Wills, Nancy Nersessian & Janet Kolodner - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):549-549.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What About Everyday Creativity?Nick V. Flor - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):540-542.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Goals, Analogy, and the Social Constraints of Scientific Discovery.Kevin Dunbar & Lisa M. Baker - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):538-539.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Can Computers Be Creative, or Even Disappointed?Robert J. Sternberg - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):553-554.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Machine Discoverers: Transforming the Spaces They Explore.Jan M. Zytkow - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):557-558.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What is the Difference Between Real Creativity and Mere Novelty?Alan Bundy - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):533-534.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Creativity: Myths? Mechanisms.Michel Treisman - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):554-555.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Creativity, Combination, and Cognition.Terry Dartnall - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):537-537.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Birth of an Idea.Liane M. Gabora - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):543-543.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Creativity: A Framework for Research.Margaret A. Boden - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):558-570.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Generative-Rules Definition of Creativity.Joseph O'Rourke - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):547-547.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Creative Thinking Presupposes the Capacity for Thought.James H. Fetzer - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):539-540.
  • Respecting the Phenomenology of Human Creativity.Victor A. Shames & John F. Kihlstrom - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):551-552.
  • Creativity, Madness, and Extra Strong Al.K. W. M. Fulford - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):542-543.
  • Individual Differences, Developmental Changes, and Social Context.Dean Keith Simonton - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):552-553.
  • The Creative Mind Versus the Creative Computer.Robert W. Weisberg - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):555-557.
  • Imagery and Creativity.Klaus Rehkämper - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):550-550.
  • Conscious Thought Processes and Creativity.Maria F. Ippolito - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):546-547.