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Socrates: Ironist and Moral Philosopher

Cambridge University Press (1991)

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  1. Irony, Disruption, and Moral Imperfection.Dieter Declercq - 2020 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 23 (3-4):545-559.
    Irony has a suspicious moral reputation, especially in popular media and internet culture. Jonathan Lear introduces a proposal which challenges this suspicion and identifies irony as a means to achieve human excellence. For Lear, irony is a disruptive uncanniness which arises from a gap between aspiration and actualisation in our practical identity. According to Lear, such a disruptive experience of ironic uncanniness reorients us toward excellence, because it passionately propels us to really live up to that practical identity. However, Lear’s (...)
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  • El problema de la determinación del "saber" en diálogos tempranos de Platón.Francisco Abalo C. - 2015 - Revista de filosofía (Chile) 71:09-21.
    El siguiente trabajo se enmarca en una investigación acerca de las fuentes históricofilosóficas que dan cuenta de los fundamentos de la tendencia de la filosofía a interpretarse a sí misma como una ciencia. Hemos tomado algunos de los diálogos socráticos de Platón para pesquisar cómo opera esto ahí, cuál es su motivación última y cuál su sentido. El supuesto básico es que cabe, en algún sentido, pensar la actividad filosófica como un “saber del saber”. El hilo conductor lo constituye el (...)
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  • Plato's Project for Education in the Early Socratic Dialogues.Heather Lynne Reid - unknown
    What is the role of philosophy in education? This timeless question may best be answered by examining Plato's earliest dialogues in which he makes a case for philosophy as the centerpiece of education. I call this effort Plato's project for education and interpret the Apology, Crito, Charmides, Laches, Ion, Hippias Minor, Euthyphro, and Lysis as an integrated attempt to promote philosophy as education in ancient Athens. Plato accepted arete as the proper goal of education, but his interpretation of arete as (...)
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  • Platonic Justice and What We Mean by 'Justice'.Terry Penner - 2005 - Plato Journal 5.
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  • Elenchtike Techne, Erotike Techne: In Margine Al Carmide Platonico.Francesca Pentassuglio - 2020 - Plato Journal 20:55-66.
    The paper aims to investigate the relationship between ἐρωτικὴ τέχνη and ἐλεγκτικὴ τέχνη in Plato’s early dialogues, and especially in the Charmides, through a close exam of the role of ἀντέρως in the dialogical practice and exchanges. In the light of Socrates’ reshaping of the roles of ἐραστής and ἐρώμενος in his view of παιδεία – exemplarily shown in the Symposium – I will analyse some passages of Socrates’ conversations in the Charmides by focusing on the interaction between the one (...)
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  • Speaking in Our Own Voices: Plato's Protagoras and the Crisis of Education.James Crooks - 1994 - Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Education Society 8 (1):5-15.
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  • Humorous Relations: Attentiveness, Pleasure and Risk.Cris Mayo - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (2):1-12.
    This article focuses on the structures of humor and joke telling that require particular kinds of attentiveness and particular relationships between speaker and audience, or more specifically, between classmates. First, I will analyze the pedagogical and relational preconditions that are necessary for humor to work. If humor is to work well, the person engaging in humor needs to gauge their interlocutors carefully. I discuss, too, the kinds of listening necessary for listening for the joke, including attentiveness to complex possibilities for (...)
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  • Socratic Elenchus in the Sophist.Nicolas Zaks - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (4):371-390.
    This paper demonstrates the central role of the Socratic elenchus in the Sophist. In the first part, I defend the position that the Stranger describes the Socratic elenchus in the sixth division of the Sophist. In the second part, I show that the Socratic elenchus is actually used when the Stranger scrutinizes the accounts of being put forward by his predecessors. In the final part, I explain the function of the Socratic elenchus in the argument of the dialogue. By contrast (...)
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  • Il Teeteto e il suo rapporto con il Cratilo.Aldo Brancacci - 2020 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 41 (1):27-48.
    With the use of a particular metaphor, which appears at the end of the Cratylus and is taken up with perfect symmetry at the beginning of the Theaetetus, Plato certainly wanted to indicate the succession of Cratylus–Theaetetus as an order for reading the two dialogues, which Trasillus faithfully reproduced in structuring the second tetralogy of Platonic dialogues. The claim of the theory of ideas, with which the Cratylus ends, must therefore be considered the background in which to place not only (...)
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  • The Unity of Virtue: Plato’s Models of Philosophy.Mary Margaret McCabe - 2016 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 90 (1):1-25.
    Plato gives us two model philosophical figures, apparently in contrast with each other—one is the otherworldly philosopher who sees truth and reality outside the cave and has the knowledge to rule authoritatively within it; the other is the demotic figure of Socrates, who insists that he does not know but only asks questions. I consider Plato’s contrasting idioms of seeing and asking or talking, and argue that the rich account of perception that is represented in the Republic requires both idioms, (...)
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  • The Epistemological Benefits of Socrates’ Religious Experience.Audrey Anton - 2016 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 19 (1):70-87.
    There seems to be tension between portrayals of Socrates as both a committed philosopher and a pious man. For instance, one might doubt Socrates’ commitment to philosophy since he seems to irrationally defer to a daimonion. On the other hand, the fact that he challenges messages from Oracles and the gods’ role concerning the origin of the pious draws into question Socrates’ piety. In this paper, I argue that Socratic piety and rationality are not only compatible, but they are also (...)
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  • Sócrates Sobre Ser Bom.José Lourenço Pereira da Silva - 2020 - Filosofia Unisinos 21 (2).
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  • Other-Regarding Virtues and Their Place in Virtue Argumentation Theory.Felipe Oliveira de Sousa - 2020 - Informal Logic 40 (3):317-357.
    In this paper, I argue that, despite the progress made in recent years, virtue argumentation theory still lacks a more systematic acknowledgment of other-regarding virtues. A fuller recognition of such virtues not only enriches the field of research of virtue argumentation theory in significant ways, but also allows for a richer and more intuitive view of the virtuous arguer. A fully virtuous arguer, it is argued, should care to develop both self-regarding and other-regarding virtues. He should be concerned both with (...)
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  • On Knowledge as a Condition for Courage in Plato’s Protagoras.Erik Christensen - 2009 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 12 (1):70-84.
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  • Conhecimento e Opinião em Aristóteles (Segundos Analíticos I-33).Lucas Angioni - 2013 - In Marcelo Carvalho (ed.), Encontro Nacional Anpof: Filosofia Antiga e Medieval. Anpof. pp. 329-341.
    This chapter discusses the first part of Aristotle's Posterior Analytics A-33, 88b30-89a10. I claim that Aristotle is not concerned with an epistemological distinction between knowledge and belief in general. He is rather making a contrast between scientific knowledge (which is equivalent to explanation by the primarily appropriate cause) and some explanatory beliefs that falls short of capturing the primarily appropriate cause.
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  • Punishment (an Introductory Socratic Dialogue).Brent Silby - manuscript
    In this modern Socratic dialogue, Socrates discusses the nature of punishment with a friend who believes that criminals are dealt with too softly. Socrates argues that retributive punishment is unjust.
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  • Puntos de Vista de la Verdad: Sobre El Carácter Polifónico Del Pensamiento Platónico.Cristián De Bravo Delorme - 2020 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 61 (145):131-149.
    RESUMEN El siguiente artículo tiene como objetivo destacar el carácter polifónico del pensamiento platónico y poner en cuestión el sentido de la autoría de Platón. Suponer, a partir de obstinados prejuicios modernos, que Platón, tal como cualquier escritor moderno, habría expuesto su propia doctrina, es ignorar la importancia de la forma dramática de su pensamiento. El testimonio de la variedad de interlocutores y de puntos de vista que se suceden en los diferentes diálogos, nos invita a prestar atención a la (...)
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  • Socrates as Hoplite.Mark Anderson - 2005 - Ancient Philosophy 25 (2):273-289.
  • Perfection and Fiction : A Study in Iris Murdoch's Moral Philosophy.Frits Gåvertsson - 2018 - Dissertation, Lund University
    This thesis comprises a study of the ethical thought of Iris Murdoch with special emphasis, as evidenced by the title, on how morality is intimately connected to self-improvement aiming at perfection and how the study of fiction has an important role to play in our strive towards bettering ourselves within the framework set by Murdoch’s moral philosophy.
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  • »Megiston Agathon« – The Heart of Socrates’ Life and Philosophical Challenge.Marian Wesoły - 2011 - Peitho 2 (1):93-110.
    We suggest a certain minimal approach to the historical Socrates on the basis of Plato’s Apology. This text makes it possible to reconstruct the authentic charge and the defense line of Socrates, as well as his motivation and the quintessence of his philosophical challenge. The most important thing is what the philosopher says in the face of his death sentence: that the greatest good for a man is to live an examined life focusing on virtues and ethical values. Unfortunately, the (...)
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  • Persuasion, Justice and Democracy in Plato’s Crito.Yosef Z. Liebersohn - 2015 - Peitho 6 (1):147-166.
    Speeches and persuasion dominate Plato’s Crito. This paper, paying particular attention to the final passage in the dialogue, shows that the focus on speeches, persuasion and allusions to many other elements of rhetoric is an integral part of Plato’s severe criticism of democracy, one of the main points of the Crito. Speeches allow members of a democracy – represented in our dialogue by Crito – firstly to break the law for self-interested reasons while considering themselves still to be law-abiding citizens, (...)
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  • Plato’s Crito on Civil Disobedience and Political Obligations.Tomasz Kuniński - 2011 - Peitho 2 (1):139-158.
    The present paper focuses on the complex relation between ethics andpolitics in Plato’s Crito. While the issue is presented from a contemporaryperspective, the problems of civil disobedience and politicalobligation are the present study’s primarily concern. The issue of civildisobedience concerns moral reasons for breaking the law, whereasthe concept of political obligation refers to a moral duty to obey the law.When disagreeing with the view that Socrates in the dialogue arguesfor an unconditional obedience to the state, the article builds on theApology. (...)
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  • Socrates and Deliberative Democracy. On Socrates’ Conception of Politics in Plato’s Apology, Crito and Gorgias.Christoph Jedan - 2010 - Peitho 1 (1):31-44.
    The position of Socrates in Plato’s earlier dialogues is often seen as an anticipation of contemporary political theories. This article takes issue with the claim that Socrates anticipated modern theories of deliberative democracy. It examines three early Platonic dialogues and argues that the Socrates presented in the dialogues is actually far more dogmatic in ethical as well as religious matters than such annexations of Socrates can acknowledge. Furthermore, Socrates does not develop a theory that would support Athenian democracy. Although politically (...)
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  • The Scope of Corrective Justice in Aristotle’s Ethics.Włodzimierz Galewicz - 2017 - Peitho 8 (1):289-308.
    The task of corrective justice in Aristotle’s ethics is the rectification of harms or injuries resulting from voluntary or involuntary interactions between persons. However, the scope of this form of justice is not clear. In its widest conception it would include all harms done to a person against her will and without her fault. According to a narrower conception, instead, it is only an injury caused by an unjust or wrongful action that requires compensation. But in fact Aristotle distinguishes several (...)
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  • ‘‘Plato Socraticus’ – The Apology of Socrates and Euthyphro.Michael Erler - 2011 - Peitho 2 (1):79-92.
    The present paper focuses on the two works of Plato’s first tetralogyso as to bring out and generally characterize the Socratic dimensionof Plato’s philosophizing. It is common knowledge that Socrates’ trialand defense inspired Plato to engage in dialogical writing which culminatedin the famous logoi Sokratikoi. The article deals with the followingissues: 1. Philosophy as a ‘care for the soul’ in the Apology; 2. “The unexaminedlife is not worth living for a human being” ; 3. Philosophyas a service to the god (...)
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  • Virtue and Proper Use in Plato’s Euthydemus and Stoicism.Dimitrios Dentsoras - 2019 - Peitho 10 (1):45-64.
    The essay examines the description of virtue as a craft that governs the proper use of possessions in Plato’s Euthydemus and Stoicism. In the first part, I discuss Socrates’ parallel between wisdom and the crafts in the Euthydemus, and the resulting argument concerning the value of external and bodily possessions. I then offer some objections, showing how Socrates’ craft analogy allows one to think of possessions as good and ultimately fails to offer a defense of virtue’s sufficiency for happiness. In (...)
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  • Approaching Plato’s Euthyphro with a Calm Distance.Laura Candiotto - 2011 - Peitho 2 (1):39-56.
    The present paper aims to discuss how the Socratic method oper­ates with Euthyphro inside the Euthyphro. The first part of the article focuses on the character’s description, upon which it moves to analyz­ing the very method itself not only in terms of its argumentative form but also in terms of its psychological and social aspects. Euthyphro is shown to have been a supporter of religion that was entirely incapable of living up to the religious ideals that he so confidently advocated (...)
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  • Facing Epistemic Uncertainty: Characteristics, Possibilities, and Limitations of a Discursive.R. L. C. van Goor - 2012 - Dissertation, University of Amsterdam
     
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  • Sócrates e as leis: democracia e metafí­sica.Celso Martins Azar Filho - 2004 - Princípios 11 (15):29-63.
    Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Le concept de loi socratique a depuis toujours été l´objet decontroverses, principalement en raison des tentatives pour expliquerson attitude lors de son jugement, son emprisonnementet son exécution. Toute la difficulté de concilier entreeux les différents textes sur la philosophie et la vie de Socrate,naturellement ressort à propos des circonstances de sa condamnationet de sa mort. Si, dans l´état actuel de notre documentation,il paraît impossible d´apporter une solution définitive,néanmoins une possibilité d´en (...)
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  • The Problem is Not Mathematics, but Mathematicians: Plato and the Mathematicians Again.H. H. Benson - 2012 - Philosophia Mathematica 20 (2):170-199.
    I argue against a formidable interpretation of Plato’s Divided Line image according to which dianoetic correctly applies the same method as dialectic. The difference between the dianoetic and dialectic sections of the Line is not methodological, but ontological. I maintain that while this interpretation correctly identifies the mathematical method with dialectic, ( i.e. , the method of philosophy), it incorrectly identifies the mathematical method with dianoetic. Rather, Plato takes dianoetic to be a misapplication of the mathematical method by a subset (...)
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  • Philosophical Rhetoric and Sophistical Dialectic: Some Implications of Plato’s Critique of Rhetoric in the Phaedrus and the Sophist.Jean Wagemans - unknown
  • Is Technology Good for Us? A Eudaimonic Meta-Model for Evaluating the Contributive Capability of Technologies for a Good Life.Edward H. Spence - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (3):335-343.
    The title refers to the question addressed in this paper, namely, to what degree if any technology, including nanotechnologies, in the form of products and processes, is capable of contributing to a good life. To answer that question, the paper will develop a meta-normative model whose primary purpose is to determine the essential conditions that any normative theory of the Good Life and Technology (T-GLAT) must adequately address in order to be able to account for, explain and evaluate the Contributive (...)
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  • Commentary on Matthews.Martin Andic - 1997 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 13 (1):56-69.
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  • « Platonic Justice And What We Mean By ’Justice’ ».Terry Penner - 2005 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 5.
  • Is the Idea of the Good Beyond Being? Plato's "Epekeina Tês Ousias" Revisited.Rafael Ferber & Gregor Damschen - 2015 - In Debra Nails, Harold Tarrant, Mika Kajava & Eero Salmenkivi (eds.), SECOND SAILING: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Wellprint Oy. pp. 197-203.
    The article tries to prove that the famous formula "epekeina tês ousias" has to be understood in the sense of being beyond being and not only in the sense of being beyond essence. We make hereby three points: first, since pure textual exegesis of 509b8–10 seems to lead to endless controversy, a formal proof for the metaontological interpretation could be helpful to settle the issue; we try to give such a proof. Second, we offer a corollary of the formal proof, (...)
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  • La felicidad hoy: la definición del concepto de felicidad y los métodos para su estudio en la filosofía contemporánea.Javier Cárdenas - 2016 - Dissertation, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
    Este trabajo busca reflexionar en torno al siguiente problema: ¿cuál es la mejor forma de concebir la felicidad en la filosofía contemporánea? Para ello, dividiremos esta interrogante en dos. En primer lugar, indagaremos si acaso la felicidad es algo similar a lo que los griegos entendían por “eudaimonia”, i.e., una vida buena o digna de ser vivida; o si, en cambio, la felicidad es mejor entendida como un estado de la mente, postura que comienza a recibir mayor aceptación desde los (...)
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  • Irony as Expression (of a Sense of the Absurd).Mitchell Green - 2017 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 12 (1).
    Situational irony is, first, explained as a severe violation of one or more established, non-moral norms; such violation constitutes that situation’s absurdity. The classical “inversion” theory of communicative irony associated with Cicero and Quintilian, as well as its refinement in terms of the notion of conversational implicature (Grice 1989), are then shown to be inadequate. The echoic (Sperber 1984, Wilson 2006, Wilson and Sperber 2012) and pretence (Currie 2010) theories are also shown to fail to account for the broad range (...)
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  • A Horse is a Horse, of Course, of Course, but What About Horseness?Necip Fikri Alican - 2015 - In Debra Nails & Harold Tarrant (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Helsinki: Societas Scientiarum Fennica. pp. 307–324.
    Plato is commonly considered a metaphysical dualist conceiving of a world of Forms separate from the world of particulars in which we live. This paper explores the motivation for postulating that second world as opposed to making do with the one we have. The main objective is to demonstrate that and how everything, Forms and all, can instead fit into the same world. The approach is exploratory, as there can be no proof in the standard sense. The debate between explaining (...)
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  • Bad Luck to Take a Woman Aboard.Debra Nails - 2015 - In Debra Nails & Harold Tarrant (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Helsinki, Finland: Societas Scientiarum Fennica. pp. 73-90.
    Despite Diotima’s irresistible virtues and attractiveness across the millennia, she spells trouble for philosophy. It is not her fault that she has been misunderstood, nor is it Plato’s. Rather, I suspect, each era has made of Diotima what it desired her to be. Her malleability is related to the assumption that Plato invented her, that she is a mere literary fiction, licensing the imagination to do what it will. In the first part of my paper, I argue against three contemporary (...)
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  • Sócrates el enigma de Atenas.Oscar Mauricio Donato, Germán Meléndez, Andrea Lozano Vásquez, Dolores Amat, Leonardo Manfridi & Fernanda Rojas - 2015 - Bogotá: Universidad Libre.
  • Plato on the Desire for the Good.Rachel Barney - 2010 - In Sergio Tenenbaum (ed.), Desire, Practical Reason, and the Good. Oxford University Press. pp. 34--64.
  • 'Making New Gods? A Reflection on the Gift of the Symposium.Mitchell Miller - 2015 - In Debra Nails, Harold Tarrant, Mika Kajava & Eero Salmenkivi (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Societas Scientiarum Fennica. pp. 285-306.
    A commentary on the Symposium as a challenge and a gift to Athens. I begin with a reflection on three dates: 416 bce, the date of Agathon’s victory party, c. 400, the approximate date of Apollodorus’ retelling of the party, and c. 375, the approximate date of the ‘publication’ of the dialogue, and I argue that Plato reminds his contemporary Athens both of its great poetic and legal and scientific traditions and of the historical fact that the way late fourth (...)
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  • Philosophical Pursuit and Flight: Homer and Thucydides in Plato’s Laches1.Steve Maiullo - 2014 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 8 (1):72-91.
    This paper offers a new reading of Plato’s Laches that examines the dialogue’s philosophical approach not only to courage but also to two literary texts that both formed and questioned traditional Athenian views of it: Homer and Thucydides. In the middle of Plato’s Laches, the eponymous character claims that the courageous man “should be willing to stay in formation, to defend himself against the enemy, and to refuse to run away.” Socrates responds by wondering whether a man can be courageous (...)
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  • Colloquium 2: Socrates, Aristotle, and the Stoics on the Apparent and Real Good1.Marcelo Boeri - 2005 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):109-152.
  • Colloquium 8: A Socratic Interpretation Pf Plato’s Theaetetus.David Sedley - 2003 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):277-325.
  • Socrates’ Refutation of Gorgias.Alfssandra Fussi - 2002 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):123-154.
  • Commentary on Menn.Martha Nussbaum - 1995 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):35-45.
  • Colloquium 7.William Wians - 1992 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 8 (1):268-279.
  • Socratic Dialectic and the Resolution of Fallacy in Plato's Euthydemus.Carrie Elizabeth Swanson - unknown
    My dissertation is devoted to an examination of the resolution of fallacy in Plato's Euthydemus. It is a familiar claim that the Euthydemus champions Socratic argumentation over sophistical or eristic reasoning. No consensus however exists regarding either the nature or philosophical significance of Socrates’ treatment of the fallacies he confronts. I argue that a careful reading of the dialogue reveals that the Socratic response to fallacious reasoning is conducted at two different levels of philosophical sophistication. Socrates relies upon the resources (...)
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  • On the Status of Nous in the Philebus.Andrew J. Mason - 2014 - Phronesis 59 (2):143-169.
    Hackforth and Menn make a strong case for the identity of nous and the demiurge in Plato, but I argue that it does not hold in the case of the Philebus, where the demiurge is kept in the background, and the world-soul is in fact the referent in the passage assigning nous to the class of cause as governor of the universe. In the Statesman, the world-soul had had to own the problem of natural catastrophe, and I suggest that in (...)
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