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Was Plato a Feminist?

The Times Literary Supplement:276, 288-9 (March 17-23 1989)

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  1. “El más piadoso de todos los animales”: en torno a las motivaciones religiosas del descenso a la caverna en República.Carlo Jesús Orellano QuiJano - 2020 - Estudios de Filosofía 18:11-36.
    El punto central de análisis del trabajo es la katábasis o descenso del filósofo a la caverna como parte de la alegoría presentada en República VII. Frente a tres interpretaciones alternativas que serán mencionadas, se expondrá una interpretación que, sin entrar en conflicto con las anteriores, podría complementarlas por cuanto toma en cuenta el aspecto religioso inherente a la comprensión platónica de la filosofía: la homoíōsis theōi. Para ello, se analizarán pasajes del diálogo mencionado a la luz de otros provenientes (...)
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  • Prostrating Before Adrasteia: Comedy, Philosophy, and “One’s Own” in Republic V.Sonja Tanner - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):35-53.
    Comedy and philosophy have too often been thought immiscible, a tradition supported by a solemn reading of philosophers such as Plato. A closer look at Plato – and specifically at what may be his most familiar dialogue – the Republic, suggests just the contrary. Far from immiscible, comedy and philosophy are entwined in ways that are mutually illuminating. I argue that a joke in Book V reveals the self-forgetting involved in founding the city in speech, and so illustrates the vitality (...)
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  • Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's Symposium.Nancy Evans - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):1-27.
    Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the “rites of love” in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical Athenian practices, and propose (...)
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  • Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's.Nancy Evans - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):1 - 27.
    : Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the "rites of love" in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical Athenian practices, and (...)
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  • Plato's Critical Theory.Sara Brill - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):233-248.
    This paper argues that the creation of Kallipolis and the educational pro­gamme designed therein should be read in the context of one branch of Plato’s critique of Athenian democracy; namely, its employment of the Laconizing trope prominent in Politeia literature in order to identify and radicalize the desires innervated by an idealized vision of Spartan unity. In particular, it aims to show that the discussion of sexual difference in the famous first wave of Book 5, as well as the peculiar (...)
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  • Stoicism, Feminism and Autonomy.Scott Aikin & Emily McGill-Rutherford - 2014 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 1 (1):9-22.
    The ancient Stoics had an uneven track record with regard to women’s standing. On the one hand, they recognized women as fully capable of rationality and virtue. On the other hand, they continued to hold that women’s roles were in the home. These views are consistent, given Stoic value theory, but are unacceptable on liberal feminist grounds. Stoic value theory, given different emphasis on the ethical role of choice, is shown to be capable of satisfying the liberal feminist requirement that (...)
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  • Review Article: States Of Distinction: New Essays on Plato’s Laws.Susan B. Levin - 2012 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 29 (1):165-180.
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