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  1. Consensus, Caring and Community:: An Inquiry Into Dialogue.S. Davey - 2004 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 25 (1):18-51.
  • Between Banality and Radicality: Arendt and Kant on Evil and Responsibility.Javier Burdman - 2019 - European Journal of Political Theory 18 (2):174-194.
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  • Violence, Law, and Politics: Hannah Arendt and Robert M. Cover in Comparative Perspective.Douglas B. Klusmeyer - 2015 - Criminal Justice Ethics 34 (3):312-337.
  • On Visibility and Power: An Arendtian Corrective of Foucault. [REVIEW]Neve Gordon - 2002 - Human Studies 25 (2):125-145.
    Freedom, conceived ontologically, is power's condition of possibility. Yet, considering that the subject's interests and identity are constantly shaped, one still has to explain how – theoretically speaking – individuals can resist control. This is precisely the issue I address in the following pages. Following a brief overview of Foucault's contribution to our understanding of power, I turn to discuss the role of visibility vis-à-vis control, and show how the development of disciplinary techniques reversed the visibility of power. While Foucault (...)
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  • Atavistic Novelty: Questioning Hannah Arendt’s Understanding of Totalitarianism.Milen Jissov - forthcoming - The European Legacy:1-24.
    ABSTRACTThis article offers a critique of Hannah Arendt’s interpretation of totalitarianism as formulated in her magnum opus—The Origins of Totalitarianism. It argues that, to comprehend totalitarianism, Arendt forged a heterodox method of historical analysis. Employing that method, she conceived totalitarianism as a form of transcendence of historical context. In doing so, however, she ignored crucial historical contexts that were in fact related to the history of totalitarianism. Subverting her interpretation of totalitarianism as transcendence, these elided contexts erupted inadvertently and repeatedly (...)
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  • Reclaiming the Revolutionary Spirit.William Smith - 2010 - European Journal of Political Theory 9 (2):149-166.
    This article examines Hannah Arendt’s bold and provocative proposal to institutionalize civil disobedience. First, I argue that the proposal follows from Arendt’s peculiar interpretation of this mode of protest. She sees it as an unexpected yet welcome echo of the revolutionary spirit that accompanied the foundation of the American republic. In seeking to bring civil disobedience into government, she aims to embed this spirit within the very institutional fabric of the polity. Second, I suggest that we have strong reasons to (...)
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  • Another Origin of Totalitarianism: Arendt on the Loneliness of Liberal Citizens.Jennifer Gaffney - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (1):1-17.
    ABSTRACTThis paper examines Hannah Arendt's notion of citizenship with reference to her account of loneliness in the modern age. Whereas recent scholarship has emphasized Arendt's notion of the “right to have rights” in order to advance her conception of citizenship in the context of global democratic theory, I maintain that this discourse threatens to overshadow the depth of her critical relation to the liberal tradition. By turning to loneliness, I aim to show that Arendt's understanding of citizenship guides a prescient (...)
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  • Language and Loneliness: Arendt, Cavell, and Modernity.Martin Shuster - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (4):473-497.
    Abstract Many have been struck by Hannah Arendt?s remarks on loneliness in the concluding pages of The Origins of Totalitarianism, but very few have attempted to deal with the remarks in any systematic way. What is especially striking about this state of affairs is that the remarks are crucial to the account contained therein, as they betray a view of agency that undergirds the rest of the account. This article develops Arendt?s thinking on loneliness throughout her corpus, showing how loneliness (...)
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  • Towards an Analytics of Mediation.Lilie Chouliaraki - 2006 - Critical Discourse Studies 3 (2):153-178.
    In this paper I discuss a framework for the analysis of media discourse – the ‘analytics of mediation’ – that takes into account the embeddedness of media texts both in technological artefacts and in social relationships and, hence, seeks to integrate the multi-modal with the critical analysis of discourse. On the methodological level, the analytics of mediation applies a multi-modal discourse analysis onto media texts in order to study their visual and linguistic properties: camera/visual; graphic/pictorial or aural/linguistic. On the social (...)
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  • Agonistic Recognition in Education: On Arendt’s Qualification of Political and Moral Meaning.Carsten Ljunggren - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (1):19-33.
  • Between Banality and Radicality: Arendt and Kant on Evil and Responsibility.Javier Burdman - 2016 - European Journal of Political Theory 18 (2):147488511664072.
    The paper reads Kant’s notion of radical evil as anticipating and clarifying problematic aspects of what Arendt called ‘the banality of evil’. By reconstructing Arendt’s varied analyses of this notion throughout her later writings, I show that the main theoretical challenge posed by it concerns the adjudication of responsibility for evil deeds that seem to lack recognisable evil intentions. In order to clarify this issue, I turn to a canonical text in which the relationship between evil and responsibility plays a (...)
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  • Hope and Memory in the Thought of Judith Shklar.Katrina Forrester - 2011 - Modern Intellectual History 8 (3):591-620.
    Current interpretations of the political theory of Judith Shklar focus to a disabling extent on her short, late article (1989); commentators take this late essay as representative of her work as a whole and thus characterize her as an anti-totalitarian, Cold War liberal. Other interpretations situate her political thought alongside followers of John Rawls and liberal political philosophy. Challenging the centrality of fear in Shklar's thought, this essay examines her writings on utopian and normative thought, the role of history in (...)
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  • Contingency of action, spatiality of conflict. Encounters and disagreements between Arendt and Merleau-Ponty.Diego Paredes Goicochea - 2017 - Las Torres de Lucca: Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política 6 (10):51-73.
    The purpose of this article is to discuss the connection between Arendt and Merleau-Ponty’s political thought based on the relation between the contingency of action and the spatiality of conflict. Even though the shared concern for developing a phenomenology of action institutes a common ground between their theories, I intend to show that there are significant philosophical differences when it comes to their understanding of conflict and the space in which it unfolds. Although both authors approach the question of action (...)
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  • Agonism and Deliberation— Recognizing the Difference.Fuat Gürsözlü - 2009 - Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (3):356-368.
  • The Relevance of Hannah Arendt’s Reflections on Evil: Globalization and Rightlessness. [REVIEW]Patrick Hayden - 2010 - Human Rights Review 11 (4):451-467.
    The centenary of Hannah Arendt’s birth in 2006 has provided the catalyst for a body of literature grappling with the legacy of her thought, especially the question of its enduring political relevance. Yet this literature largely excludes from consideration a significant aspect of Arendt’s legacy, namely, her account of evil and its devastating political reality. This article contends that the neglect of Arendt’s understanding of the dynamic reality of evil unnecessarily delimits the opportunities her legacy affords to diagnose forms of (...)
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  • The Human Condition as Social Ontology: Hannah Arendt on Society, Action and Knowledge.Philip Walsh - 2011 - History of the Human Sciences 24 (2):120-137.
    Hannah Arendt is widely regarded as a political theorist who sought to rescue politics from ‘society’, and political theory from the social sciences. This conventional view has had the effect of distracting attention from many of Arendt’s most important insights concerning the constitution of ‘society’ and the significance of the social sciences. In this article, I argue that Hannah Arendt’s distinctions between labor, work and action, as these are discussed in The Human Condition and elsewhere, are best understood as a (...)
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  • Toward an Agonistic Understanding of Law: Law and Politics in Hannah Arendt's Eichmann in Jerusalem.Lida Maxwell - 2012 - Contemporary Political Theory 11 (1):88-108.
  • Hannah Arendt: The Risks of the Public Realm.Elizabeth Frazer - 2009 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (2):203-223.
  • Coming Out of Hiding: Hannah Arendt on Thinking in Dark Times.Steve Buckler - 2001 - The European Legacy 6 (5):615-631.
  • Rethinking International History, Theory and the Event with Hannah Arendt.Alexander D. Barder & David M. McCourt - 2010 - Journal of International Political Theory 6 (2):117-141.
    This paper reconsiders the event in International Relations through the writings of Hannah Arendt. The event has for too long been neglected in IR; international events are overwhelmingly conceived as mere happenings that have meaning only within the process and temporal structure of the theory from which they are understood, and as holding no or only limited meaning in and of themselves. In her work on political theory and her reflections on totalitarianism, however, Arendt elaborates a rich view of the (...)
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  • Blending Arendtian Exemplarity with Weberian Ideal-Typic Analysis: Arendt’s ‘Socrates’ as a Vehicle for Social Critique.Aaron Jaffe - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (3):375-394.
    Arendt uses the exemplary validity of Socrates to think and value the possibilities of joint philosophical and political orientations in our present juncture. In this way Arendt’s ‘Socrates’ is not a mythic, historic, or dramatic individual, but offers an example of the best of the human condition. Unfortunately, because Arendt held the social conditioning and constraining of Socrates’ possibilities at arm’s length, his status as an exemplar is problematic and he ends up referring to a historical rather than contemporary possibilities. (...)
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  • Why Do We Need to Create a Moral Image of the World?María Pía Lara - 2007 - Thesis Eleven 91 (1):6-26.
    This article deals with our constructed notions of evil and how an historical appraisal takes shape after specific stories and narratives become important objects of public deliberation, historical criticism, and disclosive views of what constitutes the moral harms of human cruelty. I analyze the historical representations of the meaning of evil in specific historical times through narratives that have made important contributions to our historical understanding of them. I also propose that our learning from them is the result of public (...)
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  • Hannah Arendt on Conscience and Evil.Arne Johan Vetlesen - 2001 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (5):1-33.
    Though there exists a vast literature dealing with Hannah Arendt's thoughts on evil in general and Adolf Eichmann in particular, few attempts have been made to assess Arendt's position on evil by tracing its connection with her reflections on conscience. This essay examines the nature and significance of such a connection. Beginning with her doctoral dissertation on St Augustine and ending with her posthumously published studies in The Life of the Mind, Arendt's oeuvre exhibits strong thematic continuity: the triad thinking-conscience-evil (...)
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