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Science and an African Logic

University of Chicago Press (2001)

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  1. The Promise of Caribbean Philosophy: How It Can Cpntribute to a "New Dialogic" in Philosophy.Jennifer Lisa Vest - 2005 - Caribbean Studies 33 (2):3-34.
    The Caribbean is a site where multiple cultures, peoples, waysof thinking and acting have come together and where new formsof philosophy are emerging. The promise of Caribbean philoso-phy lays in its ability to give shape to an intellectual tradition which is both true to and beneficial to Caribbean peoples whilesimultaneously being provocative enough to engage wisdom-seekers of various geographies and identities. I argue that onlyby pursuing a “New Dialogic” which engages the philosophicaltraditions of Africans, African Americans, and Native Ameri-cans can (...)
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  • Plastic Neuroscience: Studying What the Brain Cares About.Joseph Dumit - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Inventing Oncomice: Making Natural Animal, Research Tool and Invention Cohere.Rosemary Robins - 2008 - Genomics, Society and Policy 4 (2):21-35.
    This paper examines how the oncomouse became a patentable invention. The oncomouse began life in the laboratory, where it was genetically modified for use as a research tool to assist with the study of human cancer. Its design, a product of genetic modification, made the oncomouse potentially patentable subject matter. The United States was the first jurisdiction to award the patent and several others followed. However, the question of animal patenting was most contentious in Europe and Canada. In this paper (...)
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  • Making a University. Introductory Notes on an Ecology of Study Practices.Hans Schildermans - 2019 - Dissertation, KU Leuven
    The question of how the university can relate to the world is centuries old. The poles of the debate can be characterized by the plea for an increasing instrumentalization of the university as a producer and provider of useful knowledge on the one hand (cf. the knowledge factory), and the defense of the university as an autonomous space for free inquiry and the pursuit of knowledge for knowledge’s sake on the other hand (cf. the ivory tower). Our current global predicament, (...)
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  • Multiplicity, Criticism and Knowing What to Do Next: Way‐Finding in a Transmodern World. Response to Meera Nanda’sProphets Facing Backwards.David Turnbull - 2005 - Social Epistemology 19 (1):19 – 32.
    The paper addresses the question of whether, as Nanda claims, treating all knowledge traditions including science as local, denies the possibility of criticism. It accepts the necessity for criticism but denies that science can be the sole arbiter of truth and argues that we have to live with holding differing knowledges in tension with one another.
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  • On Seeing the Generative Possibilities of Dalit Neo‐Buddhist Thought.Helen Verran - 2005 - Social Epistemology 19 (1):33 – 48.
    Nanda's irresponsible book carelessly prescribes for the U.S a return to Cold-War science politics; and for India, nothing less than a cultural revolution which would install science as the arbiter. She sees this as smashing the backwards looking metaphysics of Hindu thought. I argue that her iconoclasm carries with it a purist fetishism deriving from science's denied metaphysics. The metaphysics embedded in Nanda's secularist critique is no more innocent than that she wishes to smash, yet being denied is more tricky (...)
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  • Developing/Development Cyborgs.Casper Bruun Jensen - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):375-385.
    The paper takes as its starting point Donna Haraway’s suggestion, “The actors are cyborg, nature is coyote, and the geography is elsewhere”. It discusses first the understanding of the cyborg promoted by Haraway as illustrating an ontological non-humanist disposition, rather than a periodizing claim. The second part of the paper examines some instances of low-tech cyborg identities, which have emerged in developing countries (elsewhere) as a consequence of development initiatives. The paper argues that the quite literal attempts to develop cyborgs (...)
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  • Controlling Biotechnology: Science, Democracy and 'Civic Epistemology'. [REVIEW]Yaron Ezrahi - 2008 - Metascience 17 (2):177-198.
  • Social Robots: Things or Agents?Morana Alač - 2016 - AI and Society 31 (4):519-535.
  • Mathematical Relativism: Logic, Grammar, and Arithmetic in Cultural Comparison.Christian Greiffenhagen & Wes Sharrock - 2006 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 36 (2):97–117.
  • Moving the Centre to Design Social Media in Rural Africa.Nicola J. Bidwell - 2016 - AI and Society 31 (1):51-77.