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  1. The Logic of Deferral: Educational Aims and Intellectual Disability.Ashley Taylor - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (3):265-285.
    The educational aims described by educational philosophers rarely embrace the full range of differences in intellectual ability, adaptive behavior, or communication that children exhibit. Because envisioned educational aims have significant consequences for how educational practices, pedagogy, and curricula are conceptualized, the failure to acknowledge and embrace differences in ability leaves open the question of the extent to which students with intellectual disabilities are subject to the same aims as their “typically-developing” peers. In articulating and defending valued aims of education, educational (...)
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  • Democratic Silence: Two Forms of Domination in the Social Contract Tradition.Toby Rollo - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-14.
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  • Agency and Moral Status.Jeff Sebo - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (1):1-22.
    According to our traditional conception of agency, most human beings are agents and most, if not all, nonhuman animals are not. However, recent developments in philosophy and psychology have made it clear that we need more than one conception of agency, since human and nonhuman animals are capable of thinking and acting in more than one kind of way. In this paper, I make a distinction between perceptual and propositional agency, and I argue that many nonhuman animals are perceptual agents (...)
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  • Respecting Profoundly Disabled Learners.John Vorhaus - 2006 - Philosophy of Education 40 (3):313-328.
    The goal of inclusion is more or less credible depending in part on what it is that learners have in common. I discuss one characteristic that all learners are thought to share, although the learners I am concerned with represent an awkward case for the aspiration of inclusivity. Respect is thought of as something owed to all persons, and I defend the view that this includes persons with profound and multiple learning difficulties and disabilities. I also consider the implications of (...)
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  • Respecting Profoundly Disabled Learners.John Vorhaus - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (3):313–328.
    The goal of inclusion is more or less credible depending in part on what it is that learners have in common. I discuss one characteristic that all learners are thought to share, although the learners I am concerned with represent an awkward case for the aspiration of inclusivity. Respect is thought of as something owed to all persons, and I defend the view that this includes persons with profound and multiple learning difficulties and disabilities. I also consider the implications of (...)
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  • Interspecies Politics: Reply to Hinchcliffe and Ladwig.Sue Donaldson & Will Kymlicka - 2015 - Journal of Political Philosophy 23 (3):321-344.
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