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  1. A Crise Social Na Atenas de Sólon E o Estabelecimento da Justiça Baseada No Governo da Lei.S. Carvalho & F. J. Neto - 2014 - Humanitas 66:59-85.
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  • O Lógos Dos Polloí No Argumento de Gláucon.Luiz Maurício B. R. Menezes - 2014 - Filosofia Unisinos 15 (1).
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  • “Charaxus Arrived with a Full Ship!” The Poetics of Welcome in Sappho's Brothers Song and the Charaxus Song Cycle.Peter A. O'Connell - 2018 - Classical Antiquity 37 (2):236-266.
    By analyzing the parallels between Sappho's Brothers Song and archaic Greek songs of welcome, especially Archilochus fr. 24 West, this essay offers a new interpretation of the Brothers Song. It clarifies that ἔλθην in the first preserved stanza represents an original aorist indicative. The chatterer repeats over and over a welcome song that begins, “Charaxus arrived with a full ship.” The rest of the song continues to engage with the welcome song tradition, anticipating the welcome song that will celebrate Charaxus' (...)
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  • Musical Instruments and the Paean in Archilochus.Paula Da Cunha Corrêa - 2009 - Synthesis (la Plata) 16:99-112.
  • Inventing the Hetaira: Sex, Politics, and Discursive Conflict in Archaic Greece.Leslie Kurke - 1997 - Classical Antiquity 16 (1):106-150.
    According to Xenophon, the hetaira "gratified" her patron as a philos, participating in an aristocratic network of gift exchange , while the pornê, as her name signified, trafficked in sex as a commodity. Recent writers on Greek prostitution have acknowledged that hetaira vs. pornê may be as much a discursive opposition as a real difference in status, but still, very little attention has been paid to the period of the "invention" of this binary. Hetaira meaning "courtesan" first occurs in Herodotus (...)
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  • Diverting Demons: Ritual, Poetic Mockery and the Odysseus-Iros Encounter.Deborah Steiner - 2009 - Classical Antiquity 28 (1):71-100.
    This article treats the verbal and physical altercation between the disguised Odysseus and the local beggar Iros at the start of Odyssey 18 and explores the overlapping ritual and generic aspects of the encounter so as to account for many of its otherwise puzzling features. Beginning with the detailed characterization of Iros at the book's start, I demonstrate how the poet assigns to the parasite properties and modes of behavior that have close analogues in later descriptions of pharmakoi and of (...)
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  • “I Let Go My Force Just Touching Her Hair”: Male Sexuality in Athenian Vase-Paintings of Silens and Iambic Poetry.G. Hedreen - 2006 - Classical Antiquity 25 (2):277-325.
    In Archaic Athenian vase-painting, silens are often sexually aroused, but only sporadically satisfy their desires in a manner acceptable to most Athenian men. François Lissarrague persuasively argued that the sexuality of silens in vase-painting was probably laughable rather than awe-inspiring. What sort of laughter did the vase-paintings elicit? Was it the scornful laughter of a person who felt nothing in common with silens, or the laughter of one made to see something of himself in their behavior? For three reasons, I (...)
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  • Hipponax Fragment 128W: Epic Parody or Expulsive Incantation?Christopher A. Faraone - 2004 - Classical Antiquity 23 (2):209-245.
    Scholars have traditionally interpreted Hipponax fragment 128 as an epic parody designed to belittle the grand pretensions and gluttonous habits of his enemy. I suggest, however, that this traditional reading ultimately falls short because of two unexamined assumptions: that the meter and diction of the fragment are exclusively meant to recall epic narrative and not any other early hexametrical genre, and that the descriptive epithets in lines 2 and 3 are the ad hoc comic creations of the poet and simply (...)
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  • BeforeTurannoiWere Tyrants: Rethinking a Chapter of Early Greek History.Greg Anderson - 2005 - Classical Antiquity 24 (2):173-222.
    According to classical and postclassical sources, the early Greek turannoi were, by definition, illegitimate rulers who overturned existing political arrangements and installed rogue monarchic regimes in their place. And on this one fundamental point at least, modern observers of archaic turannides seem to have little quarrel with their ancient informants. To this day, it remains axiomatic that Cypselus, Peisistratus, and the rest were autocrats who gained power by usurpation. Whatever their individual accomplishments, they were still, in a word, "tyrants." Relying (...)
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  • Out-Foxing the Wolf-Walker: Lycambes as Performative Rival to Archilochus.Tom Hawkins - 2008 - Classical Antiquity 27 (1):93-114.
    Lycambes, the most famous of Archilochus' whipping boys, is everywhere upstaged in the surviving iambic texts and testimonia. This paper seeks to reconstruct something of Lycambes' voice and its role in the Archilochean tradition. I begin with a reconsideration of Archilochus' “first epode” and argue that Lycambes is styled as an older public rival to Archilochus who questions the role of the poet's iambos. The preliminary results of this section are then strengthened by drawing upon two relevant episodes in the (...)
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