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  1. Promoting Justice, Trust, Compliance, and Health: The Case for Compensation.Michael J. Selgelid - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):22-24.
  • Advancing Global Health Equity in the COVID-19 Response: Beyond Solidarity.Stephanie B. Johnson - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):703-707.
    In the coming weeks and months SARS-CoV-2 may ravage countries with weak health systems and populations disproportionately affected by HIV, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases. Without safeguards and proper attention to global health equity and justice, the effects of this pandemic are likely to exacerbate existing health and socio-economic inequalities. This paper argues that achieving global health equity in the context of COVID-19 will require that notions of reciprocity and relational equity are introduced to the response.
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  • Ethics for Pandemics Beyond Influenza: Ebola, Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, and Anticipating Future Ethical Challenges in Pandemic Preparedness and Response.Maxwell J. Smith & Diego S. Silva - 2015 - Monash Bioethics Review 33 (2-3):130-147.
    The unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa has raised several novel ethical issues for global outbreak preparedness. It has also illustrated that familiar ethical issues in infectious disease management endure despite considerable efforts to understand and mitigate such issues in the wake of past outbreaks. To improve future global outbreak preparedness and response, we must examine these shortcomings and reflect upon the current state of ethical preparedness. To this end, we focus our efforts in this article on (...)
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  • A General Approach to Compensation for Losses Incurred Due to Public Health Interventions in the Infectious Disease Context.Søren Holm - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (Suppl 1):32-46.
    This paper develops a general approach to how society should compensate for losses that individuals incur due to public health interventions aimed at controlling the spread of infectious diseases. The paper falls in three parts. The first part provides an initial introduction to the issues and briefly outlines five different kinds of public health interventions that will be used as test cases. They are all directed at individuals and aimed at controlling the spread of infectious diseases isolation, quarantine, recommended voluntary (...)
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  • Applying a Precautionary Approach to Mobile Contact Tracing for COVID-19: The Value of Reversibility.Niels Nijsingh, Anne van Bergen & Verina Wild - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):823-827.
    The COVID-19 pandemic presents unprecedented challenges to public health decision-making. Specifically, the lack of evidence and the urgency with which a response is called for, raise the ethical challenge of assessing how much evidence is required for the justification of interventions in response to the various threats we face. Here we discuss the intervention of introducing technology that aims to trace and alert contacts of infected persons—contact tracing technology. Determining whether such an intervention is proportional is complicated by complex trade-offs (...)
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  • Health Communication, Public Mistrust, and the Politics of “Rationality”.Sara M. Bergstresser - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):57-59.
  • Public Health and Legitimacy: Or Why There is Still a Place for Substantive Work in Ethics.A. Dawson & M. F. Verweij - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):95-97.
  • Ethics of Selective Restriction of Liberty in a Pandemic.James Cameron, Bridget Williams, Romain Ragonnet, Ben Marais, James Trauer & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (8):553-562.
    Liberty-restricting measures have been implemented for centuries to limit the spread of infectious diseases. This article considers if and when it may be ethically acceptable to impose selective liberty-restricting measures in order to reduce the negative impacts of a pandemic by preventing particularly vulnerable groups of the community from contracting the disease. We argue that the commonly accepted explanation—that liberty restrictions may be justified to prevent harm to others when this is the least restrictive option—fails to adequately accommodate the complexity (...)
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  • Public Engagement on Social Distancing in a Pandemic: A Canadian Perspective.Joint Centre for Bioethics Pandemic Ethics Working Group - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):15-17.
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  • Screening for Infectious Diseases of Asylum Seekers Upon Arrival: The Necessity of the Moral Principle of Reciprocity.Dorien T. Beeres, Darren Cornish, Machiel Vonk, Sofanne J. Ravensbergen, Els L. M. Maeckelberghe, Pieter Boele Van Hensbroek & Ymkje Stienstra - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):16.
    With a large number of forcibly displaced people seeking safety, the EU is facing a challenge in maintaining solidarity. Europe has seen millions of asylum seekers crossing European borders, the largest number of asylum seekers since the second world war. Endemic diseases and often failing health systems in their countries of origin, and arduous conditions during transit, raise questions around how to meet the health needs of this vulnerable population on arrival in terms of screening, vaccination, and access to timely (...)
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  • Infection Control Measures and Debts of Gratitude.Diego S. Silva & A. M. Viens - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):55-57.
  • Does Population Health Have an Intrinsically Distributional Dimension?Lynette Reid - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):24-36.
    Verweij and Dawson claim that population health has a distributive dimension; Coggon argues that this presupposes a normative commitment to equity in the very definition of population health, which should, rather, be neutral. I describe possible sources of the distributive view, several of which do not presuppose egalitarian commitments. Two relate to the nature of health as a property of individuals ; two relate to the epistemology and pragmatics of public and population health. A fifth source of the distributive view (...)
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  • Smoking Bans and Persons with Schizophrenia: A Straightforward Use of the Harm Principle?D. S. Silva - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (2):143-148.
    Indoor smoking bans in public places is usually held as a simple and straightforward example of the application of the harm principle in public health. However, implementing indoor smoking bans in mental health centres is difficult because of the potential neurological and social benefits of smoking for persons with schizophrenia, as suggested by some empirical studies. In this article, the ethical challenges related to smoking bans in mental health centres as justified by the harm principle are explored. Particular attention is (...)
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  • Reciprocity and Ethical Tuberculosis Treatment and Control.Diego S. Silva, Angus Dawson & Ross E. G. Upshur - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (1):75-86.
    This paper explores the notion of reciprocity in the context of active pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis treatment and related control policies and practices. We seek to do three things: First, we sketch the background to contemporary global TB care and suggest that poverty is a key feature when considering the treatment of TB patients. We use two examples from TB care to explore the role of reciprocity: isolation and the use of novel TB drugs. Second, we explore alternative means of (...)
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  • Listen! The Value of Public Engagement in Pandemic Ethics.J. Eline Garrett, Dorothy Vawter, Angela Witt Prehn, Debra DeBruin & Karen Gervais - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):17-19.
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  • The Role of Socially Embedded Concepts in Breast Cancer Screening: An Empirical Study with Australian Experts.Lisa M. Parker & Stacy M. Carter - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):276-289.
    It is not clear whether breast cancer screening is a public health intervention or an individual clinical service. The question is important because the concepts best suited for ethical reasoning in public health might be different to the concepts commonly employed in biomedical ethics. We consider it likely that breast screening has elements of a public health intervention and used an empirical ethics approach to explore this further. If breast screening has public health characteristics, it is probable that policy and (...)
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  • Public Engagement on Social Distancing in a Pandemic: A Canadian Perspective.Joint Centre for Bioethics Pandemic - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):15-17.
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