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Mary Anne Warren (1973). On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion.

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  1.  26
    What Do We Owe to Intelligent Robots?John-Stewart Gordon - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-15.
    Great technological advances in such areas as computer science, artificial intelligence, and robotics have brought the advent of artificially intelligent robots within our reach within the next century. Against this background, the interdisciplinary field of machine ethics is concerned with the vital issue of making robots “ethical” and examining the moral status of autonomous robots that are capable of moral reasoning and decision-making. The existence of such robots will deeply reshape our socio-political life. This paper focuses on whether such highly (...)
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  2.  5
    Wherein Lies the Debate? Concerning Whether God is a Person.Ben Page - forthcoming - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-21.
    Within contemporary philosophy of religion there are three main ways in which God is conceptualised in relation to personhood:God is a person and so personal. God is non-personal, and so is not a person. God is a personal non-person. The first two of these options will be familiar to many, with held by most contemporary monotheist philosophers of religion and mainly by those who are pantheists., however, is a view some may not have come across, despite its proponents claiming it (...)
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  3.  10
    Elective Abandonment: A Male Counterpart to Abortion.Richard C. Playford - 2018 - The New Bioethics 24 (2):122-134.
    Two of the most influential arguments in favour of the permissibility of abortion were put forward in the latter half of the twentieth century by Judith Jarvis Thomson and Mary Anne Warren. The implications of these arguments for unwilling putative fathers have largely not been considered. Some have argued that Thomson's defence of abortion might allow a man under certain circumstances to terminate his parental responsibilities and rights. To my knowledge, nobody has considered the implications of Warren's argument for men. (...)
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  4.  20
    Beyond Infanticide: How Psychological Accounts of Persons Can Justify Harming Infants.Daniel Rodger, Bruce P. Blackshaw & Calum Miller - 2018 - The New Bioethics 24 (2):106-121.
    It is commonly argued that a serious right to life is grounded only in actual, relatively advanced psychological capacities a being has acquired. The moral permissibility of abortion is frequently argued for on these grounds. Increasingly it is being argued that such accounts also entail the permissibility of infanticide, with several proponents of these theories accepting this consequence. We show, however, that these accounts imply the permissibility of even more unpalatable acts than infanticide performed on infants: organ harvesting, live experimentation, (...)
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  5.  14
    Commentary: What Price Freedom?Sarah Chan - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):377-383.
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  6.  11
    Dignity, Health, and Membership: Who Counts as One of Us?Bryan C. Pilkington - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (2):115-129.
    This essay serves as an introduction to this issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy. The five articles in this issue address a range of topics from the human embryo and substantial change to conceptions of disability. They engage claims of moral status, defense of our humanity, and argue for an accurate and just classification of persons of different communities within a healthcare system. I argue in this essay that though their concerns are diverse, the authors in this issue (...)
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  7.  27
    Abortion, Property, and Liberty.William Simkulet - 2016 - The Journal of Ethics 20 (4):373-383.
    In “Abortion and Ownership” John Martin Fischer argues that in Judith Jarvis Thomson’s violinist case you have a moral obligation not to unplug yourself from the violinist. Fischer comes to this conclusion by comparing the case with Joel Feinberg’s cabin case, in which he contends a stranger is justified in using your cabin to stay alive. I argue that the relevant difference between these cases is that while the stranger’s right to life trumps your right to property in the cabin (...)
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  8.  8
    From Pluralism to Consensus in Beginning-of-Life Debates: Does Contemporary Natural Law Theory Offer a Way Forward?Patrick Tully - 2016 - Christian Bioethics 22 (2):143-168.
  9.  46
    On Okin's Critique of Libertarianism.Daniel J. Hicks - 2015 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (1):37-57.
    Susan Moller Okin's critique of libertarianism in Justice, Gender, and the Family has received only slight attention in the libertarian literature. I find this neglect of Okin's argument surprising: The argument is straightforward and, if sound, it establishes a devastating conflict between the core libertarian notions of self-ownership and the acquisition of property through labour. In this paper, I first present a reconstruction of Okin's argument. In brief, she points out that mothers make children through their labour; thus it would (...)
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  10.  16
    Michael Huemer’s A Priori Defense of Metaethical Internalism.Sanford Levy - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (4):1067-1080.
    Versions of internalism have played important roles in metaethics, for example, in defending irrealist options such as emotivism. However, internalism is itself as controversial as the views it is used to defend. Standard approaches to testing the view, such as thought experiments about amoralists, have failed to gain consensus. Michael Huemer offers a defense of internalism of a different kind which he calls the “argument from interpretation.” He presents the argument as one Humeans could embrace, but versions could be accepted (...)
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  11.  14
    Mutual Scorn Within the Abortion Debate: Some Parallels With Race Relations.Bertha Manninen - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (2):295-311.
    By emphasizing the parallels between both racial vilification and the vilification that takes place when we discuss abortion in our society, I hope to provide a new perspective on the way the United States converses about this divisive issue. This perspective, in turn, can help us see how we can move forward from the stagnate polemics that have permeated the abortion debate in the United States for the past 40 years.
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  12.  63
    Machines and the Moral Community.Erica L. Neely - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (1):97-111.
    A key distinction in ethics is between members and nonmembers of the moral community. Over time, our notion of this community has expanded as we have moved from a rationality criterion to a sentience criterion for membership. I argue that a sentience criterion is insufficient to accommodate all members of the moral community; the true underlying criterion can be understood in terms of whether a being has interests. This may be extended to conscious, self-aware machines, as well as to any (...)
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  13.  72
    Hylemorphism, Remnant Persons and Personhood.Patrick Toner - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):76-96.
    Animalism is the doctrine that we human beings are – are identical with – animals. Hylemorphism is a form of animalism. In this paper, I defend hylemorphism by showing that while other forms of animalism fall prey to the problem of ‘Remnant Persons,’ hylemorphism does not. But hylemorphism's account of personhood seems to have some very implausible implications. I address one of those implications, and argue that it isn't nearly as objectionable as it might at first appear.
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  14.  63
    How to Understand a Woman's Obligations to the Fetus in Unwanted Pregnancies.Kristen Hine - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):239-247.
    Some have challenged Thomson’s case of the famous unconscious violinist (UV) by arguing that in cases of consensual sex a woman is partially morally responsible for the existence of a needy fetus; since she is partially responsible she ought to assist the fetus, and so abortion is morally wrong. Call this the Responsibility Objection (RO) to UV. In this paper, I briefly criticize one of the most widely discussed objections to RO and then suggest a new way to challenge RO. (...)
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  15.  51
    The Value of Choice and the Choice to Value: Expanding the Discussion About Fetal Life Within Prochoice Advocacy.Bertha Alvarez Manninen - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (3):663-683.
  16.  38
    The Ethics of Moral Compromise for Stem Cell Research Policy.Zubin Master & G. K. D. Crozier - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (1):50-65.
    In the US, stem cell research is at a moral impasse—many see this research as ethically mandated due to its potential for ameliorating major diseases, while others see this research as ethically impermissible because it typically involves the destruction of embryos and use of ova from women. Because their creation does not require embryos or ova, induced pluripotent stem cells offer the most promising path for addressing the main ethical objections to stem cell research; however, this technology is still in (...)
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  17. Stem Cell Research on Embryonic Persons Is Just.Aaron Rizzieri - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):195-203.
    Abstract I argue that embryonic stem cell research is fair to the embryo, even on the assumption that the embryo has attained full personhood and an attendant right to life at conception. This is because the only feasible alternatives open to the embryo are to exist briefly in an unconscious state and be killed or to not exist at all. Hence, one is neither depriving the embryo of an enduring life it would otherwise have had nor is one causing the (...)
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  18.  63
    Humanizing Personhood.Adam Kadlac - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):421 - 437.
    This paper explores the debate between personists, who argue that the concept of a person if of central importance for moral thought, and personists, who argue that the concept of a human being is of greater moral significance. On the one hand, it argues that normative naturalism, the most ambitious defense of the humanist position, fails to identify moral standards with standards of human behavior and thereby fails to undermine the moral significance of personhood. At the same time, it contends (...)
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  19.  28
    Human Non-Persons, Feticide, and the Erosion of Dignity.Daryl Pullman - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (4):353-364.
    Feticide, the practice of terminating the life of an otherwise viable fetus in utero, has become an increasingly common practice in obstetric centres around the globe, a concomitant of antenatal screening technologies. This paper examines this expanding practice in light of the concept of human dignity. Although it is assumed from the outset that even viable human fetuses are not persons and as such do not enjoy full membership in the moral community, it is argued that the fact that these (...)
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  20.  19
    The Beginning of Individual Human Personhood.P. S. Penner & R. T. Hull - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (2):174-182.
    Even for persons who hold to the ethical acceptance of abortion practices in general, questions of detail often arise. If you assume the distinction between the physical human organism alone and the person that is associated with that organism, then you must face the question of whether it is permissible to abort a fetus if the corresponding person has come into being. We take the position that the abortion of a fetus that has achieved this level of development should be (...)
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  21. Abortion, Killing, and Maternal Moral Authority.Soran Reader - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):132-149.
    : A threat to women is obscured when we treat "abortion-as-evacuation" as equivalent to "abortion-as-killing." This holds only if evacuating a fetus kills it. As technology advances, the equivalence will fail. Any feminist account of abortion that relies on the equivalence leaves moral room for women to be required to give up their fetuses to others when it fails. So an account of the justification of abortion-as-killing is needed that does not depend on the equivalence.
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  22.  8
    Abortion, Killing, and Maternal Moral Authority.Soran Reader - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):132-149.
  23.  1
    Abortion Activism and Civil Discourse: Reply to Shields.Robert Talisse & Steven Maloney - 2008 - Critical Review 20 (1-2):167-179.
    Jon Shields's finding—that certain evangelical pro‐life activist groups are more interested in deliberative discussions about abortion than are pro‐choice activists—is wrong on methodological, normative, and philosophical grounds. He generalizes about pro‐life civility from a small, trained sample group, and ignores possibly important variables that would explain pro‐choicers' incivility. Further, politeness is not necessarily a requirement of democratic deliberation—which entails not forcing one's own beliefs on the public, as pro‐lifers manifestly are trying to do, despite their calm demeanor. Conversely, some pro‐choicers' (...)
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  24.  83
    The Harm of Death, Time-Relative Interests, and Abortion.David Degrazia - 2007 - Philosophical Forum 38 (1):57–80.
    Regarding the sinking lifeboat scenario involving several human beings and a dog, nearly everyone agrees that it is right to sacrifice the dog. I suggest that the best explanation for this considered judgment, an explanation that appears to time-relative interests, contains a key insight about prudential value. This insight, I argue, also provides perhaps the most promising reply to the future-like-ours argument, which is widely regarded as the strongest moral argument against abortion. Providing a solution to a longstanding puzzle in (...)
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  25.  26
    An Ironic Reductio for a 'Pro-Life' Argument:1 Hurlbut's Proposal for Stem Cell Research.Kevin Elliott - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (2):98–110.
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  26.  25
    Reply to Julia Driver, Timm Triplett, and Kathleen Wallace.Bernard Gert - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (4):404-419.
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  27.  13
    Individuality and Human Beginnings: A Reply to David DeGrazia.Alfonso Gómez-Lobo - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (3):457-462.
    The author argues that individuality does not require indivisibility and that twinning can be explained as the reprogramming of blastomeres that already have begun to differentiate in accordance with the needs of the unified organism that originates at conception.
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  28.  1
    Individuality and Human Beginnings: A Reply to David DeGrazia.Alfonso Gómez-Lobo - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (3):457-462.
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  29. The Moral-Principle Objection to Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Don Marquis - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):190–206.
    Opponents of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research claim that such research is incompatible with the moral principle that it is always wrong intentionally to end a human life. In this essay, I discuss how that principle might be revised so that it is subject to as few difficulties as possible. I then argue that even the most defensible version of the principle is compatible with the moral permissibility of hESC research.
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  30.  17
    Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity.David B. Resnik - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (3):211-222.
    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos as property, patent agencies (...)
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  31.  40
    Moral Reform, Moral Disagreement, and Abortion.Kathleen Wallace - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (4):380-403.
  32.  17
    Moral Status, Human Identity, and Early Embryos: A Critique of the President's Approach.David DeGrazia - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):49-57.
    Underlying President Bush's view regarding stemcell research and cloning are two assumptions: we originate at conception, and we have full moral status as soon as we originate. I will challenge both assumptions, argue that at least the second is mistaken, and conclude that the President's approach is unsustainable.
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  33.  33
    Who Should Control the Use of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines: A Defence of the Donors' Ability to Control. [REVIEW]Søren Holm - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):55-68.
    In this paper I analyse who should be able to control the use of human embryonic stem cell lines. I distinguish between different kinds of control and analyse a set of arguments that purport to show that the donors of gametes and embryos should not be able to control the use of stem cell lines derived from their embryos. I show these arguments to be either deficient or of so general a scope that they apply not only to donors but (...)
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  34.  88
    Safety, Identity and Consent: A Limited Defense of Reproductive Human Cloning.Robert Lane - 2006 - Bioethics 20 (3):125–135.
    Some opponents of reproductive human cloning have argued that, because of its experimental nature, any attempt to create a child by way of cloning would risk serious birth defects or genetic abnormalities and would therefore be immoral. Some versions of this argument appeal to the consent of the person to be conceived in this way. In particular, they assume that if an experimental reproductive technology has not yet been shown to be safe, then, before we use it, we are morally (...)
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  35. Abortion and the Beginning and End of Human Life.Don Marquis - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):16-25.
    The doctrine that it is wrong to end the existence of something because it is a human life I call “the standard view.” I argue that attempts by proponents of abortion choice to avoid the implications of the standard view by suggesting that we don't know when life begins or by suggesting that fetuses are only potential lives fail. Nevertheless, opponents of abortion choice should not base their arguments on the standard view, for the standard view is false. I propose (...)
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  36.  12
    Abortion and the Beginning and End of Human Life.Don Marquis - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):16-25.
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  37.  19
    Embryonic Personhood, Human Nature, and Rational Ensoulment.John R. Meyer - 2006 - Heythrop Journal 47 (2):206–225.
    This essay briefly describes a few of the problems associated with using personhood language to defend the right to life of the pre‐implantation embryo. Arguing that an immaterial soul explains the personal identity of an embryo is problematic for many people because there is no apparent spiritual activity in the unborn. While some scholars argue that the embryo has the potential to act as an adult person and thus should be protected from harm, others contend that potentiality alone is insufficient (...)
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  38.  53
    The Morality of Killing Human Embryos.Bonnie Steinbock - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):26-34.
    The morality of embryonic stem cell research depends on the moral status of human embryos. I defend the interest view against some of Don Marquis's objections, and show that on his own Valuable Futures account, ESCR is morally permissible.
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  39.  5
    The Morality of Killing Human Embryos.Bonnie Steinbock - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):26-34.
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  40. Human and Animal Subjects of Research: The Moral Significance of Respect Versus Welfare.Rebecca L. Walker - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):305-331.
    Human beings with diminished decision-making capacities are usually thought to require greater protections from the potential harms of research than fully autonomous persons. Animal subjects of research receive lesser protections than any human beings regardless of decision-making capacity. Paradoxically, however, it is precisely animals’ lack of some characteristic human capacities that is commonly invoked to justify using them for human purposes. In other words, for humans lesser capacities correspond to greater protections but for animals the opposite is true. Without explicit (...)
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  41. Fatherhood and Child Support: Do Men Have a Right to Choose?Elizabeth Brake - 2005 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):55–73.
  42. Abortion, Personhood and the Potential for Consciousness.Robert Larmer - 1995 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (3):241-251.
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  43.  99
    Animal Welfare and Individual Characteristics: A Conversation Against Speciesism.Marc Bekoff & Lofe Gruen - 1993 - Ethics and Behavior 3 (2):163 – 175.
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  44.  14
    The Fallacy of the Slippery Slope Argument on Abortion.Chenyang Li - 1992 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (2):233-237.
    ABSTRACT This paper attempts to show that the acorn–oak tree argument against the slippery slope on the personhood of the fetus is valid and William Cooney's attack on this argument fails. I also argue that the slippery slope argument leads to on undesirable conclusion and should not be used as a valid tool in the debate on the personhood of the fetus.
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  45. Abortion Through a Feminist Ethics Lens.Susan Sherwin - 1991 - Dialogue 30 (3):327-.
  46.  36
    Enforced Pregnancy, Rape, and the Image of Woman.Ann E. Cudd - 1990 - Philosophical Studies 60 (1-2):47 - 59.
  47.  28
    The Economic Efficiency and Equity of Abortion.Thomas J. Meeks - 1990 - Economics and Philosophy 6 (1):95.
    On the face of it, the protracted public controversy over abortion in the United States and elsewhere might seem to rest on intractable normative questions inaccessible to economic analysis. But an influential early essay in the now sizable philosophical literature on the subject suggests otherwise. Judith Jarvis Thomson disarmingly inclined toward the view that “the fetus has already become a human person well before birth”,. presumably with all the rights pertaining thereto. She denied, however, that such rights necessarily include use (...)
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  48.  9
    Beyond Abortion:Refusal of Caesarean Section.Mary Mahowald - 1989 - Bioethics 3 (2):106–121.
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  49.  19
    Conceptual Analysis in Applied Philosophy.Jerald Lee Mosley - 1987 - Metaphilosophy 18 (3-4):214-221.
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  50.  66
    Philosophy and the Morality of Abortion.John Baker - 1985 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (2):261-270.
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