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  1. Integrating, Not Debating, Situated Action and Computational Models: Taking the Environment Seriously.Michael D. Byrne - 1994 - In Ashwin Ram & Kurt Eiselt (eds.), Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Erlbaum. pp. 118--123.
  • The Empirical Detection of Creativity.Han L. J. van der Maas & Peter C. M. Molenaar - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):555-555.
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  • Computational Creativity: What Place for Literature?Jörgen Pind - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):547-548.
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  • The Historical Basis of Scientific Discovery.Gerd Grasshoff - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):545-546.
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  • Lady Lovelace Had It Right: Computers Originate Nothing.Selmer Bringsjord - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):532-533.
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  • Computation: Part of the Problem of Creativity.Merlin Donald - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):537-538.
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  • Creativity: Metarules and Emergent Systems.Jonathan Rowe - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):550-551.
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  • Analogy Programs and Creativity.Bruce D. Burns - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):535-535.
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  • On Doing the Impossible.Robert L. Campbell - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):535-537.
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  • Can Artificial Intelligence Explain Age Changes in Literary Creativity?Carolyn Adams-Price - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):532-532.
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  • Creativity is in the Mind of the Creator.Ashwin Ram, Eric Domeshek, Linda Wills, Nancy Nersessian & Janet Kolodner - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):549-549.
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  • What About Everyday Creativity?Nick V. Flor - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):540-542.
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  • Goals, Analogy, and the Social Constraints of Scientific Discovery.Kevin Dunbar & Lisa M. Baker - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):538-539.
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  • Can Computers Be Creative, or Even Disappointed?Robert J. Sternberg - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):553-554.
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  • Machine Discoverers: Transforming the Spaces They Explore.Jan M. Zytkow - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):557-558.
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  • What is the Difference Between Real Creativity and Mere Novelty?Alan Bundy - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):533-534.
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  • Creativity: Myths? Mechanisms.Michel Treisman - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):554-555.
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  • Creativity, Combination, and Cognition.Terry Dartnall - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):537-537.
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  • The Birth of an Idea.Liane M. Gabora - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):543-543.
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  • Creativity: A Framework for Research.Margaret A. Boden - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):558-570.
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  • The Generative-Rules Definition of Creativity.Joseph O'Rourke - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):547-547.
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  • Creative Thinking Presupposes the Capacity for Thought.James H. Fetzer - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):539-540.
  • Respecting the Phenomenology of Human Creativity.Victor A. Shames & John F. Kihlstrom - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):551-552.
  • Creativity, Madness, and Extra Strong Al.K. W. M. Fulford - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):542-543.
  • The Creative Mind Versus the Creative Computer.Robert W. Weisberg - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):555-557.
  • Individual Differences, Developmental Changes, and Social Context.Dean Keith Simonton - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):552-553.
  • Imagery and Creativity.Klaus Rehkämper - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):550-550.
  • Conscious Thought Processes and Creativity.Maria F. Ippolito - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):546-547.
  • Creativity Theory: Detail and Testability.K. J. Gilhooly - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):544-545.
  • Art for Art's Sake.Alan Garnham - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):543-544.
    This piece is a commentary on a precis of Maggie Boden's book "The creative mind" published in Behavioral and Brain Sciences.
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  • Précis of The Creative Mind: Myths and Mechanisms.Margaret A. Boden - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):519-531.
  • Embodied Cognition: A Field Guide.Michael L. Anderson - 2003 - Artificial Intelligence 149 (1):91-130.
    The nature of cognition is being re-considered. Instead of emphasizing formal operations on abstract symbols, the new approach foregrounds the fact that cognition is, rather, a situated activity, and suggests that thinking beings ought therefore be considered first and foremost as acting beings. The essay reviews recent work in Embodied Cognition, provides a concise guide to its principles, attitudes and goals, and identifies the physical grounding project as its central research focus.
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  • The Resilience of Computationalism.Gualtiero Piccinini - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (5):852-861.
    Roughly speaking, computationalism says that cognition is computation, or that cognitive phenomena are explained by the agent‘s computations. The cognitive processes and behavior of agents are the explanandum. The computations performed by the agents‘ cognitive systems are the proposed explanans. Since the cognitive systems of biological organisms are their nervous 1 systems (plus or minus a bit), we may say that according to computationalism, the cognitive processes and behavior of organisms are explained by neural computations. Some people might prefer to (...)
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  • Animats and What They Can Tell Us.Jeffrey Dean - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):60-67.
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  • How Velmans' Conscious Experiences Affected Our Brains.Ron Chrisley & Aaron Sloman - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (11):58-62.
    Velmans’ paper raises three problems concerning mental causation: (1) How can consciousness affect the physical, given that the physical world appears causally closed? 10 (2) How can one be in conscious control of processes of which one is not consciously aware? (3) Conscious experiences appear to come too late to causally affect the processes to which they most obviously relate. In an appendix Velmans gives his reasons for refusing to resolve these problems through adopting the position (which he labels ‘physicalism’) (...)
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  • Affordances for Robots: A Brief Survey.Thomas E. Horton, Arpan Chakraborty & Robert St Amant - 2012 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (2):70-84.
    In this paper, we consider the influence of Gibson's affordance theory on the design of robotic agents. Affordance theory (and the ecological approach to agent design in general) has in many cases contributed to the development of successful robotic systems; we provide a brief survey of AI research in this area. However, there remain significant issues that complicate discussions on this topic, particularly in the exchange of ideas between researchers in artificial intelligence and ecological psychology. We identify some of these (...)
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  • Building Cognition: The Construction of Computational Representations for Scientific Discovery.Sanjay Chandrasekharan & Nancy J. Nersessian - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (8):1727-1763.
    Novel computational representations, such as simulation models of complex systems and video games for scientific discovery, are dramatically changing the way discoveries emerge in science and engineering. The cognitive roles played by such computational representations in discovery are not well understood. We present a theoretical analysis of the cognitive roles such representations play, based on an ethnographic study of the building of computational models in a systems biology laboratory. Specifically, we focus on a case of model-building by an engineer that (...)
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  • Machery, E., 2006, Review of A. Zilhao, Ed., Evolution, Rationality and Cognition, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.Edouard Machery - unknown
  • A Theoretical Framework for the Study of Spatial Cognition.Maurizio Tirassa, Antonella Carassa & Giuliano Geminiani - 2000 - In [Book Chapter].
    We argue that the locomotion of organisms is better understood as a form of interaction with a subjective environment, rather than as a set of behaviors allegedly amenable to objective descriptions. An organism's interactions with its subjective environment are in turn understandable in terms of its cognitive architecture. We propose a large-scale classification of the possible types of cognitive architectures, giving a sketch of the subjective structure that each of them superimposes on space and of the relevant consequences on locomotion. (...)
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  • CaMeRa: A Computational Model of Multiple Representations.Hermina J. M. Tabachneck-Schijf, Anthony M. Leonardo & Herbert A. Simon - 1997 - Cognitive Science 21 (3):305-350.
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  • The Semiotic Actor: From Signs to Socially Constructed Meaning.Martin Helmhout, René J. Jorna & Henk W. Gazendam - 2009 - Semiotica 2009 (175):335-377.
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  • Reasoning Patterns and Innovation Management in a Neuro-Embryology Laboratory.Benoît Grison & Dominique Lestel - 1997 - Social Science Information 36 (3):541-555.
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  • Complexity, Hypersets, and the Ecological Perspective on Perception-Action.Anthony Chemero & M. T. Turvey - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (1):23-36.
    The ecological approach to perception-action is unlike the standard approach in several respects. It takes the animal-in-its-environment as the proper scale for the theory and analysis of perception-action, it eschews symbol based accounts of perception-action, it promotes self-organization as the theory-constitutive metaphor for perception-action, and it employs self-referring, non-predicative definitions in explaining perception-action. The present article details the complexity issues confronted by the ecological approach in terms suggested by Rosen and introduces non-well-founded set theory as a potentially useful tool for (...)
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  • Epistemological Approach to the Process of Practice.Richard Dazeley & Beyong Ho Kang - 2008 - Minds and Machines 18 (4):547-567.
    Systems based on symbolic knowledge have performed extremely well in processing reason, yet, remain beset with problems of brittleness in many domains. Connectionist approaches do similarly well in emulating interactive domains, however, have struggled when modelling higher brain functions. Neither of these dichotomous approaches, however, have provided many inroads into the area of human reasoning that psychology and sociology refer to as the process of practice. This paper argues that the absence of a model for the process of practise in (...)
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  • Turing's Analysis of Computation and Theories of Cognitive Architecture.A. J. Wells - 1998 - Cognitive Science 22 (3):269-294.
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  • Situated Action: Reply to William Clancey.Alonso H. Vera & Herbert A. Simon - 1993 - Cognitive Science 17 (1):117-133.
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  • Neural Computation and the Computational Theory of Cognition.Gualtiero Piccinini & Sonya Bahar - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (3):453-488.
    We begin by distinguishing computationalism from a number of other theses that are sometimes conflated with it. We also distinguish between several important kinds of computation: computation in a generic sense, digital computation, and analog computation. Then, we defend a weak version of computationalism—neural processes are computations in the generic sense. After that, we reject on empirical grounds the common assimilation of neural computation to either analog or digital computation, concluding that neural computation is sui generis. Analog computation requires continuous (...)
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  • Situated Action: A Neuropsychological Interpretation Response to Vera and Simon.William J. Clancey - 1993 - Cognitive Science 17 (1):87-116.
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  • Reconstructing Physical Symbol Systems.David S. Touretzky & Dean A. Pomerleau - 1994 - Cognitive Science 18 (2):345-353.
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  • Situativity and Symbols: Response to Vera and Simon.James G. Greeno & Joyce L. Moore - 1993 - Cognitive Science 17 (1):49-59.
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