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The socratic elenchus

Journal of Philosophy 79 (11):711-714 (1982)

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  1. Moral Seriousness.D. Seiple - 2020 - Metaphilosophy 51 (5):727-746.
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  • Self-Knowledge, Elenchus and Authority in Early Plato.Fiona Leigh - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (3):247-280.
    In some of Plato’s early dialogues we find a concern with correctly ascertaining the contents of a particular kind of one’s own psychological states, cognitive states. Indeed, one of the achievements of the elenctic method is to facilitate cognitive self-knowledge. In the Alcibiades, moreover, Plato interprets the Delphic injunction, ‘know yourself’, as crucially requiring cognitive self-knowledge, and ending in knowing oneself as subject to particular epistemic norms. Epistemic authority for self-knowledge is, for Plato, conferred on the basis of correct application (...)
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  • Conflictos socráticos en el Eutidemo: la crítica platónica a la dialéctica megárica.Mariana Gardella - 2013 - Argos (Universidad Simón Bolívar) 36 (1):45-64.
    En el presente artículo intentaremos mostrar que en el Eutidemo Platón desarrolla una crítica contra la dialéctica de los filósofos megáricos que tiene por objetivo señalar los aspectos problemáticos de la teoría del lenguaje que fundamenta el procedimiento erístico. Específicamente, Platón muestra que la falta de un criterio de verdad los lleva a comprometerse con enunciados que socavan los fundamentos de la dialéctica. In this paper we shall try to show that in the Euthydemus Plato develops a critic of the (...)
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  • Dialéctica y Refutación En El Sofista de Platón.Pilar Spangenberg - 2020 - Plato Journal 20:7-20.
    The dialectic exhibited in Plato’s dialogues assumes different characters throughout the corpus. Nevertheless, it remains always linked to refutation. In this way, like dialectic, refutation assumes different characteristics. The aim of this work is to show how refutation takes a key role in the Sophist, even with unique features: far from facing an opponent of flesh and blood as in Socratic dialogues, the Eleatic Stranger faces hypotheses, and instead of examining consistence within the opponent’s beliefs, he draws upon a radical (...)
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  • Reconsidering Socrates' Influence on Moral Education Through the Elenchus.Claude Gendron - 1999 - Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Education Society 12 (2):19-31.
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  • Fleshly Love, Platonic Love in the Symposium.María Angélica Fierro - 2019 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 59.
    Here I aim to show how the views on the body in Plato´’s Symposium must be considered not as contradictory but as complementary. The three main thesis of this paper are: a) The body is essential for the triggering of “erôs”, insofar as sexual attraction to beautiful bodies is the most natural way in which anyone can start to develop an erotic experience. b) The ascent towards beauty itself implies detachment from a particular body as such in order to move (...)
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  • Kant's Moral Catechism Revisited.Courtney Morris - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophy of Education.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
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  • Purification Through Emotions: The Role of Shame in Plato’s Sophist 230b4–E5.Laura Candiotto - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):576-585.
    This article proposes an analysis of Plato’s Sophist that underlines the bond between the logical and the emotional components of the Socratic elenchus, with the aim of depicting the social valence of this philosophical practice. The use of emotions characterizing the ‘elenctic’ method described by Plato is crucial in influencing the audience and is introduced at the very moment in which the interlocutor attempts to protect his social image by concealing his shame at being refuted. The audience, thanks to Plato’s (...)
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  • Reductio Ad Absurdum From a Dialogical Perspective.Catarina Dutilh Novaes - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (10):2605-2628.
    It is well known that reductio ad absurdum arguments raise a number of interesting philosophical questions. What does it mean to assert something with the precise goal of then showing it to be false, i.e. because it leads to absurd conclusions? What kind of absurdity do we obtain? Moreover, in the mathematics education literature number of studies have shown that students find it difficult to truly comprehend the idea of reductio proofs, which indicates the cognitive complexity of these constructions. In (...)
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  • Meeting Hintikka's Challenge to Paraconsistentism.Walter Carnielli - 2009 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 13 (3):283-297.
    Jaakko Hintikka, in a series of talks in Brazil in 2008, defended that IF logic and paraconsistent logic are, in a sense, very similar. Having sketched the proposal of a new paraconsistent system, he maintains that several achievements of IF logic could be reproducible in paraconsistent logic. One of the major difficulties, left as a challenge, would be to formulate some truth conditions for this new paraconsistent first-order language in order to make IF logic and paraconsistent logic more inter-related. My (...)
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  • The Anatomy of a Dialogue.Andre M. Archie - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Research 35:129-146.
    This paper shows Socratic elenchus as an efficient and effective way of modeling rational knowledge seeking. Like ordinary conversations, the elenctic exchanges in the dialogues presuppose a degree of autonomy on the part of its participants. Socrates’ line of questioning often seems pertinent to a particular interlocutor because he is well aware of the fact that the interlocutor has goals and ambitions or is reputed to be an expert at something. In turn, Socrates’ line ofquestioning reflects his own goals and (...)
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  • Socrates and the True Political Craft.J. Clerk Shaw - 2011 - Classical Philology 106:187-207.
    This paper argues that Socrates does not claim to be a political expert at Gorgias 521d6-8, as many scholars say. Still, Socrates does claim a special grasp of true politics. His special grasp (i) results from divine dispensation; (ii) is coherent true belief about politics; and (iii) also is Socratic wisdom about his own epistemic shortcomings. This condition falls short of expertise in two ways: Socrates sometimes lacks fully determinate answers to political questions, and he does not grasp the first (...)
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  • Euclides de Mégara, filósofo socrático.Mariana Gardella - 2014 - Agora 33 (2):19-37.
    El objetivo de este trabajo es mostrar la influencia socrática sobre la filosofía de Euclides de Mégara, en contra de la interpretación que señala la influencia de los eleáticos sobre su teoría. Para ello indicaré que la doctrina de Euclides exhibe una fuerte impronta socrática, al menos en lo que concierne a: su labor como escritor de diálogos socráticos, el uso de la dialéctica erística, el desarrollo de algunos postulados éticos sobre la conducta frente a la muerte, el auto-dominio y (...)
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  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Editors Polis: The Journal for Ancient Gree - 2006 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 23 (2):385-431.
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  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Editors Polis: The Journal for Ancie - 2006 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 23 (2):385-431.
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  • Meno, the Slave Boy and the Elenchos.Hugh H. Benson - 1990 - Phronesis 35 (1):128-158.
  • The Method Εξ ΥποΕσεως at Meno 86e1-87d8.David Wolfsdorf - 2008 - Phronesis 53 (1):35-64.
    Scholars ubiquitously refer to the method εξ υποθεσεως, introduced at Meno 86e1-87d8, as a method of hypothesis. In contrast, this paper argues that the method εξ υποθεσεως in Meno is not a hypothetical method. On the contrary, in the Meno passage, υποθεσις means “postulate”, that is, cognitively secure proposition. Furthermore, the method εξ υποθεσεως is derived from the method of geometrical analysis. More precisely, it is derived from the use of geometrical analysis to achieve reduction, that is, reduction of a (...)
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  • Interpreting Mrs Malaprop: Davidson and Communication Without Conventions.Imogen Smith - unknown
    Inspired by my reading of the conclusions of Plato’s Cratylus, in which I suggest that Socrates endorses the claim that speaker’s intentions determine meaning of their utterances, this thesis investigates a modern parallel. Drawing on observations that people who produce an utterances that do not accord with the conventions of their linguistic community can often nevertheless communicate successfully, Donald Davidson concludes that it is the legitimate intentions of speakers to be interpreted in a particular way that determine the meanings of (...)
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  • Philosophical Rhetoric and Sophistical Dialectic: Some Implications of Plato’s Critique of Rhetoric in the Phaedrus and the Sophist.Jean Wagemans - unknown
  • Socrates and the Critique of Metaphysics.Ian Angus - 2005 - The European Legacy 10 (4):299-314.
    An extended critique of the applicability of Martin Heidegger and Friedrich Nietzsche's thesis of the end of metaphysics to the philosophical practice of Socrates.
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  • Phainomena e explicação na Ética Eudêmia de Aristóteles.Raphael Zillig - 2014 - In Conocimiento, ética y estética en la Filosofía Antigua: Actas del II Simposio Nacional de Filosofía Antigua. Rosário, Argentina: Asociación Argentina de Filosofía Antigua. pp. 330-336.
  • Dialectical Strategic Planning in Aristotle.Iovan Drehe - 2015 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 2 (3):287–309.
    The purpose of this paper is to give an account and a rational reconstruction of the heuristic advice provided by Aristotle in the Topics and Prior Analytics in regard to the difficulty or ease of strategic planning in the context of a dialectical dialogue. The general idea is that a Questioner can foresee what his refutational syllogism would have to look like given the character of the thesis defended by the Answerer, and therefore plan accordingly. A rational reconstruction of this (...)
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  • Is the Idea of the Good Beyond Being? Plato's "Epekeina Tês Ousias" Revisited.Rafael Ferber & Gregor Damschen - 2015 - In Debra Nails, Harold Tarrant, Mika Kajava & Eero Salmenkivi (eds.), SECOND SAILING: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Wellprint Oy. pp. 197-203.
    The article tries to prove that the famous formula "epekeina tês ousias" has to be understood in the sense of being beyond being and not only in the sense of being beyond essence. We make hereby three points: first, since pure textual exegesis of 509b8–10 seems to lead to endless controversy, a formal proof for the metaontological interpretation could be helpful to settle the issue; we try to give such a proof. Second, we offer a corollary of the formal proof, (...)
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  • A Horse is a Horse, of Course, of Course, but What About Horseness?Necip Fikri Alican - 2015 - In Debra Nails & Harold Tarrant (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Helsinki: Societas Scientiarum Fennica. pp. 307–324.
    Plato is commonly considered a metaphysical dualist conceiving of a world of Forms separate from the world of particulars in which we live. This paper explores the motivation for postulating that second world as opposed to making do with the one we have. The main objective is to demonstrate that and how everything, Forms and all, can instead fit into the same world. The approach is exploratory, as there can be no proof in the standard sense. The debate between explaining (...)
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  • Bad Luck to Take a Woman Aboard.Debra Nails - 2015 - In Debra Nails & Harold Tarrant (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Helsinki, Finland: Societas Scientiarum Fennica. pp. 73-90.
    Despite Diotima’s irresistible virtues and attractiveness across the millennia, she spells trouble for philosophy. It is not her fault that she has been misunderstood, nor is it Plato’s. Rather, I suspect, each era has made of Diotima what it desired her to be. Her malleability is related to the assumption that Plato invented her, that she is a mere literary fiction, licensing the imagination to do what it will. In the first part of my paper, I argue against three contemporary (...)
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  • Conocimiento, descubrimiento Y reminiscencia en el menón de platón.Alejandro Farieta - 2013 - Universitas Philosophica 30 (60):205-234.
    This work articulates two thesis: one Socratic and one Platonic; and displays how the first one is heir of the second. The Socratic one is called the principle of priority of definition; the Platonic one is the Recollection theory. The articulation between both theses is possible due to the Meno’s paradox, which makes a criticism on the first thesis, but it is solved with the second one. The consequence of this articulation is a new interpretation of the Recollection theory, as (...)
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  • Knowledge, Discovery and Reminiscence in Plato's Meno.Alejandro Farieta - 2013 - Universitas Philosophica 30 (60):205-234.
    This work articulates two thesis: one Socratic and one Platonic; and displays how the first one is heir of the second. The Socratic one is called the principle of priority of definition; the Platonic one is the Recollection theory. The articulation between both theses is possible due to the Meno’s paradox, which makes a criticism on the first thesis, but it is solved with the second one. The consequence of this articulation is a new interpretation of the Recollection theory, as (...)
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  • Colloquium 6: When The Middle Comes Early: Puzzles And Perplexeties In Plato’s Dialogues.Miriam Byrd - 2013 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):187-209.
    In this paper I focus on the problem of accounting for apparent inconsistencies between Plato’s early and middle works. Developmentalism seeks to account for these variances by differentiating a Socratic philosophy in the early dialogues from a Platonic philosophy in the middle. In opposition to this position, I propose an alternative explanation: differences between these two groups are due to Plato’s depiction and use of middle period epistemology. I argue that, in the early dialogues, Plato depicts Socrates’ use of the (...)
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  • Can You Seek the Answer to This Question? (Meno in India).Amber Carpenter & Jonardon Ganeri - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):571-594.
    Plato articulates a deep perplexity about inquiry in ?Meno's Paradox??the claim that one can inquire neither into what one knows, nor into what one does not know. Although some commentators have wrestled with the paradox itself, many suppose that the paradox of inquiry is special to Plato, arising from peculiarities of the Socratic elenchus or of Platonic epistemology. But there is nothing peculiarly Platonic in this puzzle. For it arises, too, in classical Indian philosophical discussions, where it is formulated with (...)
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  • Byrd/Press Bibliography.Editors Proceedings of the Boston Ar - 2013 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):215-216.
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  • Colloquium 4: The Method of Hypothesis in the Meno.Hugh Benson - 2003 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):95-143.
  • Colloquium 8.Ruby Blondell - 1998 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):213-238.
  • Thinking in the Between with Heidegger and Plato.Sean D. Kirkland - 2007 - Research in Phenomenology 37 (1):95-111.
    In this essay, I attempt first to clarify what non-metaphysical thinking as a thinking "in the Between" might mean for Heidegger, as presented in his Beiträge zur Philosophie . After determining this as the proper response to the self-concealment Heidegger sees as grounding the appearing of beings, I then attempt to show that the elenctic method of Socrates in Plato's early dialogues exhibits something like the same dynamic. That is, Socrates attempts to situate himself and his interlocutors in a space (...)
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  • Plato on Education and Art.Rachana Kamtekar - 2008 - In Gail Fine (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Plato. Oxford University Press. pp. 336--359.
    The article resonates Plato's ideas on education and art. In the Apology, Socrates describes his life's mission of practicing philosophy as aimed at getting the Athenians to care for virtue; in the Gorgias, Plato claims that happiness depends entirely on education and justice; in the Protagoras and the Meno, he puzzles about whether virtue is teachable or how else it might be acquired; in the Phaedrus, he explains that teaching and persuading require knowledge of the soul and its powers, which (...)
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  • Consistency and Akrasia in Plato's Protagoras.Raphael Woolf - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (3):224-252.
    Relatively little attention has been paid to Socrates' argument against akrasia in Plato's "Protagoras" as an example of Socratic method. Yet seen from this perspective the argument has some rather unusual features: in particular, the presence of an impersonal interlocutor ("the many") and the absence of the crisp and explicit argumentation that is typical of Socratic elenchus. I want to suggest that these features are problematic, considerably more so than has sometimes been supposed, and to offer a reading of the (...)
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  • Socratic Dialectic and the Resolution of Fallacy in Plato's Euthydemus.Carrie Elizabeth Swanson - unknown
    My dissertation is devoted to an examination of the resolution of fallacy in Plato's Euthydemus. It is a familiar claim that the Euthydemus champions Socratic argumentation over sophistical or eristic reasoning. No consensus however exists regarding either the nature or philosophical significance of Socrates’ treatment of the fallacies he confronts. I argue that a careful reading of the dialogue reveals that the Socratic response to fallacious reasoning is conducted at two different levels of philosophical sophistication. Socrates relies upon the resources (...)
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  • Ancestor Worship in The Logic of Games. How Foundational Were Aristotle's Contributions?John Woods - 2013 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 8 (1).
    Notwithstanding their technical virtuosity and growing presence in mainstream thinking, game theoretic logics have attracted a sceptical question: "Granted that logic can be done game theoretically, but what would justify the idea that this is the preferred way to do it?'' A recent suggestion is that at least part of the desired support might be found in the Greek dialectical writings. If so, perhaps we could say that those works possess a kind of foundational significance. The relation of being foundational (...)
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  • Aristotle on Non-Contradiction: Philosophers Vs. Non-Philosophers.Jean-Louis Hudry - 2013 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 7 (2):51.
  • Poeticidad y potencia epistémica de la palabra en las filosofías socráticas.Claudia Mársico - 2014 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 20:221-246.
    Resumen Este trabajo parte del fenómeno de constitución del diálogo socrático como formato discursivo para avanzar en la caracterización del modo en que varios representantes de este movimiento comprenden los límites del lenguaje, su poeticidad y su capacidad para representar lo real. La critica homérica en Antístenes y de los desarrollos sobre erótica en Esquines ofrecen un contexto interesante para sopesar los desarrollos platónicos y estudiar, en el contexto de conformación de la filosofía como género autónomo, la importancia y alcances (...)
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  • On Genealogy and Ideology Criticism.Christopher John Allsobrook - unknown
    This thesis identifies and explains a fundamental philosophical problem of self-implication in Marxian ideology criticism that has led to its misuse and rejection in social theory and political philosophy. I argue that Friedrich Nietzsche’s development of genealogy as a method of social criticism complements ideology criticism in a way that overcomes this problem, by addressing it explicitly, rather than trying to avoid it. In making this argument, I hope to bridge a widely perceived gap between Nietzsche’s and Michel Foucault’s genealogical (...)
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  • Chapter Nine.Alexander Nehamas - 1986 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 2 (1):275-316.
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  • Chapter Two.Henry Teloh - 1986 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 2 (1):25-38.
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  • The Unexamined Student is Not Worth Teaching: Preparation, the Zone of Proximal Development, and the Socratic Model of Scaffolded Learning.Robert Colter & Joseph Ulatowski - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (14):1367-1380.
    ‘Scaffolded learning’ describes a cluster of instructional techniques designed to move students from a novice position toward greater understanding, such that they become independent learners. Our Socratic Model of Scaffolded Learning includes two phases not normally included in discussions of scaffolded learning, the preparatory and problematizing phases. Our article will illuminate this blind spot by arguing that these crucial preliminary elements ought to be considered an integral part of a scaffolding model. If instructors are cognizant of the starting position of (...)
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  • On Irony Interpretation: Socratic Method in Plato's Euthyphro.Dylan Brian Futter - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (6):1030-1051.
    Socratic Method in the Euthyphro can be fruitfully analysed as a method of irony interpretation. Socrates' method – the irony of irony interpretation – is to pretend that Euthyphro is an ironist in order to transform him into a self-ironist. To be a self-ironist is to ironize one's knowledge of virtue in order to bring an intuitive and unarticulated awareness of virtue to mind. The exercise of the capacity for self-irony is then a mode of striving for the good.
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  • Socrates’s Conception of Philosophy.Shigeru Yonezawa - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):1.
  • “Chalepa Ta Kala,” “Fine Things Are Difficult”: Socrates’ Insights Into the Psychology of Teaching and Learning. [REVIEW]Avi I. Mintz - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (3):287-299.
    The proverb “chalepa ta kala” is invoked in three dialogues in the Platonic corpus: Hippias Major, Cratylus and Republic. In this paper, I argue that the context in which the proverb arises reveals Socrates’ considerable pedagogical dexterity as he uses the proverb to rebuke his interlocutor in one dialogue but to encourage his interlocutors in another. In the third, he gauges his interlocutors’ mention of the proverb to be indicative of their preparedness for a more difficult philosophical trial. What emerges (...)
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  • Subjective Thinking: Kierkegaard on Hegel's Socrates.Daniel Watts - 2010 - Hegel Bulletin of Great Britain 61 (Spring / Summer):23-44.
    This essay considers the critical response to Hegel's view of Socrates we find in Kierkegaard's dissertation, The Concept of Irony. I argue that this dispute turns on the question whether or not the examination of particular thinkers enters into Socrates’ most basic aims and interests. I go on to show how Kierkegaard's account, which relies on an affirmative answer to this question, enables him to provide a cogent defence of Socrates' philosophical practice against Hegel's criticisms.
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  • The Practicality of Ancient Virtue Ethics: Greece and China.Jiyuan Yu - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):289-302.
    Virtue ethics has been charged with being unable to provide solutions to practical moral issues. In response, the defenders of virtue ethics argue that normative virtue ethics exists. The debate is significant on its own, yet both sides of the controversy approach the issue from the assumption that moral philosophy has to tell us what we should do. In this essay, I would like to examine the question regarding the practicality of virtue ethics in a different way. Virtue ethics is (...)
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  • The Method at Meno 86e1-87d8.David Wolfsdorf - 2008 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 53 (1):35-64.
  • A Structural Hermeneutics of The O’Reilly Factor.Matthew Norton - 2011 - Theory and Society 40 (3):315-346.