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  1. Review Article: The Bergen Electronic Edition of Wittgenstein's Nachlass.David Stern - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):455-467.
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  • Models of memory: Wittgenstein and cognitive science.David G. Stern - 1991 - Philosophical Psychology 4 (2):203-18.
  • Interactive Dynamic Presentation (IDP) and Semantic Faceted Search and Browsing (SFB) of the Wittgenstein Nachlass.Alois Pichler - 2023 - Wittgenstein-Studien 14 (1):131-151.
    In 2000 the Wittgenstein Archives at the University of Bergen (WAB) published the CD-ROM edition of Wittgenstein’s Nachlass: The Bergen Electronic Edition (BEE). Moreover, since then WAB has worked towards complementing the static CD-ROM edition with an interactive web platform that additionally allows more user-specific and more user-tailored utilizations of WAB’s Nachlass resources. The paper describes two specific web service tools of this platform: Interactive Dynamic Presentation (IDP) of the Wittgenstein Nachlass and Semantic Faceted Search and Browsing (SFB) of Wittgenstein (...)
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  • Aphorisms, waste-books and the philosophy of short forms: Wittgenstein and Lichtenberg.Michael A. Peters - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (12):1960-1967.
  • Sources of the remarks in wittgenstein'sphilosophical investigations.André Maury - 1994 - Synthese 98 (3):349 - 378.
  • Style in Philosophy: Parts II and III.Manfred Frank - 1999 - Metaphilosophy 30 (4):264-301.
    The essential task of the philosophy of style is to uncover the irreducibility of the singular to any kind of universal, static structure or metalinguistic code. Style is not only a surplus element that exceeds propositional meaning, but also a clue of the ineradicable contingency of “intersubjective”‐communicational relationships. The receiver must respect the unique individuality of the sender's style as what demonstrates the cognitive inexhaustibility of the world. Consequently, philosophy can no longer regard literature as foreign and incorrigible by asserting (...)
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  • Wittgenstein’s Conception of Hypotheses in Chapters XII and XXII of ‘Philosophical Remarks’ and the Function of Language.Florian Franken Figueiredo - 2021 - Philosophical Investigations 44 (2):163-188.
    In this paper, I explore Wittgenstein’s conception of a hypothesis as articulated in Chapters XII and XXII of ‘Philosophical Remarks’. First, I argue that in Chapter XII, Wittgenstein draws on his account of infinity to begin to challenge the view that all hypotheses can be proven by empirical evidence. I then argue that in Chapter XXII that Wittgenstein sharpens this conception of hypotheses claiming that no hypotheses can be verified. Finally, I suggest that Wittgenstein’s conception of a hypothesis relates to (...)
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  • Chains of Life: Turing, Lebensform, and the Emergence of Wittgenstein’s Later Style.Juliet Floyd - 2016 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 5 (2):7-89.
    This essay accounts for the notion of _Lebensform_ by assigning it a _logical _role in Wittgenstein’s later philosophy. Wittgenstein’s additions of the notion to his manuscripts of the _PI_ occurred during the initial drafting of the book 1936-7, after he abandoned his effort to revise _The Brown Book_. It is argued that this constituted a substantive step forward in his attitude toward the notion of simplicity as it figures within the notion of logical analysis. Next, a reconstruction of his later (...)
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  • Wittgensteins Manuskriptbände aus dem Jahr 1929.Florian Franken Figueiredo - 2023 - Wittgenstein-Studien 14 (1):95-111.
    Wittgenstein's manuscript volumes from 1929: Reflections on the Chronology of MSS 105 – 107. In this paper I identify the evidence that might be used to establish a viable chronology for Wittgenstein’s writing of his manuscript volumes 105 – 107 and sections thereof. Since Wittgenstein omits to date his entries in these three 1929 volumes between February 15 and September 11, the evaluation of these different chronologies must remain somewhat speculative, but the justifications for each can, as I will show, (...)
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  • “Among the omitted stuff, there are many good remarks of a general nature” – On the Making of von Wright and Wittgenstein’s Culture and Value.Christian Erbacher - 2017 - SATS 18 (2):79-113.
    This paper uses archival material to contextualize Georg Henrik von Wright’s making of Vermischte Bemerkungen (Culture and Value), an edition that assembles Wittgenstein’s remarks on cultural topics. Von Wright was particularly interested in these remarks but initially regarded them as too detached from philosophy to be published. In 1967-68, however, he began seeing socio-political questions as belonging to philosophy. He then resumed editing Wittgenstein’s ‘general remarks’ and published them in 1977. Von Wright did not read Culture and Value as a (...)
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  • Editorial Approaches to W ittgenstein's Nachlass: Towards a Historical Appreciation.Christian Erbacher - 2014 - Philosophical Investigations 38 (3):165-198.
    Building on the unpublished correspondence between Ludwig Wittgenstein's literary executors Rush Rhees, Elizabeth Anscombe and Georg Henrik von Wright, this paper sketches the historical development of different editorial approaches to Wittgenstein's Nachlass. Using the metaphor of a ladder, it is possible to distinguish seven significant “rungs” or “steps” in the history of editing Wittgenstein's writings. The paper focuses particularly on the first four rungs, elucidating how Rhees, Anscombe and von Wright developed different editorial approaches that resulted in significant differences in (...)
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  • “Good” Philosophical Reasons for “Bad” Editorial Philology? On Rhees and Wittgenstein'sPhilosophical Grammar.Christian Erbacher - 2019 - Philosophical Investigations 42 (2):111-145.
    Using new archival material, this article reconstructs the editorial history of Philosophical Grammar, an edition that Rush Rhees crafted from Wittgenstein's papers. Contrasting the often‐held view that Rhees, in editing Philosophical Grammar, arbitrarily interfered with Wittgenstein's Big Typescript, the article illuminates the work, motives and reasons that underlie Rhees’ editing. Although recent philological evidence supports his editorial decisions, Rhees, at the time, made them based on his desire to do justice to his understanding of Wittgenstein's philosophical orientation. Against this background, (...)
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  • Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Cambridge Period.Natalia Tomashpolskaia - 2023 - Prolegomena: Journal of Philosophy 22 (2):257-294.
    This article analyses in detail Wittgenstein’s ‘Cambridge period’ from his return to Cambridge in 1929 until his decease in 1951. Within the ‘Cambridge period’, scholars usually distinguish the ‘middle’ (1929–1936) and the ‘late’ (1936–1951) periods. The trigger point of Wittgenstein’s return to Cambridge and philosophy was his visit to Brouwer’s lecture on ‘Mathematics, Science, and Language’ in Vienna in March 1928. Dutch mathematician Brouwer influenced not only Wittgenstein’s ability to do philosophy again but also the development of some of his (...)
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