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Fernando Vidal (2009). Brainhood, Anthropological Figure of Modernity.

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  1.  1
    A History of the Locked-In-Syndrome: Ethics in the Making of Neurological Consciousness, 1880-Present.Stephen T. Casper - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-17.
    Extensive scholarship has described the historical and ethical imperatives shaping the emergence of the brain death criteria in the 1960s and 1970s. This essay explores the longer intellectual history that shaped theories of neurological consciousness from the late-nineteenth century to that period, and argues that a significant transformation occurred in the elaboration of those theories in the 1960s and after, the period when various disturbances of consciousness were discovered or thoroughly elaborated. Numerous historical conditions can be identified and attributed to (...)
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  2.  2
    The “Violent Resident”: A Critical Exploration of the Ethics of Resident-to-Resident Aggression.Alisa Grigorovich, Pia Kontos & Alexis P. Kontos - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Resident-to-resident aggression is quite prevalent in long-term care settings. Within popular and empirical accounts, this form of aggression is most commonly attributed to the actions of an aberrant individual living with dementia characterized as the “violent resident.” It is often a medical diagnosis of dementia that is highlighted as the ultimate cause of aggression. This neglects the fact that acts of aggression are influenced by broader structural conditions. This has ethical implications in that the emphasis on individual aberration informs public (...)
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  3.  3
    What Makes Neuroethics Possible?Fernando Vidal - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269511880041.
  4.  2
    Situated Prevention: Framing the “New Dementia”.Annette Leibing - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (3):704-716.
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  5.  6
    Two Problematic Foundations of Neuroethics and Pragmatist Reconstructions.Eric Racine & Matthew Sample - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):566-577.
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  6.  5
    Neuroethics and Philosophy in Responsible Research and Innovation: The Case of the Human Brain Project.Arleen Salles, Kathinka Evers & Michele Farisco - 2018 - Neuroethics:1-11.
    Responsible Research and Innovation is an important ethical, legal, and political theme for the European Commission. Although variously defined, it is generally understood as an interactive process that engages social actors, researchers, and innovators who must be mutually responsive and work towards the ethical permissibility of the relevant research and its products. The framework of RRI calls for contextually addressing not just research and innovation impact but also the background research process, specially the societal visions underlying it and the norms (...)
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  7.  3
    From Disabled Students to Disabled Brains: The Medicalizing Power of Rhetorical Images in the Israeli Learning Disabilities Field.Katchergin Ofer - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (3):267-285.
    The neurocentric worldview that identifies the essence of the human being with the material brain has become a central paradigm in current academic discourse. Israeli researchers also seek to understand educational principles and processes via neuroscientific models. On this background, the article uncovers the central role that visual brain images play in the learning-disabilities field in Israel. It examines the place brain images have in the professional imagination of didactic-diagnosticians as well as their influence on the diagnosticians' clinical attitudes. It (...)
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  8.  2
    Neuroessentialism in Discussions About the Impact of Closed-Loop Technologies on Agency and Identity.Eric Racine, Ariane Quintal & Matthew Sample - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):81-83.
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  9.  6
    A Critique of an Epistemic Intellectual Culture: Cartesianism, Normativism and Modern Crises.V. P. J. Arponen - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (1):84-103.
    The so-called epistemological turn of the Descartes-Locke-Kant tradition is a hallmark of modern philosophy. The broad family of normativism constitutes one major response to the Cartesian heritage building upon some version of the idea that human knowledge, action and sociality build fundamentally upon some form of social agreement and standards. Representationalism and the Cartesian picture more generally have been challenged by normativists but this paper argues that, even where these challenges by normativism have been taken to heart, our intellectual culture (...)
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  10.  22
    The Death and the Resurrection of Critique: The Case of Neuroeducation.J. De Vos - 2016 - Foundations of Science 21 (1):129-145.
    A rapidly emerging hegemonic neuro-culture and a booming neural subjectivity signal the entry point for an inquiry into the status of the signifier neuro as a universal passe-partout. The wager of this paper is that the various appropriations of the neurosciences in the media and in academia itself point to something essential, if not structural, in connection with both the discipline of the neurosciences and the current socio-cultural and ideological climate. Starting from the case of neuroeducation, the genealogy of the (...)
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  11.  40
    Brain–Computer Interfaces and Dualism: A Problem of Brain, Mind, and Body.Joseph Lee - 2016 - AI and Society 31 (1):29-40.
  12.  14
    Biocertification and Neurodiversity: The Role and Implications of Self-Diagnosis in Autistic Communities.Jennifer Sarrett - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (1):23-36.
    Neurodiversity, the advocacy position that autism and related conditions are natural variants of human neurological outcomes that should be neither cured nor normalized, is based on the assertion that autistic people have unique neurological differences. Membership in this community as an autistic person largely results from clinical identification, or biocertification. However, there are many autistic individuals who diagnose themselves. This practice is contentious among autistic communities. Using data gathered from Wrong Planet, an online autism community forum, this article describes the (...)
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  13.  1
    Social Science and Neuroscience Beyond Interdisciplinarity: Experimental Entanglements.des FitzgeraldCallard Felicity - 2015 - Theory, Culture and Society 32 (1):3-32.
  14.  3
    George Combe and Common Sense.Sean Dyde - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Science 48 (2):233-259.
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  15.  9
    Of Psychometric Means: Starke R. Hathaway and the Popularization of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.Rebecca Schilling & Stephen T. Casper - 2015 - Science in Context 28 (1):77-98.
  16.  19
    Critical Neuroscience and Socially Extended Minds.J. Slaby & S. Gallagher - 2015 - Theory, Culture and Society 32 (1):33-59.
  17.  8
    Critical Neuroscience Meets Medical Humanities.Jan Slaby - 2015 - Medical Humanities 41 (1):16-22.
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  18.  35
    Brains, Neuroscience, and Animalism: On the Implications of Thinking Brains.Carl Gillett - 2014 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (S1):41-52.
    The neuroscience revolution has led many scientists to posit “expansive” or “thinking” brains that instantiate rich psychological properties. As a result, some scientists now even claim you are identical to such a brain. However, Eric Olson has offered new arguments that thinking brains cannot exist due to their intuitively “abominable” implications. After situating the commitment to thinking brains in the wider scientific discussions in which they are posited, I then critically assess Olson's arguments against such entities. Although highlighting an important (...)
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  19.  3
    An Experimental Public.Julia Laki - 2014 - The New Bioethics 20 (2):109-123.
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  20. What the Science of Morality Doesn't Say About Morality.G. Abend - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (2):157-200.
    In this article I ask what recent moral psychology and neuroscience can and can’t claim to have discovered about morality. I argue that the object of study of much recent work is not morality but a particular kind of individual moral judgment. But this is a small and peculiar sample of morality. There are many things that are moral yet not moral judgments. There are also many things that are moral judgments yet not of that particular kind. If moral things (...)
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  21.  12
    The Extent of Cognitivism.V. P. J. Arponen - 2013 - History of the Human Sciences 26 (5):0952695113500778.
    In this article, cognitivism is understood as the view that the engine of human (individual and collective) action is the intentional, dispositional, or other mental capacities of the brain or the mind. Cognitivism has been criticized for considering the essence of human action to reside in its alleged source in mental processes at the expense of the social surroundings of the action, criticism that has often been inspired by Ludwig Wittgenstein's later philosophy. This article explores the logical extent of the (...)
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  22.  7
    Badness, Madness and the Brain – the Late 19th-Century Controversy on Immoral Persons and Their Malfunctioning Brains.Felix Schirmann - 2013 - History of the Human Sciences 26 (2):33-50.
    In the second half of the 19th-century, a group of psychiatric experts discussed the relation between brain malfunction and moral misconduct. In the ensuing debates, scientific discourses on immorality merged with those on insanity and the brain. This yielded a specific definition of what it means to be immoral: immoral and insane due to a disordered brain. In this context, diverse neurobiological explanations for immoral mind and behavior existed at the time. This article elucidates these different brain-based explanations via five (...)
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  23.  24
    Material Translations in the Cartesian Brain.Nima Bassiri - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):244-255.
  24.  1
    Material Translations in the Cartesian Brain.Nima Bassiri - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):244-255.
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  25.  36
    Critical Studies of the Sexed Brain: A Critique of What and for Whom? [REVIEW]Cynthia Kraus - 2012 - Neuroethics 5 (3):247-259.
    The NeuroGenderings project is reminiscent of an interdisciplinary program called Critical Neuroscience. But the steps towards a feminist/queer Critical Neuroscience are complicated by the problematic ways in which critical neuroscientists conceive of their critical practices. They suggest that we work and talk across disciplines as if neuroscientists were from Mars and social scientists from Venus, assigning the latter to the traditional feminine role of assuaging conflict. This article argues that brain science studies scholars need to clarify how we want to (...)
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  26.  11
    Do Brains Think? Comparative Anatomy and the End of the Great Chain of Being in 19th-Century Britain.Elfed Huw Price - 2012 - History of the Human Sciences 25 (3):32-50.
    The nature of the relationship between mind and body is one of the greatest remaining mysteries. As such, the historical origin of the current dominant belief that mind is a function of the brain takes on especial significance. In this article I aim to explore and explain how and why this belief emerged in early 19th-century Britain. Between 1815 and 1819 two brain-based physiologies of mind were the subject of controversy and debate in Britain: the system of phrenology devised by (...)
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  27.  60
    Neuroethics, Gender and the Response to Difference.Deboleena Roy - 2012 - Neuroethics 5 (3):217-230.
    This paper examines how the new field of neuroethics is responding to the old problem of difference, particularly to those ideas of biological difference emerging from neuroimaging research that purports to further delineate our understanding of sex and/or gender differences in the brain. As the field develops, it is important to ask what is new about neuroethics compared to bioethics in this regard, and whether the concept of difference is being problematized within broader contexts of power and representation. As a (...)
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  28.  12
    “This is Why You've Been Suffering”: Reflections of Providers on Neuroimaging in Mental Health Care.Judy Illes Emily Borgelt, Daniel Z. Buchman - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):15.
    Mental health care providers increasingly confront challenges posed by the introduction of new neurotechnology into the clinic, but little is known about the impact of such capabilities on practice patterns and relationships with patients. To address this important gap, we sought providers’ perspectives on the potential clinical translation of functional neuroimaging for prediction and diagnosis of mental illness. We conducted 32 semi-structured telephone interviews with mental health care providers representing psychiatry, psychology, family medicine, and allied mental health. Our results suggest (...)
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  29.  6
    From Brain Image to the Bush Doctrine: Critical Neuroscience and the Political Uses of Neurotechnology.Suparna Choudhury, Ian Gold & Laurence J. Kirmayer - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (2):17-19.
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  30.  18
    The Persistence of the Subjective in Neuropsychopharmacology: Observations of Contemporary Hallucinogen Research.Nicolas Langlitz - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (1):37-57.
    The elimination of subjectivity through brain research and the replacement of so-called ‘folk psychology’ by a neuroscientifically enlightened worldview and self-conception has been both hoped for and feared. But this cultural revolution is still pending. Based on nine months of fieldwork on the revival of hallucinogen research since the ‘Decade of the Brain,’ this paper examines how subjective experience appears as epistemic object and practical problem in a psychopharmacological laboratory. In the quest for neural correlates of (drug-induced altered states of) (...)
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  31.  31
    Steps Towards a Critical Neuroscience.Jan Slaby - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):397-416.
    This paper introduces the motivation and idea behind the recently founded interdisciplinary initiative Critical Neuroscience ( http://www.critical-neuroscience.org ). Critical Neuroscience is an approach that strives to understand, explain, contextualize, and, where called for, critique developments in and around the social, affective, and cognitive neurosciences with the aim to create the competencies needed to responsibly deal with new challenges and concerns emerging in relation to the brain sciences. It addresses scholars in the humanities as well as, importantly, neuroscientific practitioners, policy makers, (...)
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