Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Understanding Insurance Customer Dishonesty: Outline of a Situational Approach.Johannes Brinkmann - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (2):183-197.
    The paper takes a look at insurance customer dishonesty as a special case of consumer ethics, understood as a way of situation handling, as a moral choice between right and wrong, such as between self-interest vs. common-interest, in other words, a “moral temptation”. After briefly raising the question if different schools, of moral philosophy would conceptualize such moral temptations differently, the paper presents ‘moral psychology’ as a frame of reference, with a focus on cognitive moral development, moral attitude and moral (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Normalization of Questionable Behavior: An Ethical Root of the Financial Crisis in Iceland.Øyvind Kvalnes & Salvör Nordal - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    In this paper, we explore the 2008 financial crisis in Iceland through the lens of Donaldson’s concept of normalization of questionable behavior. We study the report published by the Special Investigation Commission, an investigation initiated by the Icelandic Parliament near the end of 2008. The report provides a detailed and systematic account of the processes leading up to the crisis. Our aim is to determine the extent to which the behaviors of professionals in the Icelandic financial sector can be explained (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Accounting for the Unaccountable: Biodiversity Reporting and Impression Management.Olivier Boiral - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (4):751-768.
    This paper explores the strategies organizations use to demonstrate their accountability for biodiversity and legitimize their impact in this area through the use of techniques of neutralization. Neutralization aims to manage stakeholder impressions on very socially sensitive issues. Based on the content analysis of 148 sustainability reports from mining organizations, the study sheds light on the successful use of rhetoric in reports on non-measurable and potentially unaccountable issues. Specifically, the study shows that mining organizations use four main techniques of neutralization (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Strategies for Climate Change and Impression Management: A Case Study Among Canada’s Large Industrial Emitters.David Talbot & Olivier Boiral - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):329-346.
  • Applying Ethical Theories: Interpreting and Responding to Student Plagiarism.Neil Granitz & Dana Loewy - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):293-306.
    Given the tremendous proliferation of student plagiarism involving the Internet, the purpose of this study is to determine which theory of ethical reasoning students invoke when defending their transgressions: deontology, utilitarianism, rational self-interest, Machiavellianism, cultural relativism, or situational ethics. Understanding which theory of ethical reasoning students employ is critical, as preemptive steps can be taken by faculty to counteract this reasoning and prevent plagiarism. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that unethical behavior in school can lead to unethical behavior in business; (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • An Empirical Investigation of International Marketing Ethics: Problems Encountered by Australian Firms. [REVIEW]Robert W. Armstrong - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (3):161 - 171.
    This study identifies and categorises ethical problems in terms of frequency of occurrence and importance to a sample of Australian international business managers. The study determined that the most frequently cited ethical problem is gifts/favours/entertainment and that this problem may be related to the culture where the international business is being conducted. The most important ethical problem is large-scale bribery. When the frequency of occurrence and importance means are compared in a scatter plot, cultural differences, pricing practices and questionable commissions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Beyond the Proxy Vote: Dialogues Between Shareholder Activists and Corporations.Jeanne M. Logsdon & Harry J. Van Buren - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):353 - 365.
    The popular view of shareholder activism focuses on shareholder resolutions and the shareholder vote via proxy statements at the annual meeting, which is treated as a "David vs. Goliath" showdown between the small group of socially responsible investors and the powerful corporation. This article goes beyond the popular view to examine where the real action typically occurs-in the Dialogue process where corporations and shareholder activist groups mutually agree to ongoing communications to deal with a serious social issue. Use of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Ethics and Services Marketing.Ellen J. Kennedy & Leigh Lawton - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (10):785 - 795.
    The area of services marketing is a highly crucial one for potential ethical violations. The services industry, which drives over two-thirds of our national economy, is about to experience severe changes due to increasing competition. The temptation to make ethical compromises will pose a dramatic threat to the business climate.We review conceptual approaches to the field of marketing ethics and conclude that existing models often lack an important component which affects ethical decision-making. That component includes the interorganizational variables: the primary (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Risk, Anti-Reflexivity, and Ethical Neutralization in Industrial Food Processing.Diana Stuart & Michelle R. Worosz - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):287-301.
    While innovations have fostered the mass production of food at low costs, there are externalities or side effects associated with high-volume food processing. We focus on foodborne illness linked to two commodities: ground beef and bagged salad greens. In our analysis, we draw from the concepts of risk, reflexive modernization, and techniques of ethical neutralization. For each commodity, we find that systems organized for industrial goals overlook how production models foster cross-contamination and widespread outbreaks. Responses to outbreaks tend to rely (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • It's All Fair in Love, War, and Business: Cognitive Philosophies in Ethical Decision Making. [REVIEW]Gael McDonald & Patrick C. Pak - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (9):973 - 996.
    Exploratory research was undertaken in four locations in the Asia Pacific Rim to investigate the cognitive frameworks used by managers when considering ethical business dilemmas. In addition to culture, gender and organisational dimensions were also studied. Aggregate analysis revealed no significant differences in the cognitive frameworks used by business managers in Hong Kong, Malaysia, New Zealand, and Canada. Of the eight frameworks used in the study four cognitive frameworks appeared to feature predominantly. Utilising the results of regression analysis the most (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Why People Don’T Take Their Concerns About Fair Trade to the Supermarket: The Role of Neutralisation. [REVIEW]Andreas Chatzidakis, Sally Hibbert & Andrew P. Smith - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):89 - 100.
    This article explores how neutralisation can explain people's lack of commitment to buying Fair Trade (FT) products, even when they identify FT as an ethical concern. It examines the theoretical tenets of neutralisation theory and critically assesses its applicability to the purchase of FT products. Exploratory research provides illustrative examples of neutralisation techniques being used in the FT consumer context. A conceptual framework and research propositions delineate the role of neutralisation in explaining the attitude-behaviour discrepancies evident in relation to consumers' (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Does Job Function Influence Ethical Reasoning? An Adapted Wason Task Application.David M. Wasieleski & James Weber - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):187 - 199.
    A review of extent business ethics research uncovered well over 200 published articles that investigated the role of job functions within a business organization as an explanatory factor of ethical or unethical behavior. While an important body of work, ethical breaches are often found to cut across job functions and involve multiple disciplines embedded in a business organization. This research seeks to explore a crossfunctional explanation for ethical reasoning by using an instrument new to business ethics research, the Wason selection (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Comparative Perspectives on the Ethical Orientations of Human Resources, Marketing and Finance Functional Managers.Eleanor O’Higgins & Bairbre Kelleher - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):275-288.
    The human resources profession emphasizes the personal and interpersonal aspects of work, that make it conscious of complex ethical issues in relationships in the workplace, while finance specialists are conversant with routine compliance with regulations. Marketing professionals are under pressure to produce revenue results. Thus, this research hypothesized that human resources managers would be more disapproving of unethical conduct than both finance and marketing functional managers, and that finance managers would be more disapproving than marketing managers. When asked to evaluate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Ethical Issues in the Assurance of Sustainability Reports: Perspectives From Assurance Providers.Olivier Boiral, Iñaki Heras-Saizarbitoria, Marie-Christine Brotherton & Julie Bernard - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    The objective of this paper is to investigate, through a qualitative study based on 38 semi-structured interviews with agents who provide assurance of sustainability reports, how they perceive and manage ethical issues underlying the verification of sustainability reports. Most of the ethical issues observed involve four interconnected aspects: the commercialism underlying sustainability assurance, the symbolic nature of the verification process, interdependency between auditing and consulting activities, and familiarity with the audited companies. The findings shed light on the reflexivity of assurance (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Ethical Decision-Making Processes of Information Systems Workers.David B. Paradice & Roy M. Dejoie - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (1):1 - 21.
    An empirical investigation was conducted to determine whether management information systems (MIS) majors, on average, exhibit ethical decision-making processes that differ from students in other functional business areas. The research also examined whether the existence of a computer-based information system in an ethical dilemma influences ethical desision-making processes. Although student subjects were used, the research instrument has been highly correlated with educational levels attained by adult subjects in similar studies. Thus, we feel that our results have a high likelihood of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Why People Don’T Take Their Concerns About Fair Trade to the Supermarket: The Role of Neutralisation.Andreas Chatzidakis, Sally Hibbert & Andrew P. Smith - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (1):89-100.
    This article explores how neutralisation can explain people's lack of commitment to buying Fair Trade products, even when they identify FT as an ethical concern. It examines the theoretical tenets of neutralisation theory and critically assesses its applicability to the purchase of FT products. Exploratory research provides illustrative examples of neutralisation techniques being used in the FT consumer context. A conceptual framework and research propositions delineate the role of neutralisation in explaining the attitude-behaviour discrepancies evident in relation to consumers' FT (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  • Beyond the Proxy Vote: Dialogues Between Shareholder Activists and Corporations. [REVIEW]Jeanne M. Logsdon & I. I. I. Buren - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):353-365.
    The popular view of shareholder activism focuses on shareholder resolutions and the shareholder vote via proxy statements at the annual meeting, which is treated as a “David vs. Goliath” showdown between the small group of socially responsible investors and the powerful corporation. This article goes beyond the popular view to examine where the real action typically occurs – in the Dialogue process where corporations and shareholder activist groups mutually agree to ongoing communications to deal with a serious social issue. Use (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Issues Management and Organizational Accounts: An Analysis of Corporate Responses to Accusations of Unethical Business Practices. [REVIEW]Dennis E. Garrett, Jeffrey L. Bradford, Renee A. Meyers & Joy Becker - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (7):507 - 520.
    When external groups accuse a business organization of unethical practices, managers of the accused organization usually offer a communicative response to attempt to protect their organization's public image. Even though many researchers readily concur that analysis of these communicative responses is important to our understanding of business and society conflict, few investigations have focused on developing a theoretical framework for analyzing these communicative strategies used by managers. In addition, research in this area has suffered from a lack of empirical investigation. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations