Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. How Bad Apples Promote Bad Barrels: Unethical Leader Behavior and the Selective Attrition Effect.Robert Cialdini, Yexin Jessica Li, Adriana Samper & Ned Wellman - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    We present a theoretical rationale and supporting studies revealing how unethical leader behavior fosters an unethical climate within workgroups that increases member turnover intentions and malfeasance. Drawing on the attraction–selection–attrition model of organizational behavior, we propose a selective attrition effect whereby unethical leader behavior results in the retention of group members who are more comfortable with dishonesty and, consequently, more likely to engage in unethical behavior toward their group. In two experiments, exposure to unethical leader behavior increased group members’ likelihood (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ethical Organisational Culture as a Context for Managers' Personal Work Goals.Mari Huhtala, Taru Feldt, Katriina Hyvönen & Saija Mauno - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):265-282.
    The aims of this study were to investigate what kinds of personal work goals managers have and whether ethical organisational culture is related to these goals. The sample consisted of 811 Finnish managers from different organisations, in middle and upper management levels, aged 25–68 years. Eight work-related goal content categories were found based on the managers self-reported goals: (1) organisational goals (35.4 %), (2) competence goals (26.1 %), (3) well-being goals (12.1 %), (4) career-ending goals (7.3 %), (5) progression goals (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Improving the “Leader–Follower” Relationship: Top Manager or Supervisor? The Ethical Leadership Trickle-Down Effect on Follower Job Response.Pablo Ruiz, Carmen Ruiz & Ricardo Martínez - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):587-608.
    Since time immemorial, the phenomenon of leadership and its understanding has attracted the attention of the business world because of its important role in human groups. Nevertheless, for years efforts to understand this concept have only been centred on people in leadership roles, thus overlooking an important aspect in its understanding: the necessary moral dimension which is implicit in the relationship between leader and follower. As an illustrative example of the importance of considering good morality in leadership, an empirical study (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Positive Job Response and Ethical Job Performance.Sean Valentine, Philip Varca, Lynn Godkin & Tim Barnett - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (2):195-206.
    Although many studies have linked job attitudes and intentions to aspects of in-role and extra-role job performance, there has been relatively little attention given to such job responses in the context of employees’ ethical/unethical behavior. The purpose of this study was to investigate a possible relationship between positive job response (conceptualized as job satisfaction and intention to stay) and behavioral ethics. Ninety-two matched manager-employee pairs from a regional branch of a large financial services and banking firm completed survey instruments, with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Ethics Programs, Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Job Satisfaction.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):159 - 172.
    Companies offer ethics codes and training to increase employees’ ethical conduct. These programs can also enhance individual work attitudes because ethical organizations are typically valued. Socially responsible companies are likely viewed as ethical organizations and should therefore prompt similar employee job responses. Using survey information collected from 313 business professionals, this exploratory study proposed that perceived corporate social responsibility would mediate the positive relationships between ethics codes/training and job satisfaction. Results indicated that corporate social responsibility fully or partially mediated the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  • Understanding Pay Satisfaction: Effects of Supervisor Ethical Leadership on Job Motivating Potential Influence.Pablo Ruiz-Palomino, Francisco J. Sáez-Martínez & Ricardo Martínez-Cañas - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):31-43.
    Traditionally, research focused on determining the causes of employee pay satisfaction has investigated the influence of job-related inputs, both extrinsic and intrinsic to the job itself. Together with these inputs, pay-related fairness issues have played an important role in explaining the phenomenon. However, few studies consider the factors linked to fairness issues, such as ethical leadership. Because ethical leadership necessarily entails the concept of fairness, it seemingly should have a positive effect. Furthermore, because the presence of supervisor ethical leadership (SEL) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Impact of Perceived Organizational Ethical Climate on Work Satisfaction.Meral Elçi & Lütfihak Alpkan - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):297-311.
    This empirical study investigates the effects of nine ethical climate types (self-interest, company profit, efficiency, friendship, team interest, social responsibility, personal morality, company rules and procedures, and lastly laws and professional codes) on employee work satisfaction. The ethical climate typology developed by Victor and Cullen (in W. C. Frederick (ed.) Research in Corporate Social Performance and Policy, 1987; Administrative Science Quarterly 33, 101–125, 1988) is tested on a sample of staff and managers from 62 different telecommunication firms in Turkey. The (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • The Methodology in Empirical Sales Ethics Research: 1980–2010.Nicholas McClaren - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (1):121-147.
    The study examines the research methodology of more than 200 empirical investigations of ethics in personal selling and sales management between 1980 and 2010. The review discusses the sources and authorship of the sales ethics research. To better understand the drivers of empirical sales ethics research, the foundations used in business, marketing, and sales ethics are compared. The use of hypotheses, operationalization, measurement, population and sampling decisions, research design, and statistical analysis techniques were examined as part of theory development and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Professional Ethical Standards, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):657-666.
    This study explored several proposed relationships among professional ethical standards, corporate social responsibility, and the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility. Data were collected from 313 business managers registered with a large professional research association with a mailed self-report questionnaire. Mediated regression analysis indicated that perceptions of corporate social responsibility partially mediated the positive relationship between perceived professional ethical standards and the believed importance of ethics and social responsibility. Perceptions of corporate social responsibility also fully mediated the negative relationship (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • The Impact of Emotional Intelligence, Organizational Commitment, and Job Satisfaction on Ethical Behavior of Chinese Employees.Weihui Fu - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (1):137-144.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Prediction of Whistleblowing or Non-Reporting Observation: The Role of Personal and Situational Factors. [REVIEW]P. G. Cassematis & R. Wortley - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):615-634.
    This study examined whether it was possible to classify Australian public sector employees as either whistleblowers or non-reporting observers using personal and situational variables. The personal variables were demography (gender, public sector tenure, organisational tenure and age), work attitudes (job satisfaction, trust in management, whistleblowing propensity) and employee behaviour (organisational citizenship behaviour). The situational variables were perceived personal victimisation, fear of reprisals and perceived wrongdoing seriousness. These variables were used as predictors in a series of binary logistic regressions. It was (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • The Impact of Moral Stress Compared to Other Stressors on Employee Fatigue, Job Satisfaction, and Turnover: An Empirical Investigation. [REVIEW]Kristen Bell DeTienne, Bradley R. Agle, James C. Phillips & Marc-Charles Ingerson - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):377-391.
    Moral stress is an increasingly significant concept in business ethics and the workplace environment. This study compares the impact of moral stress with other job stressors on three important employee variables—fatigue, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions—by utilizing survey data from 305 customer-contact employees of a financial institution’s call center. Statistical analysis on the interaction of moral stress and the three employee variables was performed while controlling for other types of job stress as well as demographic variables. The results reveal that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Corporate Ethical Values, Group Creativity, Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention: The Impact of Work Context on Work Response. [REVIEW]Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin, Gary M. Fleischman & Roland Kidwell - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):353 - 372.
    A corporate culture strengthened by ethical values and other positive business practices likely yields more favorable employee work responses. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which perceived corporate ethical values work in concert with group creativity to influence both job satisfaction and turnover intention. Using a self-report questionnaire, information was collected from 781 healthcare and administrative employees working at a multi-campus education-based healthcare organization. Additional survey data was collected from a comparative convenience sample of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Ethical Context and Ethical Decision Making: Examination of an Alternative Statistical Approach for Identifying Variable Relationships.Sean Valentine, Seong-Hyun Nam, David Hollingworth & Callie Hall - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (3):509-526.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Measuring and Differentiating Perceptions of Supervisor and Top Leader Ethics.Janet L. Kottke & Kathie L. Pelletier - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):415-428.
    We report the results of two studies that evaluated the perceptions of supervisor and top leader ethics. In our first study, we re-analyzed data from Pelletier and Bligh (J Bus Ethics 67:359–374, 2006) and found that the Perceptions of Ethical Leadership Scale from that study could be used to differentiate perceptions of supervisor and top leader ethics. In a second study with a different sample, we examined the relationships between (1) individual employees’ perceptions of top managers’ and immediate supervisors’ ethical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Corporate Ethical Values and Altruism: The Mediating Role of Career Satisfaction. [REVIEW]Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin, Gary M. Fleischman, Roland E. Kidwell & Karen Page - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):509-523.
    This study explores the ability of career satisfaction to mediate the relationship between corporate ethical values and altruism. Using a sample of individuals employed in a four-campus, regional health science center, it was determined that individual career satisfaction fully mediated the positive relationship between perceptions of corporate ethical values and self-reported altruism. The findings imply that companies dedicating attention to positive corporate ethical values can enhance employee attitudes and altruistic behaviors, especially when individuals experience a high degree of career satisfaction.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Strengthening Customer Value Development and Ethical Intent in the Salesforce: The Influence of Ethical Values Person–Organization Fit and Trust in Manager.Charles H. Schwepker - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-13.
    This research seeks to better understand how an organization-related employee perception and job attitude may influence organizational members to ethically create customer value. Specifically, it is proposed that high person–organization fit perception, more precisely ethical values person–organization fit perception, can influence business-to-business salesperson commitment to providing superior customer value both directly and indirectly through trust in sales manager, while encouraging ethical salesforce behavior, an important aspect of communicating and delivering customer value. Results from a study of 408 business-to-business salespeople find (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ethical Culture and Employee Outcomes: The Mediating Role of Person-Organization Fit. [REVIEW]Pablo Ruiz-Palomino, Ricardo Martínez-Cañas & Joan Fontrodona - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):173-188.
    We build on limited research concerning the mediation processes associated with the relationship between ethical culture and employee outcomes. A multidimensional measure of ethical culture was examined for its relationship to overall Person-Organization (P–O) fit and employee response, using a sample of 436 employees from social economy and commercial banks in Spain. In line with previous research involving unidimensional measures, ethical culture was found to relate positively to employee job satisfaction, affective commitment, and intention to stay. New to the literature, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Ethics and Well-Being: The Paradoxical Implications of Individual Differences in Ethical Orientation.Robert A. Giacalone, Carole L. Jurkiewicz & Mark Promislo - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (3):491-506.
    Following on theoretical work and studies that assert a relationship between unethical activities and diminished well-being, and a common belief that those more ethically inclined experience greater well-being, the present study examined whether individual differences in ethical orientation may be associated with the experience of well-being. This paper reports the findings of two separate studies showing that individual differences in moral attentiveness, moral identity, idealism, relativism, and integrity were associated with differences in a wide range of well-being measures. Of particular (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Effects of Ethical Leadership and Ethical Climate on Employee Ethical Behavior in the International Port Context.Chin-Shan Lu & Chi-Chang Lin - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (2):209-223.
  • The Effects of the Perceived Behavioral Integrity of Managers on Employee Attitudes: A Meta-Analysis.Anne L. Davis & Hannah R. Rothstein - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 67 (4):407-419.
    Perceived behavioral integrity involves the employee’s perception of the alignment of the manager’s words and deeds. This meta-analysis examined the relationship between perceived behavioral integrity of managers and the employee attitudes of job satisfaction, organizational commitment, satisfaction with the leader and affect toward the organization. Results indicate a strong positive relationship overall (average r = 0.48, p<0.01). With only 12 studies included, exploration of moderators was limited, but preliminary analysis suggested that the gender of the employees and the number of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Ethics Programs, Perceived Corporate Social Responsibility and Job Satisfaction.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):159-172.
    Companies offer ethics codes and training to increase employees' ethical conduct. These programs can also enhance individual work attitudes because ethical organizations are typically valued. Socially responsible companies are likely viewed as ethical organizations and should therefore prompt similar employee job responses. Using survey information collected from 313 business professionals, this exploratory study proposed that perceived corporate social responsibility would mediate the positive relationships between ethics codes/training and job satisfaction. Results indicated that corporate social responsibility fully or partially mediated the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  • Ethical Purchasing Dissonance: Antecedents and Coping Behaviors.Tim Reilly, Amit Saini & Jenifer Skiba - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-21.
    The pressure of oversight and scrutiny in the business-to-business purchasing process has the potential to cause psychological distress in purchasing professionals, giving rise to apprehensions about being ethically inappropriate. Utilizing depth interviews with public sector purchasing professionals in a phenomenological approach, the authors develop the notion of ethical purchasing dissonance to explain the psychological distress. An inductively derived conceptual framework is presented for ethical purchasing dissonance that explores its potential antecedents and consequences; illustrative propositions are presented, and managerial implications are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Comparative Study of Ethical Perceptions of Managers and Non–Managers.Noel Y. M. Siu & Kit-Chun Joanna Lam - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):167 - 183.
    This study provides a comparison of the ethical perceptions of managers and non-managers, including professionals, teachers, sales persons and clerks, as well as technical and plant workers. Data of working individuals were collected in Hong Kong in the form of questionnaires which contain vignettes of questionable ethical issues. Factor analysis was used to identify the major ethical dimensions which were then used as the basis of comparison. Regression analyses were used to study the effect of various variables on ethical perceptions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Ethics Training and Businesspersons? Perceptions of Organizational Ethics.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 52 (4):391-400.
    Ethics training is commonly cited as a primary method for increasing employees' ethical decision making and conduct. However, little is known about how the presence of ethics training can enhance other components of an organization's ethical environment such as employees' perception of company ethical values. Using a national sample of 313 business professionals employed in the United States, the relationship between ethics training and perceived organizational ethics was explored. The results of the analysis provide significant statistical support for the notion (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  • A Comparative Study of Ethical Perceptions of Managers and Non-Managers.Noel Y. M. Siu & Kit-Chun Joanna Lam - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):167-183.
    This study provides a comparison of the ethical perceptions of managers and non-managers, including professionals, teachers, sales persons and clerks, as well as technical and plant workers. Data of working individuals were collected in Hong Kong in the form of questionnaires which contain vignettes of questionable ethical issues. Factor analysis was used to identify the major ethical dimensions which were then used as the basis of comparison. Regression analyses were used to study the effect of various variables on ethical perceptions (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Role Conflict, Mindfulness, and Organizational Ethics in an Education-Based Healthcare Institution.Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin & Philip E. Varca - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (3):455 - 469.
    Role conflict occurs when a job possesses inconsistent expectations incongruent with individual beliefs, a situation that precipitates considerable frustration and other negative work outcomes. Increasing interest in processes that reduce role conflict is, therefore, witnessed. With the help of information collected from a large sample of individuals employed at an education-based healthcare institution, this study identified several factors that might decrease role conflict, namely mindfulness and organizational ethics. In particular, the results indicated that mindfulness was associated with decreased role conflict, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Ethics Training and Businesspersons' Perceptions of Organizational Ethics.Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 52 (4):381 - 390.
    Ethics training is commonly cited as a primary method for increasing employees ethical decision making and conduct. However, little is known about how the presence of ethics training can enhance other components of an organization's ethical environment such as employees perception of company ethical values. Using a national sample of 313 business professionals employed in the United States, the relationship between ethics training and perceived organizational ethics was explored. The results of the analysis provide significant statistical support for the notion (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations