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  1. Manipulations of Distractor Frequency Do Not Mitigate Emotion-Induced Blindness.Jenna L. Zhao & Steven B. Most - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (3):442-451.
    ABSTRACTEmotional distractors can impair perception of subsequently presented targets, a phenomenon called emotion-induced blindness. Do emotional distractors lose their power to disrupt perception when appearing with increased frequency, perhaps due to desensitisation or enhanced recruitment of proactive control? Non-emotional tasks, such as the Stroop, have revealed that high frequency distractors or conflict lead to reduced interference, and distractor frequency appears to modulate attentional capture by emotional distractors in spatial attention tasks. But emotion-induced blindness is thought to reflect perceptual competition between (...)
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  • Moderate Threat Causes Longer Lasting Disruption to Processing in Anxious Individuals.Sophie Forster, Anwar O. Nunez-Elizalde, Elizabeth Castle & Sonia J. Bishop - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Encoding of Goal-Relevant Stimuli is Strengthened by Emotional Arousal in Memory.Tae-Ho Lee, Steven G. Greening & Mara Mather - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Emotion Induced Blindness Is More Sensitive to Changes in Arousal As Compared to Valence of the Emotional Distractor.Divita Singh & Meera M. Sunny - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Arousal Amplifies the Impact of Salience.Matthew R. Sutherland & Mara Mather - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (3):616-622.
    Previous findings indicate that negative arousal enhances bottom-up attention biases favouring perceptual salient stimuli over less salient stimuli. The current study tests whether those effects were driven by emotional arousal or by negative valence by comparing how well participants could identify visually presented letters after hearing either a negative arousing, positive arousing or neutral sound. On each trial, some letters were presented in a high contrast font and some in a low contrast font, creating a set of targets that differed (...)
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  • Reward Learning and Negative Emotion During Rapid Attentional Competition.Takemasa Yokoyama, Srikanth Padmala & Luiz Pessoa - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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