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  1. Relationship Commitment and Ethical Consumer Behavior in a Retail Setting: The Case of Receiving Too Much Change at the Checkout.Sarah Steenhaut & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (4):335 - 353.
    In this study, we conducted two experiments to examine the effect of relationship commitment on the reaction of shoppers to receiving too much change, controlling for the amount of excess change. Hypotheses based on equity theory, opportunism and guilt were set up and tested. The first study showed that, when the less committed consumer is confronted with a large excess of change, he/she is less likely to report this mistake, compared with a small excess. Conversely, consumers with a high commitment (...)
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  • The Mediating Role of Anticipated Guilt in Consumers' Ethical Decision-Making.Sarah Steenhaut & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (3):269 - 288.
    In this paper, we theorize that the anticipation of guilt plays an important role in ethically questionable consumer situations. We propose an ethical decision-making framework incorporating anticipated guilt as partial mediator between consumers' ethical beliefs (anteceded by ethical ideology) and intentions. In the first study, we compared several models using structural equation modeling and found empirical support for our research model. A second experiment was set up to illustrate how these new insights may be applied to prevent consumers from taking (...)
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  • An Empirical Investigation of the Relationships Among a Consumer’s Personal Values, Ethical Ideology and Ethical Beliefs.Sarah Steenhaut & Patrick van Kenhove - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):137 - 155.
    This study provides an additional partial test of the Hunt-Vitell theory [1986, Journal of Macro-marketing, 8, 5-16; 1993, 'The General Theory of Marketing Ethics: A Retrospective and Revision', in N. C. Smith and J. A. Quelch (eds.), Ethics in Marketing (Irwin Inc., Homewood), pp. 775-784], within the consumer ethics context. Using structural equation modeling, the relationships among an individual's personal values (conceptualized by the typology of Schwartz [1992, 'Universals in the Content and Structure of Values: Theoretical Advances and Empirical Tests (...)
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  • Why Ethical Consumers Don’T Walk Their Talk: Towards a Framework for Understanding the Gap Between the Ethical Purchase Intentions and Actual Buying Behaviour of Ethically Minded Consumers.Michal J. Carrington, Benjamin A. Neville & Gregory J. Whitwell - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):139-158.
    Despite their ethical intentions, ethically minded consumers rarely purchase ethical products (Auger and Devinney: 2007, Journal of Business Ethics 76, 361-383). This intentions-behaviour gap is important to researchers and industry, yet poorly understood (Belk et al.: 2005, Consumption, Markets and Culture 8(3), 275-289). In order to push the understanding of ethical consumption forward, we draw on what is known about the intention— behaviour gap from the social psychology and consumer behaviour literatures and apply these insights to ethical consumerism. We bring (...)
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  • Consumer Ethics: The Role of Self-Regulatory Focus.Tine De Bock & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):241 - 255.
    The present study investigates the influence of self-regulatory focus on consumer ethical beliefs (i.e., consumers' judgment of various unethical consumer practices). The self-regulatory focus framework is highly influential and applies to an impressively wide spectrum of topics across a diverse array of domains. However, previous research has not yet examined the link between this personality construct and the consumer ethics field. Findings indicate that promotion affects one's attitude toward questionable consumer practices with those having a stronger (versus weaker) promotion focus (...)
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  • Double Standards: The Role of Techniques of Neutralization.Tine De Bock & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):283 - 296.
    Despite the growing number of studies examining consumers' perceptions of unethical corporate and consumer practices, research examining the apparent double standard existing between what consumers perceive as acceptable corporate behaviour and what they believe are acceptable consumer practices remains scarce. Contradictory, double standards are often quoted by other researchers as a major stream in ethical literature.The few studies dealing with this topic as well as this study indicate that people rate corporate unethical actions as less admissible compared to similar consumer (...)
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  • Investigating the Effects of Gender on Consumers’ Moral Philosophies and Ethical Intentions.Connie R. Bateman & Sean R. Valentine - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):393-414.
    Using information collected from a convenience sample of graduate and undergraduate students affiliated with a Midwestern university in the United States, this study determined the extent to which gender is related to consumers’ moral philosophies and ethical intentions. Multivariate and univariate results indicated that women were more inclined than men to utilize both consequence-based and rule-based moral philosophies in questionable consumption situations. In addition, women placed more importance on an overall moral philosophy than did men, and women had higher intentions (...)
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  • The Role of Cultural Attributes on Consumer Ethics: Does It Matter?Denni Arli & Andre Pekerti - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 13:19-40.
    The total number of international migrants has increased significantly in the last 10 years such that people are faced with various ethical situations in their new host country, which challenge their previous moral philosophies. Studies have found that culture is one of the most important variables influencing ethical decision-making. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of self-concept and cultural intelligence on consumer ethics in two cultures, Australia and Indonesia. With a total sample of 1,142 respondents, the (...)
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  • How Does Past Behaviour Stimulate Consumers' Intentions to Repeat Unethical Behaviour? The Roles of Perceived Risk and Ethical Beliefs.BaoChun Zhao, Mohammed Yahya Rawwas & ChengHao Zeng - forthcoming - Business Ethics: A European Review.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  • Understanding Insurance Customer Dishonesty: Outline of a Situational Approach.Johannes Brinkmann - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (2):183-197.
    The paper takes a look at insurance customer dishonesty as a special case of consumer ethics, understood as a way of situation handling, as a moral choice between right and wrong, such as between self-interest vs. common-interest, in other words, a “moral temptation”. After briefly raising the question if different schools, of moral philosophy would conceptualize such moral temptations differently, the paper presents ‘moral psychology’ as a frame of reference, with a focus on cognitive moral development, moral attitude and moral (...)
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  • Anomie and the Marketing Function: The Role of Control Mechanisms.Jean L. Johnson, Mike Krush & Amit Saini - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):863-863.
    The authors use the theoretical notion of anomie to examine the impact of top management’s control mechanisms on the environment of the marketing function. Based on a literature review and in-depth field interviews with marketing managers in diverse industries, a conceptual model is proposed that incorporates the two managerial control mechanisms, viz. output and process control, and relates their distinctive influence to anomie in the marketing function. Three contingency variables, i.e., resource scarcity, power, and ethics codification, are proposed to moderate (...)
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  • Who Approves Fraudulence? Configurational Causes of Consumers’ Unethical Judgments.Arch Woodside & Alexander Leischnig - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (3):713-726.
    Corrupt behavior presents major challenges for organizations in a wide range of settings. This article embraces a complexity theoretical perspective to elucidate the causal patterns of factors underlying consumers’ unethical judgments. This study examines how causal conditions of four distinct domains combine into configurational causes of unethical judgments of two frequent forms of corrupt consumer behavior: shoplifting and fare dodging. The findings of fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analyses indicate alternative, consistently sufficient “recipes” for the outcomes of interest. This study extends prior (...)
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  • Does Fair Trade Breed Contempt? A Cross-Country Examination on the Moderating Role of Brand Familiarity and Consumer Expertise on Product Evaluation.Sofia Villas-Boas, Rita Coelho do Vale & Vera Herédia-Colaço - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (3):737-758.
    This article is a within- and cross-country examination of the impact of fair trade certification on consumers’ evaluations and attitudes toward ethically certified products. Across three experimental studies, the authors analyze how different levels of brand familiarity and fair trade expertise impact consumer decisions. The authors study this phenomenon across markets with different social orientation cultures to analyze potential dissimilarities in the way consumers evaluate and behave toward ethically certified products. Findings suggest that fair trade certifications enhance product valuations. However, (...)
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  • The Impacts of Ethical Ideology, Materialism, and Selected Demographics on Consumer Ethics: An Empirical Study in China.Chun-Chen Huang, Long-Chuan Lu, Ching-Sing You & Szu-Wei Yen - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (4):315 - 331.
    This study attempts to investigate the relationships among the ethical beliefs of Chinese consumers and orientations based on attitudinal attributes: materialism and moral philosophies (idealism and relativism). In addition, this study examines Chinese consumers' ethical beliefs in relation to five selected demographic characteristics (gender, age, religion, family income and education). Based on this exploratory study of 284 Chinese consumers, the following statistically significant findings were discovered. First, Chinese consumers regard that a passively benefiting activity is more ethical, but actively benefiting (...)
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  • Mapping Ethical Consumer Behavior: Integrating the Empirical Research and Identifying Future Directions.Eleni Papaoikonomou, Gerard Ryan & Mireia Valverde - 2011 - Ethics and Behavior 21 (3):197 - 221.
    The concept of ?ethical consumer behavior? has gained significant attention among practitioners and academic researchers, generating increasing but disjointed knowledge on the topic. By analyzing the empirical research on ethical consumer behavior, this article provides researchers with a map to guide future research. In total, we review 80 studies. The main contributions of the article include the identification of the main trends in the ethical consumer literature and the conceptualization of ethical consumer behavior. In addition, several areas for future research (...)
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  • Evolutionary Economics, Responsible Innovation and Demand: Making a Case for the Role of Consumers.Michael P. Schlaile, Matthias Mueller, Michael Schramm & Andreas Pyka - 2018 - Philosophy of Management 17 (1):7-39.
    This paper contributes to the conceptualisation of responsible innovation by proposing an evolutionary economic approach that focuses on the role of consumers in the innovation process. After a discussion of the philosophical foundations and ethical implications of this approach, which bears an explanatory potential that has not been adequately considered in previous discussions of responsible innovation, we present a first step towards capturing the important but often neglected role of consumers in innovation processes : We propose an agent-based model that (...)
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  • Assertiveness Bias in Gender Ethics Research: Why Women Deserve the Benefit of the Doubt: Marketing and Consumer Behavior.Saar Bossuyt & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (3):727-739.
    Gender is one of the most researched and contentious topics in consumer ethics research. It is common for researchers of gender studies to presume that women are more ethical than men because of their reputation for having a selfless, sensitive nature. Nevertheless, we found evidence that women behaved less ethically than men in two field experiments testing a passive form of unethical behavior. Women benefited to a larger extent from a cashier miscalculating the bill in their favor than men. However, (...)
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  • When Lying Does Not Pay: How Experts Detect Insurance Fraud.Danielle E. Warren & Maurice E. Schweitzer - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (3):711-726.
    A growing literature has focused on understanding how to detect and deter unethical consumer behavior. In this work, we focus on a particularly important type of unethical consumer behavior, consumer insurance fraud, and we analyze a unique dataset to understand how experts investigate suspicious claims. Two separate but related literatures inform the process of investigating suspicious insurance claims. The first literature is grounded in field research and emphasizes the importance of secondary sources. The second literature is grounded in laboratory studies (...)
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  • Who Approves Fraudulence? Configurational Causes of Consumers’ Unethical Judgments.Alexander Leischnig & Arch G. Woodside - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (3):713-726.
    Corrupt behavior presents major challenges for organizations in a wide range of settings. This article embraces a complexity theoretical perspective to elucidate the causal patterns of factors underlying consumers’ unethical judgments. This study examines how causal conditions of four distinct domains combine into configurational causes of unethical judgments of two frequent forms of corrupt consumer behavior: shoplifting and fare dodging. The findings of fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analyses indicate alternative, consistently sufficient “recipes” for the outcomes of interest. This study extends prior (...)
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  • A Big-Data Approach to Understanding the Thematic Landscape of the Field of Business Ethics, 1982–2016.Ying Liu, Feng Mai & Chris MacDonald - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (1):127-150.
    This study focuses on examining the thematic landscape of the history of scholarly publication in business ethics. We analyze the titles, abstracts, full texts, and citation information of all research papers published in the field’s leading journal, the Journal of Business Ethics, from its inaugural issue in February 1982 until December 2016—a dataset that comprises 6308 articles and 42 million words. Our key method is a computational algorithm known as probabilistic topic modeling, which we use to examine objectively the field’s (...)
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  • “Yes, but This Other One Looks Better/Works Better”: How Do Consumers Respond to Trade-Offs Between Sustainability and Other Valued Attributes?Michael G. Luchs & Minu Kumar - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (3):567-584.
    Consumers are increasingly facing product evaluation and choice situations that include information about product sustainability, i.e., information about a product’s relative environmental and social impact. In many cases, consumers have to make decisions that involve a trade-off between product sustainability and other valued product attributes. Similarly, product and marketing managers need to make decisions that reflect how consumers will respond to different trade-off scenarios. In the current research, we study consumer responses across two different possible trade-off scenarios: one in which (...)
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  • Understanding Consumer’s Responses to Enterprise’s Ethical Behaviors: An Investigation in China. [REVIEW]Xinming Deng - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):159-181.
    The response of consumers to a firm’s ethical behavior and the underlying factors influencing/forming each consumer’s response outcome is analyzed in this article based on information obtained through interviews. The results indicate that, in the Chinese context, the responding outcome can be boiled down to five types, namely, resistance, questioning, indifference, praise, and support. Additionally, consumers’ responses were mainly influenced by the specific consumer’s ethical consciousness, ethical cognitive effort, perception of ethical justice, motivation judgment, institutional rationality, and corporate social responsibility–corporate (...)
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  • Managerial and Public Attitudes Toward Ethics in Marketing Research.Praveen Aggarwal, Rajiv Vaidyanathan & Stephen Castleberry - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):463-481.
    This research updates and significantly extends Akaah and Riordon’s (J Market Res 26:112–120, 1989 ) evaluation of ethical perceptions of marketing research misconduct among marketing research professionals. In addition to examining changes in perceptions toward key marketing research practices over time, we assess professionals’ judgments on the ethicality, importance, and occurrence of a variety of new marketing research ethics situations in both online and offline contexts. In a second study, we assess ethical judgments of the public at large using a (...)
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  • Ethical Consumers Among the Millennials: A Cross-National Study. [REVIEW]Tania Bucic, Jennifer Harris & Denni Arli - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):113-131.
    Using two samples drawn from contrasting developed and developing countries, this investigation considers the powerful, unique Millennial consumer group and their engagement in ethical consumerism. Specifically, this study explores the levers that promote their ethical consumption and the potential impact of country of residence on cause-related purchase decisions. Three distinct subgroups of ethical consumers emerge among Millennials, providing insight into their concerns and behaviors. Instead of being conceptualized as a single niche market, Millennials should be treated as a collection of (...)
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  • Business Unethicality as an Impediment to Consumer Trust: The Moderating Role of Demographic and Cultural Characteristics. [REVIEW]Leonidas C. Leonidou, Olga Kvasova, Constantinos N. Leonidou & Simos Chari - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):397-415.
    The article reports the findings of a study conducted among 387 consumers regarding their perceptions of the unethicality of business practices of firms and how these affect their response behavior, in terms of trust, satisfaction, and loyalty. The study confirmed that high levels of perceived corporate unethicality decrease consumer trust. This in turn reduces consumer satisfaction, which ultimately has negative effects on customer loyalty. It was also revealed that, although both consumer gender and urbanity have a moderating effect on the (...)
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  • Consumer Rights: An Assessment of Justice. [REVIEW]Gretchen Larsen & Rob Lawson - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):515-528.
    For the last 50 years the idea of consumer rights has formed an essential element in the formulation of policy to guide the workings of the marketplace. The extent and coverage of these rights has evolved and changed over time, yet there has been no comprehensive analysis as to the purpose and scope of consumer rights. In moral and ethical philosophy, rights are integrally linked to the notion of justice. By reassessing consumer rights through a justice-based framework, a number of (...)
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  • The Role of Spiritual Well-Being and Materialism in Determining Consumers' Ethical Beliefs: An Empirical Study with Australian Consumers. [REVIEW]Rafi M. M. I. Chowdhury & Mario Fernando - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):61-79.
    A survey was conducted to investigate the relationship of Australian consumers’ lived (experienced) spiritual well-being and materialism with the various dimensions of consumer ethics. Spiritual well-being is composed of four domains—personal, communal, transcendental and environmental well-being. All four domains were examined in relation to the various dimensions of consumers’ ethical beliefs (active/illegal dimension, passive dimension, active/legal dimension, ‘no harm, no foul’ dimension and ‘doing good’/recycling dimension). The results indicated that lived communal well-being was negatively related to perceptions of the active/illegal (...)
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  • Does Consumer Unethical Behavior Relate to Birthplace? Evidence From China.BaoChun Zhao & ShanShan Xu - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):475-488.
    This study explores the relationship between individual birthplace [rural birthplace (RB) and urban birthplace (UB)] and consumer unethical behavior (CUB). As a result, CUB is verified to closely relate to individual birthplace, and those new urban residents with RB are found to behave more ethically than the patrimonial urban residents with UB in CUB4 (“no harm/no foul”). This study also finds that the differentiation of CUB between two categories of consumers is correlated with the personal moral ideology or Machiavellianism (MA) (...)
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  • Ethical Consumption and New Business Models in the Food Industry. Evidence From the Eataly Case.Roberta Sebastiani, Francesca Montagnini & Daniele Dalli - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):473-488.
    Individual and collective ethical stances regarding ethical consumption and related outcomes are usually seen as both a form of concern about extant market offerings and as opportunities to develop new offerings. In this sense, demand and supply are traditionally portrayed as interacting dialectically on the basis of extant business models. In general, this perspective implicitly assumes the juxtaposition of demand side ethical stances and supply side corporate initiatives. The Eataly story describes, however, a different approach to market transformation; in this (...)
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  • The Worldwide Academic Field of Business Ethics: Scholars’ Perceptions of the Most Important Issues.Daniel Holland & Chad Albrecht - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):777-788.
    We conducted an international survey of 211 scholars with expertise in business ethics. Each respondent was asked to identify the three most important issues that business ethics academia will face in the coming decade. Using content analytic procedures, responses were categorized and analyzed for commonalities. The results suggest that the most important issues facing business ethics academia in the future will be the following: issues relating to business ethics education such as curriculum, pedagogy, faculty, and accreditation the credibility of the (...)
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  • Ethics and Expertise: A Social Networks Perspective.Seung Hwan Mark Lee - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):607-621.
    Results from three field network studies show that depending on individuals’ network positions (central or peripheral), experts and novices have varying ethical predispositions (EP). In particular, central experts (vs. peripheral experts) have higher EP, while novices in the same positions (vs. peripheral novices) have lower EP. Results demonstrate individuals’ relational-interdependent self-construal mediates these relationships. Importantly, this research suggests that the interaction between network and individual difference variables uniquely affect individuals’ ethical predisposition. Given the lack of research focus on the impact (...)
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  • Consumer Social Responsibility : Toward a Multi-Level, Multi-Agent Conceptualization of the “Other CSR”.Robert Caruana & Andreas Chatzidakis - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (4):577-592.
    Despite considerable debate as to what corporate social responsibility is, consumer social responsibility, as an important force for CSR :19–45, 2005), is a term that remains largely unexplored and under-theorized. To better conceive the role consumers play in activating CSR, this paper provides a multi-level, multi-agent conceptualization of CnSR. Integrating needs-based models of decision making with justice theory, the article interpretively develops the reasons why variously positioned agents leverage consumers as a force for corporate social responsibility. The paper theoretically expands (...)
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  • The End of Religion? Examining the Role of Religiousness, Materialism, and Long-Term Orientation on Consumer Ethics in Indonesia.Denni Arli & Fandy Tjiptono - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):1-16.
    Various studies on the impact of religiousness on consumer ethics have produced mixed results and suggested further clarification on the issue. Therefore, this article examines the effect of religiousness, materialism, and long-term orientation on consumer ethics in Indonesia. The results from 356 respondents in Indonesia, the largest Muslim population in the world, showed that intrinsic religiousness positively affected consumer ethics, while extrinsic social religiousness negatively affected consumer ethics. However, extrinsic personal religiousness did not affect consumer ethical beliefs dimensions. Unlike other (...)
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  • The Relationships of Empathy, Moral Identity and Cynicism with Consumers' Ethical Beliefs: The Mediating Role of Moral Disengagement. [REVIEW]Rafi M. M. I. Chowdhury & Mario Fernando - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (4):1-18.
    This study examines the relationships of empathy, moral identity and cynicism with the following dimensions of consumer ethics: the passive dimension (passively benefiting at the expense of the seller), the active/legal dimension (benefiting from questionable but legal actions), the ‘no harm, no foul’ dimension (actions that do not harm anyone directly but are considered unethical by some) and the ‘doing-good’/recycling dimension (pro-social actions). A survey of six hundred Australian consumers revealed that both empathy and moral identity were related to negative (...)
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  • Consumer Personality and Green Buying Intention: The Mediate Role of Consumer Ethical Beliefs.Long-Chuan Lu, Hsiu-Hua Chang & Alan Chang - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (1):205-219.
    The primary purpose of this study is to link the effects of consumer personality traits on green buying intention via the mediating variable of consumer ethical beliefs so as to extend the context of green buying intentions with consumer ethics literatures. Based on a survey of 545 Taiwanese respondents, consumer personality traits were found to significantly affect consumer ethical beliefs. The results also indicate that some dimensions of consumer ethical beliefs significantly predict consumer intention to buy green products. Generally speaking, (...)
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  • The Developmental Process of Unethical Consumer Behavior: An Investigation Grounded in China.Zhiqiang Liu, Zhilin Yang, Fue Zeng & David Waller - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (2):411-432.
    This study seeks to understand how consumers make unethical decisions and how unethical consumer behavior is formed in a relational society. By taking a relational interactive perspective and adopting a grounded theory approach, we have developed a theoretical framework for examining UCB’s developmental process in a relational society. The framework reveals 4 levels and 12 paths of UCB formation. Importantly, this study finds that UCB in a relational society is influenced by guanxi-oriented social culture so deeply that it cannot be (...)
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  • Disentangling the Effects of Perceived Deception and Anticipated Harm on Consumer Responses to Deceptive Advertising.David M. Boush, Robert Madrigal & Guang-Xin Xie - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (2):281-293.
    Previous behavioral research on advertising deception has focused on the extent to which consumers would be misled by claims and implications of advertisements. The present research examines the effect of an important, but largely neglected, dimension: the severity of anticipated harm as a result of being deceived. Two experiments disentangle the effect of anticipated harm on consumer brand attitudes and purchase intentions from that of perceived deception. Interestingly, greater harmfulness increases diagnosticity of perceived deception, which partially accounts for consumers’ negative (...)
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  • Turning Inward or Focusing Out? Navigating Theories of Interpersonal and Ethical Cognitions to Understand Ethical Decision-Making.Lumina S. Albert, Scott J. Reynolds & Bulent Turan - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):467-484.
    The literature on ethical decision-making is rooted in a cognitive perspective that emphasizes the role of moral judgment. Recent research in interpersonal dynamics, however, has suggested that ethics revolves around an individual’s perceptions and views of others. We draw from both literatures to propose and empirically examine a contingent model. We theorize that whether the individual relies on cognitions about the ethical issue or perceptions of others depends on the level of social consensus surrounding the issue. We test our hypotheses (...)
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  • A Case for Consumer Social Responsibility : Including a Selected Review of Consumer Ethics/Social Responsibility Research.Scott J. Vitell - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (4):767-774.
    The literature is replete with articles emphasizing the importance of corporate social responsibility. However, few, if any, of these articles discuss the role of the consumer in achieving corporate social responsibility. It is the premise of the current paper that it may be difficult for corporate social responsibility to succeed without the assistance of consumers. That is, for corporate social responsibility to flourish, it needs to be accompanied by consumer social responsibility. This paper examines this proposition, makes the distinction between (...)
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  • Applying Ethical Concepts to the Study of “Green” Consumer Behavior: An Analysis of Chinese Consumers' Intentions to Bring Their Own Shopping Bags.Ricky Y. K. Chan, Y. H. Wong & T. K. P. Leung - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 79 (4):469-481.
    Drawing on the general ethics and social psychology literature, this study presents a model to delineate the major factors likely to affect consumers' intentions to bring their own shopping bags when visiting a supermarket . The model is empirically validated using a survey of 250 Chinese consumers. Overall, the findings support the hypothesized direct influence of teleological evaluation and habit on BYOB intention, as well as that of deontological evaluation and teleological evaluation on ethical judgment about the BYOB practice. Teleological (...)
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  • Virtue Ethics Between East and West in Consumer Research: Review, Synthesis and Directions for Future Research.Guli-Sanam Karimova, Nils Christian Hoffmann, Ludger Heidbrink & Stefan Hoffmann - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-21.
    This literature review systematically synthesizes studies that link consumer research to differences and similarities in virtue ethics between the East and the West, with a focus on early Chinese and ancient Greek virtue ethics. These two major traditions provide principles that guide consumer behavior and thus serve as a background to comparatively explain and evaluate the ethical nature of consumer behavior in the East and the West. The paper first covers Eastern and Western theoretical and normative approaches of virtue ethics (...)
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  • The Consumers’ Emotional Dog Learns to Persuade Its Rational Tail: Toward a Social Intuitionist Framework of Ethical Consumption.Lamberto Zollo - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    Literature on consumers’ ethical decision making is rooted in a rationalist perspective that emphasizes the role of moral reasoning. However, the view of ethical consumption as a thorough rational and conscious process fails to capture important elements of human cognition, such as emotions and intuitions. Based on moral psychology and microsociology, this paper proposes a holistic and integrated framework showing how emotive and intuitive information processing may foster ethical consumption at individual and social levels. The model builds on social intuitionism (...)
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  • Catering to Otherness: Levinasian Consumer Ethics at Restaurant Day.Joel Hietanen & Antti Sihvonen - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.
    There is a rich tradition of inquiry in consumer research into how collective consumption manifests in various forms and contexts. While this literature has shown how group cohesion prescribes ethical and moral positions, our study explores how ethicality can arise from consumers and their relations in a more emergent fashion. To do so, we present a Levinasian perspective on consumer ethics through a focus on Restaurant Day, a global food carnival that is organized by consumers themselves. Our ethnographic findings highlight (...)
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  • Examining the Effects of Moral Development Level, Self-Concept, and Self-Monitoring on Consumers' Ethical Attitudes.Bahtışen Kavak, Eda Gürel, Canan Eryiğit & Öznur Özkan Tektaş - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):115 - 135.
    This study investigates the possible effects of self-concept, self-monitoring, and moral development level on dimensions of consumers' ethical attitudes. "Actively benefiting from illegal activities," "actively benefiting from deceptive practices," and "no harm/no foul 1—2" are defined by factor analysis as four dimensions of Turkish consumers' ethical attitudes. Logistic regression analysis is applied to data collected from 516 Turkish households. Results indicate that self-monitoring and moral development level predicted consumer ethics in relation to "actively benefiting from questionable practices" and "no harm/no (...)
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  • Consumer Ethics: A Cross-Cultural Study of the Ethical Beliefs of Turkish and American Consumers.Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas, Ziad Swaidan & Mine Oyman - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):183-195.
    The ethical climate in Turkey is beset by ethical problems. Bribery, environmental pollution, tax frauds, deceptive advertising, production of unsafe products, and the ethical violations that involved politicians and business professionals are just a few examples. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the ethical beliefs of American and Turkish consumers using the Ethical Position Questionnaire (EPQ) of Forsyth (1980), the Machiavellianism scale, and the Consumer Ethical Practices of Muncy and Vitell questionnaire (MVQ). A sample of 376 (...)
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  • Researcher Interaction Biases and Business Ethics Research: Respondent Reactions to Researcher Characteristics.Anthony D. Miyazaki & Kimberly A. Taylor - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):779-795.
    The potential for biased responses that occur when researchers interact with their study participants has long been of interest to both academicians and practitioners. Given the sensitive nature of the field, researcher interaction biases are of particular concern for business ethics researchers regardless of their preference for survey, experimental, or qualitative methodology. Whereas some ethics researchers may inadvertently bias data by misrecording or misinterpreting responses, other biases may occur when study participants' responses are systematically influenced by the mere introduction of (...)
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  • Consumer Ethics: The Role of Acculturation in U.S. Immigrant Populations.Ziad Swaidan, Scott J. Vitell, Gregory M. Rose & Faye W. Gilbert - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):1-16.
    This study examines the role of acculturation in shaping consumers’ views of ethics. Specifically, it examines the relationships between the desire to keep one’s original culture, the desire to adopt the host culture, and the four dimensions of the Muncy and Vitell (Journal of Business Research Ethics 24(4), 297, 1992) consumer ethics scale. Using two separate immigrant populations – one of former Middle-Eastern residents now living in the U.S. and the other of Asian immigrants in the U.S. – results indicate (...)
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  • The Muncy–Vitell Consumer Ethics Scale: A Modification and Application.Scott J. Vitell & James Muncy - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):267-275.
    This study compares college students with other adults in terms of the Muncy–Vitell (1992) consumer ethics scale. Further, the study updates the Muncy–Vitell consumer ethics scale with modifications that include rewording and the addition of new items. These new items can be grouped into three distinct categories – (1) downloading/buying counterfeit goods, (2) recycling/environmental awareness and (3) doing the right thing/doing good. The study also compares these two groups in terms of their attitude toward business. Results show that there is (...)
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  • The Role of Identity Salience in the Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Consumer Behavior.Longinos Marin, Salvador Ruiz & Alicia Rubio - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):65-78.
    Based on the assumption that consumers will reward firms for their support of social programs, many organizations have adopted corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices. Drawing on social identity theory, a model of influence of CSR on loyalty is developed and tested using a sample of real consumers. Results demonstrate that CSR initiatives are linked to stronger loyalty both because the consumer develops a more positive company evaluation, and because one identifies more strongly with the company. Moreover, identity salience is shown (...)
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  • Understanding Insurance Customer Dishonesty: Outline of a Moral-Sociological Approach. [REVIEW]Johannes Brinkmann & Patrick Lentz - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2/3):177 - 195.
    Most consumer morality studies focus on consumer immorality, i.e. different types and degrees of consumer dishonesty or deviance. This paper follows this tradition, by looking at insurance customer dishonesty. For looking at insurance customer dishonesty in a wider perspective, the paper drafts a sociology of insurance customer morality, including outlines of micro-level, meso-level and macro-level moral sociologies of insurance fraud, as well as a discussion of moral heterogeneity and a critical understanding of deviance. As a next step a few empirical (...)
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